The virtual keyboard exists and it works with any device (including Google Glass)

 

With the recent development in wearable technology, integrating a seamless keyboard has become a major issue for developers but a university in Sweden (MDH) has created a product aimed to eradicate such a problem.                                    

The prototype is compatible with many devices including the notable Oculus Rift and Google Glass. A promotional video showing off its ability also states that it can function with smartphones, tablets, and computers.

The device comprises of two bracelet-like bands that link around your hands or wrists. The team at MDH hopes to redesign the keyboard by the end of development, which has been ongoing since 2005. The product has been created with the consumer in mind, so a stylish exterior should be a high priority within the lab.

Using sensors to identify the position of the hand, it assesses the movement before providing an accurate interpretation as to the desired key. In addition, the unit can recognize gestures and act as a mouse for fluent navigation.

Currently, the keyboard is only visible when wearing Glass, which could be a negative for some consumers. However, we suspect that once a wider appeal for wearable technology arises (which major retailer Amazon are encouraging with their new store), the virtual keyboard could play a key role in attracting new purchasers.

Source: Phys.org | Image via YouTube

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22 Comments

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PhilTheThrill said,
"Does it solve a problem?"

That's the question.

It does in a way. With these, you don't need to bring a keyboard with you. At any time you can use them. On a plane, at the bus stop, waiting at the DMV, etc. And with Google Glass that's even more apparent. This is for a generation of technology where you aren't tied to a bulky piece of machinery. This is not something for sitting at the computer all day in the office.

Emn1ty said,

It does in a way. With these, you don't need to bring a keyboard with you. At any time you can use them. On a plane, at the bus stop, waiting at the DMV, etc. And with Google Glass that's even more apparent. This is for a generation of technology where you aren't tied to a bulky piece of machinery. This is not something for sitting at the computer all day in the office.

So in the future, people will be standing at bus stops wearing Google Glass and plastic bracelets while typing in thin air. How cool will that look?

Major_Plonquer said,

So in the future, people will be standing at bus stops wearing Google Glass and plastic bracelets while typing in thin air. How cool will that look?

I think convenience can often supersede "coolness". I'm not saying it will happen, but that's the target for this device.

i dont see like this should be accurate enough. everybody types a little different. no idea how he wants to work out these small details. doubt it, sorry.

Sorry but if you can't feel the keys and have no tactile feedback, then that's crap. This whole ideas is crap.

It's also painful.

I know many people who type just fine on tablets/smart phones. Fully touch. Also, will only hurt if you type to hard. Dont need much pressure to type on a touch device and with anything else new, there will be a learning period and time to get used to it.

techbeck said,
I know many people who type just fine on tablets/smart phones.

Good for them. I've been a touch typist for the better part of the last 25+ years, and I have to curse every touch device every time I'm prompted for anything longer than 3 characters and I can't use a real keyboard.

Yea, I can't personally see myself using something like this for an extended period of time (I know what you mean about touch typists, 35 years here, give me a heavy mechanical keyboard thanks), but for what it's intended for it looks pretty useful.. IE it's not something you'll probably be using for 8 hours at a time.. if that was the case then yea, just bring a bluetooth keyboard or whatever with you, but for short sessions when you're on the go it looks quite handy. (No pun intended.)

_dandy_ said,

Good for them. I've been a touch typist for the better part of the last 25+ years, and I have to curse every touch device every time I'm prompted for anything longer than 3 characters and I can't use a real keyboard.

I dont like touch either for long tasks. But I am guessing at some time, this will be second nature to everyone and all of us old timers will be gone and buried.

Is that actually works or it's just a plastic dummy thing? Because I didn't see any actual demo in the video.

The problem with this sort of stuff, and it's the same problem that effects the projected keyboard you can buy from various places - is that using it for any length of time will likely hurt your fingers and give you RSA.

Tapping away on a solid wooden surface that has no cushioning at all isn't good for you.

Well, think that you wouldn't type normally... Eg it seems you don't excert any force, just the motion, so there wouldn't be any strain much more than a normal keyboard.

Ilmiont said,
Hmmmmmmm I'm sticking with a physical keyboard for now.

Not me I've been typing without having to look since I was like 6. This is awesome. I'll take 6 please.