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Apple gets a new, broader slide-to-unlock patent


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#16 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 11:49

Really don't see how they can be granted a patent that broadens the scope of an existing patent, and would make already existing devices infringing. This is a blatant misuse of the point behind patents.


#17 +techbeck

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 12:40

Android has been doing this in the last few version of the OS. So this patent should be invalidated. But looks like Apple thinks slide anywhere is a good idea. And I bet they think they thought of it. And they are probably right because all they to is innovate...

Just goes to prove that everyone takes ideas from others. Slide to unlock is not new... but Google made it different and now Apple patented it.

#18 OP javagreen

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 12:42

Really don't see how they can be granted a patent that broadens the scope of an existing patent, and would make already existing devices infringing. This is a blatant misuse of the point behind patents.


It just goes to prove how greedy, corrupt and anti-competitive Apple is. This is just a move to sue everybody who have already implemented a workaround to slide-to-unlock.

#19 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 14:08

Playing by the rules? bull****!

Apple already had 2 patents on slide-to-unlock, and this is the third. Why? Precisely because Apple is a pathetic money grab. This patent is not only anti-competitive, it was filed with the motive to create more frivolous lawsuits and slow down/block the competition.

So now other manufacturers have to spend more time & valuable resources on such a trivial thing like unlocking a phone.


Again, please explain why this is Apple's fault? Is what they're doing against the law? It may be ethically wrong, and obviously you don't agree with it, but any company can (and many do) play the same tactics. With the patent system how it is, if you don't patent your "method/process", somebody else will. I know we'll both agree that the patent system needs a massive overhaul.

But point being that none of this is Apple' fault. Every other big tech company does the same thing, but you don't hear about it because it seems only Apple is a "big deal" for whatever reason.

#20 Eric

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 14:13

Again, please explain why this is Apple's fault? Is what they're doing against the law? It may be ethically wrong, and obviously you don't agree with it, but any company can (and many do) play the same tactics. With the patent system how it is, if you don't patent your idea, somebody else will. I know we'll both agree that the patent system needs a massive overhaul.

But point being that none of this is Apple' fault. Every other big tech company does the same thing, but you don't hear about it because it seems only Apple is a "big deal" for whatever reason.


I bolded what they're doing wrong. You cannot patent an idea, only a method of implementing it.

#21 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 14:15

I bolded what they're doing wrong. You cannot patent an idea, only a method of implementing it.


That was bad wording on my part. It should be "method" instead of "idea". Thanks for catching that.

#22 OP javagreen

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 14:52

Again, please explain why this is Apple's fault? Is what they're doing against the law? It may be ethically wrong, and obviously you don't agree with it, but any company can (and many do) play the same tactics. With the patent system how it is, if you don't patent your "method/process", somebody else will. I know we'll both agree that the patent system needs a massive overhaul.

But point being that none of this is Apple' fault. Every other big tech company does the same thing, but you don't hear about it because it seems only Apple is a "big deal" for whatever reason.


'Reasoning' and 'Explanations' for why it's wrong is clearly above the domain of your understanding and logic. regardless of the company doing it, attempting to (and in this case, successfully patenting actual prior art) patent a 'workaround' implemented by dozens of manufacturers is a disgusting money grab and is a wholly anti-competitive practice and should be banned.

And no, every big tech company doesn't do this. Every other big tech company simply implements a workaround, or pays the patent license fees to use the technology in question. No other company is as anti-competitive, patent whoring and pathetic as Apple (imagine patenting a workaround.. that's a rather low end tactic) - so that's why it's a big deal. If any other company were to emerge doing this, you'll see their name in blog posts and forum threads.

Again, any explanations and reasoning for why this practice is wrong is far beyond your understanding and logic. If you want to advocate for Apple, that's fine, go right ahead - just don't propogate bull****.

#23 Richteralan

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 14:55

Really don't see how they can be granted a patent that broadens the scope of an existing patent, and would make already existing devices infringing. This is a blatant misuse of the point behind patents.

I agree with this.

#24 Slugsie

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 15:00

Patents are backdated to when they were first put in arent they?

So if you apply for a patent in 2007, and it's granted in 2012, everyone found to be infringing between 2007-2012 could be sued.

That's my understanding but I could be completely wrong.


Except this patent was filed in August 2011. My HTC Desire from 3 years ago apparently infringes this patent. THAT is a great example of prior art which should invalidate this patent.

#25 MDboyz

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 15:24

Wow ... so it means they can even sue WP7, WP8, or Win8 for 'moving image' to unlock the device too?
Whoever approves this patent is high on drug or something.

#26 efjay

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 15:38

The bigger question is how is apple continually able to get these patents awarded especially when there is prior art? Arent they supposed to research the patents being applied for before awarding them? Is the patent office on the take? Free ipads for everyone? They all just cant be dumb as a puddle of vomit, so how does this keep happening?

#27 Astra.Xtreme

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 15:39

'Reasoning' and 'Explanations' for why it's wrong is clearly above the domain of your understanding and logic. regardless of the company doing it, attempting to (and in this case, successfully patenting actual prior art) patent a 'workaround' implemented by dozens of manufacturers is a disgusting money grab and is a wholly anti-competitive practice and should be banned.

And no, every big tech company doesn't do this. Every other big tech company simply implements a workaround, or pays the patent license fees to use the technology in question. No other company is as anti-competitive, patent whoring and pathetic as Apple (imagine patenting a workaround.. that's a rather low end tactic) - so that's why it's a big deal. If any other company were to emerge doing this, you'll see their name in blog posts and forum threads.

Again, any explanations and reasoning for why this practice is wrong is far beyond your understanding and logic. If you want to advocate for Apple, that's fine, go right ahead - just don't propogate bull****.


First of all, there's no need to attempt to insult me. It only makes you look like a child, and it gives me very little reason to even listen to your ramble. If you honestly think Apple is the only one playing this tactic, then you truly know very little about how the tech world operates. And you think this is all beyond my understanding and logic? Grow up...

I never said I think any of this is right. Quite frankly, I think the patent system allowing these things to happen, makes it almost impossible for a small company to break through with unique ideas. My point only was that these things are absolutely not unique to Apple, and they aren't doing anything lawfully wrong.

If you want to continue the discussion, go get some fresh air, calm down, and then if you have something intelligent to add, go right ahead...

#28 +Brando212

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 15:51

Again, please explain why this is Apple's fault? Is what they're doing against the law? It may be ethically wrong, and obviously you don't agree with it, but any company can (and many do) play the same tactics. With the patent system how it is, if you don't patent your "method/process", somebody else will. I know we'll both agree that the patent system needs a massive overhaul.

But point being that none of this is Apple' fault. Every other big tech company does the same thing, but you don't hear about it because it seems only Apple is a "big deal" for whatever reason.

yes, it is actually. it's anti-competitive and monopolistic. which could be very bad for them if a judge decides to call them on it

#29 mr_sock_00

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 15:54

no image moves when you unlock the s3. you can just swipe any direction and it unlocks or brings up the lock prompt to enter the PIN, pattern, whatever...

this sounds like the little arrow that moves when you swipe it, like i had on my blackberry storm years ago...


Galaxy Tab 2 does this without any pictures moving

#30 OP javagreen

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 15:55

First of all, there's no need to attempt to insult me. It only makes you look like a child, and it gives me very little reason to even listen to your ramble. If you honestly think Apple is the only one playing this tactic, then you truly know very little about how the tech world operates. And you think this is all beyond my understanding and logic? Grow up...

I never said I think any of this is right. Quite frankly, I think the patent system allowing these things to happen, makes it almost impossible for a small company to break through with unique ideas. My point only was that these things are absolutely not unique to Apple, and they aren't doing anything lawfully wrong.

If you want to continue the discussion, go get some fresh air, calm down, and then if you have something intelligent to add, go right ahead...


Drop your typical 'holier-than-thou' attitude you're spraying all over. If you feel insulted by what I wrote in here, you need to shut down your computer and step outside for a change. An appointment with a therapist would be even better. And you tell me to 'grow up'? How hyperbolic of you.

Yes, you said it's ethically wrong. You agreed. And then proceeded to question anyway, as to why it's a wrong tactic. I'm unable to twist logic quite like you, and still keep on bantering the same question over and over again, I don't live in bizarro world, sorry.

When you step out of your Apple hypnomania, come back and read my previous reply.