Windows Blue references highlight more details about the path forward

As more and more people download, install and dig into the code of the leaked Windows Blue build, there are further reports on what Microsoft might add to the planned update for its Windows 8 OS. The latest such information comes from an article this week written by Sandro Villinger.

In an article on ITWorld.com, Villinger writes that a deep examination of the Windows Blue leaked code revealed "dozens of internal references to a 'Windows Defender Modern App' in Windows Blue." That likely means that Microsoft is at least working on a Modern app version of its antivirus software. Microsoft already has a desktop version of Windows Defender for Windows 8 and RT.

The leaked build has already revealed several upcoming Modern apps that are being made in-house by Microsoft, along with references to a Modern File manager app.

The article also states that the Windows Blue code has references to possible 3G/4G tethering and barcode scanner support, along with ways to extend battery life for device that use the update. There's evidence that Windows Blue uses a slightly lower amount of RAM. The code also shows support for possible higher display resolutions. Finally, the leaked build mentions "BaseFS" and "Minkernel" in the code. ZDNet.com reports that "Minkernel" might refer to an internal Microsoft project to make the Windows kernel smaller.

Source: ITWorld.com | Image via ITWorld.com
Via: ZDNet.com

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19 Comments

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I think its pointless having a big Modern App calculator. Instead, what should be used is the ability to use search make calculations and let it appear in the results like OS X Spotlight.

Mr. Dee said,
I think its pointless having a big Modern App calculator. Instead, what should be used is the ability to use search make calculations and let it appear in the results like OS X Spotlight.

Definitely. Also a good example of TRULY removjng skeuomorphic elements and being digitally authentic.

Mr. Dee said,
I think its pointless having a big Modern App calculator. Instead, what should be used is the ability to use search make calculations and let it appear in the results like OS X Spotlight.

Pointless? Maybe it should have both, but a calculator app isn't pointless. It'd be useful to have a calculator in snap view.

The ability to do calculations in the Search Charm is already there if you use the Bing, Google or whatever app that supports calculations do the search.

Mr. Dee said,
I think its pointless having a big Modern App calculator. Instead, what should be used is the ability to use search make calculations and let it appear in the results like OS X Spotlight.

Snap view, bro.

Perhaps it would be less pointless if they rebuilt the Microsoft Math app from the ground up for Metro. The program is great for students, especially since it is free and performs all sorts of advanced map and graphing! That could be a huge advantage for Microsoft over the iPad!

Anthony S said,
Perhaps it would be less pointless if they rebuilt the Microsoft Math app from the ground up for Metro. The program is great for students, especially since it is free and performs all sorts of advanced map and graphing! That could be a huge advantage for Microsoft over the iPad!

I would LOVE Math for Metro.

Not surprising. Microsoft should have ported all Windows components to Metro when it designed Windows 8 / RT. With the addition of Metro versions of Calculator, Windows Defender, Office and more there should be no need for a desktop at all in Windows RT.

Unfortunately that does nothing to help the desktop situation with Windows 8, which is where users have most expressed discontent.

theyarecomingforyou said,
Not surprising. Microsoft should have ported all Windows components to Metro when it designed Windows 8 / RT. With the addition of Metro versions of Calculator, Windows Defender, Office and more there should be no need for a desktop at all in Windows RT.

Unfortunately that does nothing to help the desktop situation with Windows 8, which is where users have most expressed discontent.


Don't forget powershell, command prompt, event viewer, etc. etc.
There's a lot that I'd definitely miss if they just axed the desktop without doing it 100% right.

The desktop experience will be improved as well, it's just not in this leaked build. It's obviously not the final version. Can't wait to see what else they're bringing to the table with Blue

siah1214 said,
Don't forget powershell, command prompt, event viewer, etc. etc.
There's a lot that I'd definitely miss if they just axed the desktop without doing it 100% right.

In terms of Windows RT most of that could be dropped, as it's a consumer OS aimed at non-technical users. However, that functionality should be ported to Metro for Windows 8 tablet users, thiough given how limited most Metro apps are I'd be surprised if Microsoft did.

theyarecomingforyou said,

In terms of Windows RT most of that could be dropped, as it's a consumer OS aimed at non-technical users. However, that functionality should be ported to Metro for Windows 8 tablet users, thiough given how limited most Metro apps are I'd be surprised if Microsoft did.

I think its a matter of time. I also think Microsoft is using this opportunity to find out what part of the desktop people really need. With each version of Windows the desktop got new features that were often poorly integrated.

Features added to the taskbar or to the control panel. Then features got regrouped but some things were left out. Each version also added a new way to access files but kept the old method as well. So now we have menus and bars everywhere in the desktop and they all do the same thing. We all grew up with the desktop so we know it by heart but its a real mess.

I'm sure a part of the reason why the desktop is poorly integrated has to do with time. But I also think Microsoft is using this opportunity to create a new UI for Windows 8 based on feedback. To see what features need to be brought into the new touch friendly UI to make it a substitute for the desktop without bringing over the mess itself. Just think about how the desktop deals with basic options. Some are in the controlpanel, others via rightclick on taskbar, some in the explorer window and others accessible via a right click on the startscreen.