SeaMonkey 2.15

The SeaMonkey project is a community effort to develop the SeaMonkey all-in-one internet application suite. Such a software suite was previously made popular by Netscape and Mozilla, and the SeaMonkey project continues to develop and deliver high-quality updates to this concept. Containing an Internet browser, email & newsgroup client with an included web feed reader, HTML editor, IRC chat and web development tools, SeaMonkey is sure to appeal to advanced users, web developers and corporate users.

Under the hood, SeaMonkey uses much of the same Mozilla source code which powers such successful siblings as Firefox, Thunderbird, Camino, Sunbird and Miro. Legal backing is provided by the Mozilla Foundation.

What's New in SeaMonkey 2.15:

SeaMonkey 2.15 contains the following major changes relative to SeaMonkey 2.14:

SeaMonkey-specific changes

  • SeaMonkey can be set as default client/browser on Mac and Linux now.
  • See the changes page for minor changes.

Mozilla platform changes

  • The new IonMonkey compiler improves JavaScript performance.
  • Preliminary support for WebRTC has been added.
  • Image quality has been improved through a new HTML scaling algorithm.
  • CSS3 Flexbox has been implemented.
  • Support for new DOM property window.devicePixelRatio has been added.
  • Support for @supports has been added (disabled for now).
  • Startup time has been improved through smart handling of signed extension certificates.
  • HTML5: Support for W3C touch events has been implemented, taking the place of MozTouch events
  • Insecure content loading has been disabled on HTTPS pages (see bug 62178).
  • Responsiveness for users on proxies has been improved.
  • Fixed several stability issues.

The changes page lists a more detailed overview of new features and fixes relative to our last stable release, SeaMonkey 2.14. Relevant security fixes are listed on Security Advisories for SeaMonkey.

Download: SeaMonkey 2.15 | 21.2 MB (Freeware)
View: SeaMonkey Website

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8 Comments

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So this is a "everything-and-the-kitchen-sink" kit like Opera (but uglier)? With calendars and e-mail being web-based these days, what's the point?

Unlike some other browsers, SeaMonkey isn't dumbed down by default, and is fully customisable.
(Both Chrome and IE9-10 are far too dumbed down, and totally uncustomisable by comparison.)
The additional features like the built-in e-mail client and webpage editor, maybe they are surplus
features with the various web-based options available so you can take them or leave them as
you wish, but it's nice that they are there eitherway should you ever need them.

SeaMonkey doesn't have a built-in Calendar feature. It's predecessor (the Mozilla App-Suite) did.
This particular feature is now provided via an official Mozilla add-on called Lightning.

brn said,
So this is a "everything-and-the-kitchen-sink" kit like Opera (but uglier)? With calendars and e-mail being web-based these days, what's the point?

Less like Opera and more of a throwback to the days of Netscape Communicator suite, when ISPs were first taking off apart from 'online services' like AOL. Netscape Communicator would provide tools for all the standard technologies ISPs gave access to (browser-based protocols, email, usenet, and a few megs of personal web space needed an HTML editor).

Such a suite is not well-suited to today's internet, but old habits die hard--as do old loyalties--and SeaMonkey will appeal to the sort of 90s crowd that thought it was cool to put a 'Netscape Now!' button under the hit counter on their Earthlink personal home page.

Joshie said,

Less like Opera and more of a throwback to the days of Netscape Communicator suite, when ISPs were first taking off apart from 'online services' like AOL. Netscape Communicator would provide tools for all the standard technologies ISPs gave access to (browser-based protocols, email, usenet, and a few megs of personal web space needed an HTML editor).

Such a suite is not well-suited to today's internet, but old habits die hard--as do old loyalties--and SeaMonkey will appeal to the sort of 90s crowd that thought it was cool to put a 'Netscape Now!' button under the hit counter on their Earthlink personal home page.

Seamonky also appeals to the people who don't follow others opinions and can make a decision on their own, or use something just because others say how cool something is, like Chrome and Firefox, not to mention Seamonkey DOES NOT phone home EXCEPT to check for updates, if you have that enabled. Chrome and Firefox both have so many thing phoning SOMEWHERE, I prefer to call them spyware, more than a browser!!

cork1958 said,

Seamonky also appeals to the people who don't follow others opinions and can make a decision on their own, or use something just because others say how cool something is, like Chrome and Firefox, not to mention Seamonkey DOES NOT phone home EXCEPT to check for updates, if you have that enabled. Chrome and Firefox both have so many thing phoning SOMEWHERE, I prefer to call them spyware, more than a browser!!


The fear of "phoning home" is a bunch of overblown FUD based on exaggerated examples of what COULD happen if a very specific series of increasingly unlikely events somehow managed to occur.

And frankly, people who are only picking a browser after buying into that FUD would more likely just grab Chromium than get involved in this throwback.

Norton Antivirus 2013 says ''file is infected and will delete''.

Interesting as yesterday when I went to the direct link I was also told there was a problem.