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#16 shozilla

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 17:40

3.5 seems to be 1/500 - does that make sense :s

So, I need a new lens ideally. What do I look for?





HawkMan suggested I use "A mode" at night, but this clearly ended up with awful photos. So you guys think I should have used "S mode", instead?


It works for me... you can pratice with those modes and see what is the best for your liking.

for the cars photos, if you want light flow lines as the cars go by, you will need slow shutter speed for that.


#17 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 17:44

It works for me... you can pratice with those modes and see what is the best for your liking.

for the cars photos, if you want light flow lines as the cars go by, you will need slow shutter speed for that.

But to avoid blur, I need a high shutter speed, yep? (but at the cost of a dark photo?)

#18 Nashy

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 17:46

I've taken many, many night shots with this lens, so the lens is fine.

A high shutter speed doesn't always mean dark photos, but in essence, yes, that's correct. However, I recommend shooting in RAW. That way you can take these dark photos and use Lightroom to add the lighting. It's very simple to do with the presets.

It's pretty common practice from what I've seen.

#19 shozilla

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:01

But to avoid blur, I need a high shutter speed, yep? (but at the cost of a dark photo?)


If you are taking photos in the dark areas, you can use external strobes facing at the objects you are taking the photo of. You can put the strobe on your camera or on the ground as long as you have wireless command system or whatever it is called.. i haven't used wireless based system for strobes yet. So far I have used the strobe on my camera.

I have used 90% of daytime for photo shooting... 10% for night time and/or dark indoor such as christmas trees, something like that.

or you can take photos in the dark and add lighting presets in the photo editor such as lightroom...

#20 Detection

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:21

If you are taking photos in the dark areas, you can use external strobes facing at the objects you are taking the photo of. You can put the strobe on your camera or on the ground as long as you have wireless command system or whatever it is called.. i haven't used wireless based system for strobes yet. So far I have used the strobe on my camera.

I have used 90% of daytime for photo shooting... 10% for night time and/or dark indoor such as christmas trees, something like that.

or you can take photos in the dark and add lighting presets in the photo editor such as lightroom...



Lightroom is a pretty amazing piece of software

Just using the simple steps this guy explains in this video improved many photos I have, even non-RAW format images such as jpgs get a nice improvement



#21 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:32

Lightroom is a pretty amazing piece of software

Just using the simple steps this guy explains in this video improved many photos I have, even non-RAW format images such as jpgs get a nice improvement

<video snipped>

Very nice, tar :)

#22 shozilla

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:35

Lightroom is a pretty amazing piece of software

Just using the simple steps this guy explains in this video improved many photos I have, even non-RAW format images such as jpgs get a nice improvement

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Keer-R1kEo


Why are you telling me this? I already know about this stuff.

You might have quote the wrong guy... I am not the original poster.

#23 Glassed Silver

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:36

Why are you telling me this? I already know about this stuff.

You might have quote the wrong guy... I am not the original poster.

Obviously he's not telling you, just quoting you to make the reference clear and show that his post is based on the post you made that inspired him.

Why get so defensive?

Glassed Silver:mac

#24 Enron

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:36

I would just tell all the people you're photographing to stand still.

#25 Glassed Silver

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:37

I would just tell all the people you're photographing to stand still.

That's not how street photography works, but nice trolling! :p ^^

I giggled.

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#26 Detection

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:38

Why are you telling me this? I already know about this stuff.

You might have quote the wrong guy... I am not the original poster.


You said:

or you can take photos in the dark and add lighting presets in the photo editor such as lightroom...

which reminded me of that video

#27 shozilla

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:41

Obviously he's not telling you, just quoting you to make the reference clear and show that his post is based on the post you made that inspired him.

Why get so defensive?

Glassed Silver:mac


No problem.. I understand.

Not defensive.. I was confused when he quoted me but I get it now.

You said:

or you can take photos in the dark and add lighting presets in the photo editor such as lightroom...

which reminded me of that video


Yeah I get it now..

#28 Glassed Silver

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:41

No problem.. I understand.

Not defensive.. I was confused when he quoted me but I get it now.



Yeah I get it now..


Ah ok, my bad. Fair enough then! :)

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#29 Enron

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:46

That's not how street photography works, but nice trolling! :p ^^

I giggled.

Glassed Silver:mac


That's how I do it if I don't have ƒ2.0 lens with me.

Enron:univac

#30 HawkMan

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 18:51

I do believe I told you to use either A or S and maybe M down the road when you get comfortable though.

As fora new lens, as I said before, lenses with very large aperture will give a very shallow depth of field.

But you probably need to bump past a 1600 ISP to get fast enough shots at night. I suggest you simply take the camera and have fun and play around at night a few days, and use the camera screen to check brightness and motion blur so you know what settings cause what.

And as I said I the other thread, if you shoot to dark, as long as you use raw, you can bump the exposure 2 levels without losing details. Lightroom can also remove a lot of the iso Boise at the cost of smoothing out details.