Will ISPs begin to filter their networks for illicit music?

They might after a ruling in Belgium, where the local ISP, Scarlet (which was once part of Tiscali) has been given six months to begin filtering out infringing peer-to-peer content on its network. The court recommended that the ISP investigate Audible Magic, an audio fingerprinting application which dips into files as they are being transferred and tries to determine whether they are in fact copyrighted music; it can then block their transfer.

The International Federation of the Phonographic Industry welcomed the decision, saying it "sets an important precedent in the fight against piracy internationally" because it implements EU legislation - and so might mean ISPs in the UK would have to use filters too.

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News source: Guardian Unlimited

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What if people used proxies outside that country to access the P2P networks? From what I gather, it would be possible... Most things computer related are possible, even if it isn't now, someone can always develop a solution.

I firmly believe that Napster highlighted the need for record companies to bring back a lot of music dropped from the back catalogues lost (I believe) when CD's were introduced. Witness the amount of (70's / 80's) rock CD's (and other genres) that have appeared back on the shelves during the past 4 - 5 years or so. And over here in the UK, it's now possible to buy CD's from many of these artists at fair prices (£5.99 for a CD) and in many stores, there are further discounts when buying two or more CD's. Admittedly, the mainstream pop stuff remains at around £12 - £14 per CD, and it could be argued that this is still a little too expensive. And one could also argue that if CD's from back catalogues can be had for £6, why can't mainstream pop CD's be the same price? A similar thing appears to have happened with DVD's, in that many older movies can be purchased (over here in the UK anyway) for quite reasonable prices. Unfortuantely though, there are still people out there who feel they have a right to get 'something for nothing' regardless of how fairly priced it is - and it's these very people who are fueling the piracy market by purchasing copied CD's / DVD's. And then of course, there are those who 'just have to have it all' and buy a never ending stream of pirated DVD's / CD's just for the sake of being able to say "I have blah, by blah blah - do you want a copy?" - perhpas it fulfils some need within them, to be wanted, I don't know. Apologies for the length of this post.

echo has a point. Take m$ for example, they care that vista is being passed around. why? people are still buying it in the shops arn't they? they are still making ****ing money!!

oh calm dude, it know like many its impossible to stop them.
whats funny they managed to get an ISP to do it, i hope many don't do the same, if so just end your plan and get something else.
leave them the filter will soon go on
if not, well if sucks to be american, all that liberty for nothing.

Reading this **** really ****es me off! If organizations actually put THIS MUCH ****ING EFFORT INTO SOMETHING THAT REAALLLLLYYYYY MATTERS AND CAN ACTUALLY MAKE A DIFFERENCE WITH IT'S EFFORTS a lot of problems we have in this world could be on their way to being solved (cancer, disease, poverty, education, you name it...why don't they put forth their efforts in catching real criminals who steal credit cards and rack up thousands or steal social security numbers and private info and take loans out for hundreds of thousands under someone elses names...something that actually effects REAL people, not millionaire artists who make, compared to what they make from CD sales, all of their money off of concerts, t-shirts, hats, etc....).

No, instead they want to try everything possible to stop something that can NOT and will NOT ever be stopped. I've been around computers forever. Back when there were no .torrent or anything like that there was IRC and AOL. Then they got pushed on and .torrents became even more popular (hell, I was young and admit i was BIG into the AOL/IRC warez/pirate scene) and a LOT easier to use and get pirated music (or software/movies/etc). When they first took down Napster...all that publicity and money spent and what did it solve? NOTHING. If anything IMHO it made it INTERNATIONALLY known to every little kid, parents...human being, that "hey, you can get something for free online that you normally pay $20+ for in the store". Instead of ending anything they created a wider demographic of people who realize it's possible to get free music.

The RIAA tried digging into peoples "shared" folder and taking people to court and that was their HUGE break through that would get people to stop. Then they ended up getting less and less popular because they were taking 9 and 10 yr old kids to court. Notice how that seemed to fade? Because the work around was to compress the files (which is why p2p programs like limewire, bearshare, etc.. aren't as filled with "singles" like they used to).

Now they are going to crack into users income and outgoing information (because when you get down to it, it's the same thing that they take people to jail for, but they call them "cyber terrorists" or "cyber criminals", but it's ok for the government to do it) and sniff around for footprints to see if it's a certain file and try to block it....which, is like many have said, is very sketchy because you can download LEGAL music that's copyrighted how will it tell them apart? Are they willing to spend THAT much money and time to add a little something to each file that's for legal download so the filters knows it's a legal transfer of copyrighted material. Of course there will be work arounds to this (like compressing them or encrypting them).

It's just really frustrating to see an organization put so much IGNORANT energy and resources into something they will NEVER be able to stop as long as there is an internet. They can slow it down for a couple months but then it will only come back stronger and harder. Like I said, all this big publicity of their "new efforts" just lets more people know that it's possible to get free (normally priced products) products from the internet....it's only a google search away if you have NO IDEA on what you are doing.

echo said,
When they first took down Napster...all that publicity and money spent and what did it solve? NOTHING. If anything IMHO it made it INTERNATIONALLY known to every little kid, parents...human being, that "hey, you can get something for free online that you normally pay $20+ for in the store". Instead of ending anything they created a wider demographic of people who realize it's possible to get free music.

You've hit the nail on the head there.

Napster used to have something like 600,000 users, then the RIAA went on WORLDWIDE news programs with the story that they will clamp down on the Napster. Within weeks Napster had MILLIONS of new users! Millions!!!

Yeah, that really worked well RIAA.

Then, when Napter died, countless new sharing facilities grew out of the ashes, with million more users.

Way to go RIAA. You're thick. Plain and simple.

just more crap for the hackers to get around, password protected rars will make this mute until a hacker works out the fine points and just modifies the info that the isp's look for.

Am I the only one who thinks filtering for ILLEGAL transactions (music or whatever) is a GOOD thing? Illegal is still illegal in my book - the web does not make stealing music ripped from an item you can buy at online/offline retail okay.

wow... sounds like the the old case of "pot calling the kettle black"

I guess they following China's lead with their ISP controlling steps for what their public is allowed to view online.


Does Freedom really exist anymore ? lol I think we would all like to think so but it really doesn't. Check the fine print.


lol

wtf.. that is such a dumb idea.
As many people have mentioned, encryption would be the way to go if they start doing this stuff.

Also... how many people are going to be ****ed off that the local ISP is filtering and classifying all of there stuff? I'll tell you that most small business would not tolerate such crap, since it is a way of invading your privacy.

Silly RIAA... if they just made music more affordable (or entertainment in general) then your average user would not have the need to pirate stuff.

Silly RIAA... if they just made music more affordable (or entertainment in general) then your average user would not have the need to pirate stuff.

Just because it's not affordable gives someone the right to steal it? I'm sorry but I fail to see the logic.

Just because it's not affordable gives someone the right to steal it? I'm sorry but I fail to see the logic.

I fail to see logic in what you just said, it's copying, not stealing and copyright laws are designed to protect the owners from people copying and selling their stuff as their own, "pirates" don't do that, they share.

<<personal attack removed>>

Anyways.. where you can find a mp3 for download directly?.

mp3 usually are found in p2p (usually encrypted) and/or and almost all in ISO, RAR, ZIP and such.


minigun said,
plenty of places you can buy .mp3 files

But for the case to download a illegal mp3. AFAIK there are few sites that publish free mp3 while the rest are via some encrypted way.

Also, if you can track a mp3, then how they will known wich is a illegal mp3 or a legally buyed mp3?.


anyone can bypass this stuff...the answer is SecureIX or Relakks

or else encrypt the connection like µTorrent does already

We all know that, at some point, someone will crack it. Why making, then?

It's like brushing your teeth right before eating breakfast.

hit germany with that POS and feel the anger of close to all ISP users.......
holy cow.... in zero point nothing there will be dozens of bypass mathods....
still

Glassed Silver:mac

the alternative to sending as rar files is to change the file extension to .txt and send them through. I wish the music industry would just be more reasonable in pricing of singles and albums then there wouldn't be the same demand for pirated songs

this will fail. encryption could bypass this filter and you can be sure that people will make P2P clients which only allow encrypted connections, so the average person won't even need to worry about this.

with any luck though some ISPs will stop throttling and opt for this option instead... the ISPs will more likely go for both though

i really can't believe we are still having to listen to this crap. why is it that the music industry fail to see that their historic business model is dead in the water, they can no longer rip off the whole planet with their overly priced media. You'd think, being faced with all the evidence, they'd maybe come up with a new concept for selling their music/media. but no, they choose to "welcome" insane garbage like this. Anyone with half a brain cell can bypass this useless mechanism after 5years of study. oh wait, no, they just need to know how to compress and encrypt something......

jbrunt1990 said,
Then everything will be released in password protected rars! Stupid idea

It wont be if you know the password from the site/service you use. Automated systems would then never really know potentially.