17 posts in this topic

Posted

I am going to a fairground tonight and want to take some photos without a tripod using our D3100.

We are using the stock 18-55mm lens.

Got any tips to avoid blurred photos? Settings etc. (new to photography)

I guess we'll be taking photos of a bonfire, fairground rides, fireworks etc.

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Posted

High ISO, large aperture, experiment.

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Posted

[quote name='HawkMan' timestamp='1352040714' post='595295975']
High ISO, large aperture, experiment.
[/quote]
Which mode do you suggest I be in?:[list]
[*]Mode M (Manual)
[*]Mode A (Aperture-Priority Auto)
[*]Mode S (Shutter-Priority Auto)
[*]Mode P (Programmed Auto)
[/list]
Which ISO do you suggest? [i]3200? Hi 1? Hi 2?[/i]

Which aperture do you suggest? [i]f/2.8? f/4?[/i]

When in M (Manual) mode, the command dial changes something with numbers like: 2", 1.6", 1.3", 1", 1/1.3 1/1.6, 1/2 etc. No idea what it is. What should I use?

Also, when in M (Manual) mode, I can't change aperture. I can only change the aperture in A (Aperture-Priority Auto) mode.

I took this two years ago with my iPhone 4, surprised how well it turned out :p

[attachment=321009:eb_fgride-ip4.JPG]

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Posted

A and S are the modes you should always use, M is for when those don't cut it and you need to take control, remember, when shooting in raw, you can digitally increase the exposure level two levels without quality loss on the computer.

so since I said use a large aperture, set it to A mode and crank that aperture up, which is a bit backwards since large aperture is low number :)

The numbers that change from single digits with
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Posted

[quote name='HawkMan' timestamp='1352043914' post='595296057']
A and S are the modes you should always use, M is for when those don't cut it and you need to take control, remember, when shooting in raw, you can digitally increase the exposure level two levels without quality loss on the computer.

so since I said use a large aperture, set it to A mode and crank that aperture up, which is a bit backwards since large aperture is low number :)

The numbers that change from single digits with

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Posted

yeah, 2.8 was a bit optimistic on a kit lens, 3.5 sounds more realistic :)the 1/xx number that change automatically in A mode would be the shutter time/speed.

nah, leave the rest as is, you "MAY" want to change metering mode to center weighted, but this is something you need to experiment with and depends on what you're shooting and how you want it to look. but if you use center weight it will use the center light where you point the camera and will probably shoot faster, not trying to make all the blackness around the target visible.

And experiment with the ISO beforehand and during to make sure it's not to noisy for you. but remember good apps like lightroom, or even Windows Photo Gallery can remove a lot of the noise, but it will smooth out a lot of details. basically faces can get more of a "glamour" shot look.

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Posted

[quote name='HawkMan' timestamp='1352048964' post='595296221']
yeah, 2.8 was a bit optimistic on a kit lens, 3.5 sounds more realistic :)the 1/xx number that change automatically in A mode would be the shutter time/speed.

nah, leave the rest as is, you "MAY" want to change metering mode to center weighted, but this is something you need to experiment with and depends on what you're shooting and how you want it to look. but if you use center weight it will use the center light where you point the camera and will probably shoot faster, not trying to make all the blackness around the target visible.

And experiment with the ISO beforehand and during to make sure it's not to noisy for you. but remember good apps like lightroom, or even Windows Photo Gallery can remove a lot of the noise, but it will smooth out a lot of details. basically faces can get more of a "glamour" shot look.
[/quote]
I won't be taking photos of people.

I have changed "Metering Mode" to "Center-weighted".

I won't know if 1600 is enough because it's hard to tell if the photos are blurry until I get them home.

On the other hand, if I take them all at 3200 to be safe that there is minimal blur, I will get noisy photos.

I'll stick with 1600 and hope for the best.

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Posted

You can zoom in on the previews on the camera to check if they are blurry/noisy.

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Posted

[quote name='HawkMan' timestamp='1352051463' post='595296359']
You can zoom in on the previews on the camera to check if they are blurry/noisy.
[/quote]

Yeh but to me, it's just not the same.

But sure, it'll tell me if they're very blurred :)

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Posted

Here are the photos I took last night: [url="https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10151895988275016.524743.507385015"]Link[/url]

Any comments/tips would be appreciated :)

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Posted

Link doesnt work, its a private page
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Posted

Agree, link doesn't work, but I'd like to see them. I love pictures of rides at night.
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Posted

[quote name='MidTxWRX' timestamp='1353019102' post='595323496']
Link doesnt work, its a private page
[/quote]

[quote name='Hendrick' timestamp='1353019489' post='595323512']
Agree, link doesn't work, but I'd like to see them. I love pictures of rides at night.
[/quote]

Try now.

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Posted

Once you have some decent still photos using the advice above, some Long Time Exposure shots would look pretty decent at night with all those bright rides lights

EDIT - Just realised it was the other night lol

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Posted

[quote name='King Mustard' timestamp='1353092100' post='595325706']
Try now.
[/quote]

Nope

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Posted

[quote name='MidTxWRX' timestamp='1353446139' post='595337410']
Nope
[/quote]
I'm pretty sure it's just you now, it was fixed a day or two back.

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Posted

I'm sure it's been discussed already... proper exposure is a combination of shutter speed + aperture + ISO

If you don't want blur, you need to keep the shutter speed pretty quick. 1/2s, 1/5s, 1/25s shutter speed = blurry but properly exposed picture. 1/100s, 1/200s = not blurry, but much darker picture. VR lens can allow you to be a little more shaky (and using a slower S value).

So if you used S (or Tv for Canon) on the PSAM dial and set a value, the brains of the camera will automatically adjust to the appropriate aperture to get the best shot; generally at night, it will use the largest aperture (smallest aperture number) possible for your lens (unless you are spot metering). What do you have left to control? ISO. If shutter speed + aperture is still too dark, bump up ISO. It will cost you in terms of increased noise in the picture.

Get a feel of what your camera is capable of... what its limits are and what settings generate the most acceptable image. Use a constantly moving object (i dunno... a fan of some sort) in a low light environment (not completely dark mind you, some light) and shoot it. Play with shutter speed and ISO. If no fan, just go out on a main street, or a pet. As a point of reference, i am in a room lit by a single ceiling light (60W i think) with a decorative glass thingy. I used A and set 3.5, ISO is 1600, matrix meter and the camera is thinking of using 1/8-1/50s shutter. It's not dark by any means, but it's not bright either. Using aperture 1.8, the camera thinks 1/20-1/250. Doesn't mean you should go grab fast lenses to achieve what you want because larger apertures have their own characteristics - mainly objects in front and/or behind the point of focus can get out of focus.

If you didn't already know, your camera does tell you if it thinks your image will be too dark, too bright or just right. The scale in the viewfinder -...0...+ will guide you.

On a plus side, Lightroom is able to clean up noise in photos if you shoot RAW. You lose a little bit of detail but really who looks at photos at 100% crop anyways. :p

edited for some clarity.

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