Satya Nadella gives his first interview as Microsoft CEO

It's been a couple of weeks since Microsoft named its former cloud and enterprise head Satya Nadella to be its new CEO but aside from a couple of in-house interviews he didn't get any questions from the outside press. That changed today as The New York Times published a brief chat with Nadella.

Folks who might be hoping he would reveal specifics about how he will be changing things at Microsoft will be disappointed in this first interview. However, Nadella does say that most companies don't have a long lifespan and he wants Microsoft to be an exception, saying, "There are very few examples of even 100-year old companies. For us to be a 100-year old company where people find deep meaning at work, that’s the quest."

As far as how he will lead Microsoft into a new era, Nadella repeated what he said a few weeks ago, saying that the company is looking to increase the amount of innovation it creates: "It’s not going to come because of an org chart or the organizational boundaries." He also speaks about company co-founder Bill Gates working as its Technology Advisor, saying, "He is in fact making some pretty hard trade-offs to say, 'O.K., I’ll put more energy into this.'"

Source: New York Times | Image via Microsoft

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19 Comments

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i just don't like this dude... it seems like Microsoft needs energy to move forward , and this guy seems to lack that energy.

he seems more of the type of guys that listen and do what they are told (they are good at it) but that's about it.

oh well plan b is set in place if he cant deliver.

It's funny all the hate Balmer and MS get and all they do is pretty much break profit records each QTR. Regardless of the internet hate they get they make a TON of money they have a better credit rating then the actual US government and rake in tons of money.

The ONLY problem they actually have is a perception issue among internet hipsters who were born into hating MS. The products are good the profits are through the roof they are doing well in so many aspects that they are assured long term viability.

You want to see a company with issues look at Sony, all the internet love in the world isn't going to save them, they are shedding off major divisions, selling all their HQ retail offices, laying off thousands and thousands of people, scaling back everywhere, having major billion dollars loses every QTR. That company is screwed, and all the internet love Sony gets isn't helping them out. The only division keeping them from bankruptcy is their insurance division which has nothing to do with Electronics.

So honestly MS may be hated on the net but the company is in solid shape and doing much better than other companies that internet fanboys fawn over.

There are loads of companies over 100 years old. Nevertheless, it will be a great achievement if Microsoft do manage to make it.

That is a smart man. Ballmer was an embarrassment in the IQ department. I hope he has whatever Microsoft needs right now - I for one am not sure exactly what that is.

Edited by a1ien, Feb 20 2014, 7:09pm :

An embarrassment in the IQ department that made Microsoft record profit and revenue year after year after year.

Edited by Eric, Feb 21 2014, 2:21am :

The day before Ballmer took over as CEO in 1999, Microsoft's market capitalization was $600 billion USD. On the day before he announced his retirement, it was under $270 billion USD.

Fritzly said,

The day before Ballmer took over as CEO in 1999, Microsoft's market capitalization was $600 billion USD. On the day before he announced his retirement, it was under $270 billion USD.


sounds you made this up since Microsoft was not worth as much back then. Please provide your reference.

The day before Ballmer took over as CEO in 1999, Microsoft's market capitalization was $600 billion USD. On the day before he announced his retirement, it was under $270 billion USD.

You mean the $600 billion that was a giant bubble waiting to fall? And when did it fall? Oh right after the US Supreme court labeled Microsoft a monopoly and started to put in restrictions of what the company could and couldn't do. Which did involve a DOJ person at MS personally approving everything that the company made.

Oh look at the lovely source you provided:

1999 MSFT - $271 billion
2000 MSFT - $586 billion
2001 MSFT - $258 billion

I wonder what that looks like....

Before he retired he completely restructured and redirected the company so that it would be better positioned for the future (While maintaining and building upon record profitability). I would hardly call that a small feat.

Edited by Eric, Feb 21 2014, 2:17am :

-Razorfold said,

You mean the $600 billion that was a giant bubble waiting to fall? And when did it fall? Oh right after the US Supreme court labeled Microsoft a monopoly and started to put in restrictions of what the company could and couldn't do. Which did involve a DOJ person at MS personally approving everything that the company made.

Oh look at the lovely source you provided:

1999 MSFT - $271 billion
2000 MSFT - $586 billion
2001 MSFT - $258 billion

I wonder what that looks like....

Please hammer don't hurt 'em! Nicely done sir.

-Razorfold said,

You mean the $600 billion that was a giant bubble waiting to fall? And when did it fall? Oh right after the US Supreme court labeled Microsoft a monopoly and started to put in restrictions of what the company could and couldn't do. Which did involve a DOJ person at MS personally approving everything that the company made.

Oh look at the lovely source you provided:

1999 MSFT - $271 billion
2000 MSFT - $586 billion
2001 MSFT - $258 billion

I wonder what that looks like....


It looks like that, conveniently I would add, you quoted "my lovely source" only till 2001....
2002-372 billions
2003-372 billions
2002-372 billions
2002-372 billions
2003-264 billions
2004-272 billions
2005-263 billions
2006-271 billions
2008-219 billions
2009-218 billions
2010-225 billions
2011-215 billions
2012-251 billions
2013-279 billions

In case you have problems grasping the meaning I would suggest you to try another exercise:
Chart MS stock from 1999 to 2013, Mr. Ballmer reign period, and add data for the SP 500 or some other index.
Have fun....
Just in case, you can do it here:
http://www.nasdaq.com/symbol/msft/interactive-chart
Just modify the dates and add other indexes.
BTW contrary to what you stated the Supreme Court never heard MS case; it turned down and the appeal was handled by a federal Appeal Court which in 2002 approved a settlement drafted by the Justice Dept. and MS. Furthermore the case against MS was started by the FTC in1990.

Edited by Fritzly, Feb 21 2014, 6:18am :

It looks like that, conveniently I would add, you quoted "my lovely source" only till 2001....

Because you mentioned 600 billion, which like I said WAS A BUBBLE, and which I was correct on.

BTW contrary to what you stated the Supreme Court never heard MS case; it turned down and the appeal was handled by a federal Appeal Court which in 2002 approved a settlement drafted by the Justice Dept. and MS. Furthermore the case against MS was started by the FTC in1990.

And right when the court made it's decision, the stock value dropped and has stayed that way.

I didn't disagree with anything that you said except for the stupid "MS was worth $600 billion" bit.

---

Oh and btw your values are off, by 100 billion. Here's what the rest of the chart looks like:

2002 - $326 billion
2003 - $264 billion
2004 - $270 billion
2005 - 252 billion

No idea where you got 372 billion 4 times from.