TechSpot: Gainward GeForce GTX 670 Review

After many months of talking up its latest architecture, Nvidia reclaimed the single-GPU performance crown with its GeForce GTX 680, which outpaced the Radeon HD 7970 by about 7% in our tests. Kepler's arrival forced AMD to slash prices across its Southern Islands lineup, including a $70 drop on the HD 7970, putting it at $479 or about 4% cheaper than the GTX 680's MSRP of $499.

The HD 7950 also took a $60 cut to $399, making it one of the most tempting 7000 series cards because it has no equal -- or had no equal, we should say. Continuing Kepler's rollout, Nvidia has unveiled the GTX 670, which is priced against the HD 7950 at $399. Despite being $100 cheaper than the GTX 680, the GTX 670 doesn't appear to be much slower on paper, and that could spell disaster for AMD.

The GTX 670 shares the GTX 680's DNA, as it's powered by the same GK104 GPU and has many other similarities. For example, it uses 2GB of GDDR5 memory clocked at 6GHz and features the new SMX units and GPU Boost technology. Although it's targeting the HD 7950's pricing, Nvidia says its crosshairs are actually on the HD 7970 in terms of performance. Again, a scary notion for AMD.

Read: Kepler Strikes Again - Gainward GeForce GTX 670 Review
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Please can someone tell me expected release dates?
I really need a new graphic card either a 670 or a 680 but in every store I go, it's out of stock.

I didn't think I'd be retiring my GTX 560 Ti's so soon, but I really wanna max out BF 3 @ 1920x1200. The best thing is, these cards fit right into my power and heat envelope, in fact their slightly better then the GTX 560 Ti in power consumption, but with double performance

Seems very little point in spending the extra £100 for an additional 5% performance from the 680, some benchmarks show the 670 is producing higher minimum FPS as it is.

just as a side-note I understand the need for high-end specs for graphic artists and the like, but most cards are pushed to video game consumers with no real need for this much horsepower for this high of a price.

Lorddresefer said,
just as a side-note I understand the need for high-end specs for graphic artists and the like, but most cards are pushed to video game consumers with no real need for this much horsepower for this high of a price.

notsureifserious.jpg

AFAIK there's been only beta drivers for the GTX 600 series, which means that when the drivers are correctly released, we will see a real performance bump.

Jose_49 said,
AFAIK there's been only beta drivers for the GTX 600 series, which means that when the drivers are correctly released, we will see a real performance bump.

Speaking of that, does anybody know when we'll get WHQL 300.xx drivers?

does it really matter what card you get at this point? no video games are going to need this much power for a long time to come. my AMD 5670 is still performing well on high-max settings for modern games in 1080p which includes crysis 2, skyrim and games of that nature. I'm just starting to see this card's potential being reached and maybe a bit overstretched in some instances and it was released as a budget card quite some time ago (brand new price was $120).

Lorddresefer said,
does it really matter what card you get at this point? no video games are going to need this much power for a long time to come. my AMD 5670 is still performing well on high-max settings for modern games in 1080p which includes crysis 2, skyrim and games of that nature. I'm just starting to see this card's potential being reached and maybe a bit overstretched in some instances and it was released as a budget card quite some time ago (brand new price was $120).

You can't have a very large res then, because it's large resolutions that these higher priced cards become more powerful than the cheaper predecessors

Lorddresefer said,
does it really matter what card you get at this point? no video games are going to need this much power for a long time to come. my AMD 5670 is still performing well on high-max settings for modern games in 1080p which includes crysis 2, skyrim and games of that nature. I'm just starting to see this card's potential being reached and maybe a bit overstretched in some instances and it was released as a budget card quite some time ago (brand new price was $120).

Show your proof. With a 560Ti Superclcocked card, and an Intel 2500K processor overclocked to 3.6ghz with 16GB of ram, I dip down into low 30's on SWTOR, and BF3. with all settings maxed out. I'm also at 1920x1080, so I'm calling BS on this without proof. 2-4yr old cards ARE showing their age, and these new cards will prove it. Just wait for the benchmarks.

Lorddresefer said,
does it really matter what card you get at this point? no video games are going to need this much power for a long time to come. my AMD 5670 is still performing well on high-max settings for modern games in 1080p which includes crysis 2, skyrim and games of that nature. I'm just starting to see this card's potential being reached and maybe a bit overstretched in some instances and it was released as a budget card quite some time ago (brand new price was $120).

Show your proof. With a 560Ti Superclcocked card, and an Intel 2500K processor overclocked to 3.6ghz with 16GB of ram, I dip down into low 30's on SWTOR, and BF3. with all settings maxed out. I'm also at 1920x1080, so I'm calling BS on this without proof. 2-4yr old cards ARE showing their age, and these new cards will prove it. Just wait for the benchmarks.

Lorddresefer said,
does it really matter what card you get at this point? no video games are going to need this much power for a long time to come. my AMD 5670 is still performing well on high-max settings for modern games in 1080p which includes crysis 2, skyrim and games of that nature. I'm just starting to see this card's potential being reached and maybe a bit overstretched in some instances and it was released as a budget card quite some time ago (brand new price was $120).

I call shenanigans....

Lorddresefer said,
does it really matter what card you get at this point? no video games are going to need this much power for a long time to come. my AMD 5670 is still performing well on high-max settings for modern games in 1080p which includes crysis 2, skyrim and games of that nature.
Not being familiar with the performance of the 5670 I turned to Google for reviews. In Crysis: Warhead it achieved an incredible 3.7fps at 2560x1600, increasing to an awe inspiring 20.6fps at 1680x1050 - adding an extra card in Crossfire took it up to a heavenly 23fps. That is completely unplayable. How about Far Cry 2 at 1600x1200? That's 21fps, going up to 36fps in Crossfire. Again, both terrible framerates.

I game on a 30" monitor at 2560x1600 - admittedly that's above average. However, at that resolution not even a GTX680 2GB is powerful to max out most games. I had to add a second in SLI to get decent performance in games like Crysis 2, Alan Wake, Batman: Arkham City and The Witcher 2.

If you're gaming at 1280x1024, turning down all the settings and are happy with framerates below 60fps then sure, a 5670 will do fine. But if you're gaming at a sensible resolution - 1920x1080 or above - then it won't cut it. A GTX670 is a decent card for those that game at 1080p and care about image quality and playable framerates.