Jump to content



Photo

Chocolate of the future doesn't melt easily


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 IntegralDerivative

IntegralDerivative

    Math is the abstract key that unlocks the physical universe

  • 486 posts
  • Joined: 27-August 12
  • Location: Philippines
  • OS: Windows 8.1, Windows 7, Android 4.2.1
  • Phone: O+ 8.91

Posted 30 November 2012 - 14:44


A major chocolate maker may have hit on a breakthrough for the industry - not so much with a tasty new concoction but with a tasty concoction that doesn't melt easily.


Cadbury is patenting a technique that keeps its bars from melting even in temperatures of up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit (40 degrees Celsius), UK's Daily Mail reported.


Dubbed "temperature-tolerant chocolate" by scientists at Cadbury’s research and development plant in Bourneville, the new Dairy Milk bars stay solid even at 40-degree temperatures for more than three hours, the report said.

"We have found that it is possible to instil temperature-tolerant properties by refining the conched chocolate after the conching step. Production of temperature-tolerant chocolate would allow production of chocolate-containing product more suitable for hot climates, particularly in less economically developed countries where the supply chain is ill-equipped to handle temperature fluctuations," the Daily Mail quoted Cadbury as saying in its patent application.


In contrast, standard chocolate has a melting point of 93 degrees Fahrenheit (33.8889 degrees Celsius).


But the Daily Mail said Cadbury is not planning to sell these chocolates worldwide just yet - it's targeting hot countries, possibly India and Brazil, at least for now.


"It is not something we need in countries like the UK where heat-damaged chocolate is a very rare occurrence and storage is as it should be. Cadbury’s is capable of dealing with the temperate UK climate and there are no plans to use any new recipe. There’s just not a market for it in the UK," said Tony Bilsborough, head of corporate affairs at Kraft Foods.


But he also admitted the new bars would not have the same melt-in-the-mouth quality as normal Dairy Milks.


"The melting point is what makes the bar so attractive, as that is what releases the flavor. If it melts at a higher temperature, it will take longer for it to melt in the mouth," he said.


The secret lies in the conching step, where a container grinds the ingredients.


Cadbury developed a way to break down sugar into smaller pieces, so less fat covers them and the bar is thus more resistant to heat.


Disappointment


The heat-resistant technique did not stop Cadbury, an iconic British brand acquired by US-based Kraft, from getting heat for its decision not to sell the new bars in the UK, the Daily Mail reported.


"Kraft promised British chocolate for British people when they took over Cadbury. But it seems that we do all the innovating, then they give the best of British to people overseas," said Robert Halfon, Conservative MP for Harlow.


"This is incredibly disappointing. We invented this brand and now British workers are not being allowed to enjoy the chocolate of their labours. I would urge them to reconsider this and allow British people to have same rights as chocolate-eaters in other countries," he added.


Kennedy, a chocolate-taster for over 30 years, said such a product could be very popular in the UK.


"We also eat far more chocolate in this country than in most other places. So we should get the benefits when they come up with new innovations," said Kennedy.


On the other hand, Felicity Loudon, a descendant of the founder of Cadbury, said Kraft is an American company so we "shouldn’t be surprised that they are leaving us out."


"It is sad," Loudon added.


For their part, professional chocolatiers were unimpressed with Cadbury’s new invention, claiming it would not taste as good as original Dairy Milk.


"There’s no doubt that it will affect the taste. I can’t see why you would develop a product that is less good than the one you already have," said Willie Harcourt-Cooze, chocolate-maker and star of Channel 4 fly- on-the-wall documentary Willie’s Wonky Chocolate Factory.


Malachy McReynolds, managing director of chocolate company Elizabeth Shaw, said the melt-in-the-mouth characteristics are precisely what makes chocolate so comforting and delightful to eat.


"The pleasure of eating it will inevitably be affected. We would not make our chocolate this way," McReynolds said. — ELR, GMA News



#2 n_K

n_K

    Neowinian Senior

  • 5,419 posts
  • Joined: 19-March 06
  • Location: here.
  • OS: FreeDOS
  • Phone: Nokia 3315

Posted 30 November 2012 - 14:47

Might as well eat plastic, that melts at a much higher temperature and probably contains less contaminants.

#3 Growled

Growled

    Neowinian Senior

  • 41,508 posts
  • Joined: 17-December 08
  • Location: USA

Posted 01 December 2012 - 02:44

So will they be able to melt in your mouth or will you have to chew them up?

#4 +Brando212

Brando212

    Neowinian Senior

  • 6,869 posts
  • Joined: 15-April 10
  • Location: Omaha, NE
  • OS: Windows 8.1
  • Phone: Sony Xperia ZL, Nokia Lumia 925

Posted 01 December 2012 - 02:49

So will they be able to melt in your mouth or will you have to chew them up?

it melts in your mouth because of your saliva not from heat, so yes it should still melt in your mouth

#5 Growled

Growled

    Neowinian Senior

  • 41,508 posts
  • Joined: 17-December 08
  • Location: USA

Posted 01 December 2012 - 02:56

it melts in your mouth because of your saliva not from heat, so yes it should still melt in your mouth


That's good to know. :)

#6 +-T-

-T-

    Trapmaster

  • 2,645 posts
  • Joined: 03-December 01
  • Location: Western Australia & Scotland

Posted 01 December 2012 - 03:01

Why are the British whining, it simply isn't needed in the uk as it'll almost never hit 40c there

#7 FlintyV

FlintyV

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,377 posts
  • Joined: 14-December 06

Posted 01 December 2012 - 04:54

Why are the British whining, it simply isn't needed in the uk as it'll almost never hit 40c there


It says why in the article

Cadbury is not planning to sell these chocolates worldwide just yet - it's targeting hot countries, possibly India and Brazil, at least for now.

"It is not something we need in countries like the UK where heat-damaged chocolate is a very rare occurrence and storage is as it should be. Cadbury’s is capable of dealing with the temperate UK climate and there are no plans to use any new recipe.



#8 +-T-

-T-

    Trapmaster

  • 2,645 posts
  • Joined: 03-December 01
  • Location: Western Australia & Scotland

Posted 01 December 2012 - 05:37

It says why in the article


That just says why they're not doing it. I understand why they're not using it in the UK, but the British are whining about it not being used there.

I imagine this would impact the flavour in a negative fashion though

#9 remixedcat

remixedcat

    meow!

  • 10,454 posts
  • Joined: 28-December 10
  • Location: Vmware ESXi and Hyper-V happy clouds
  • OS: Windows Server 2012 R2
  • Phone: I use telepathy and cat meows to communicate

Posted 01 December 2012 - 08:28

ewww this just seems gross....

#10 carmatic

carmatic

    oh cool i can change my member title

  • 6,025 posts
  • Joined: 03-July 04

Posted 01 December 2012 - 08:57

it melts in your mouth because of your saliva not from heat, so yes it should still melt in your mouth

thats not melting, thats dissolving... this would be just like eating chocolate flavoured soft candy, not actual chocolate... the chocolate flavour would still be there but the texture will be completely different

#11 |Rapture|

|Rapture|

    Neowinian

  • 1,181 posts
  • Joined: 27-November 04

Posted 01 December 2012 - 09:10

Why are the British whining, it simply isn't needed in the uk as it'll almost never hit 40c there


I can promise you 99% of 'the British' really don't give a stuff. It's just a Daily Fail article and a sound bite from a politician. Both make a living from whining.

#12 McKay

McKay

    Worth the weight

  • 6,027 posts
  • Joined: 29-August 10
  • Location: 308 Negra Arroyo Lane
  • OS: Windows 8.1
  • Phone: Nexus 6

Posted 01 December 2012 - 09:30

I saw Chocolate that doesnt melt in the Gadget shop "menkind" in Nottingham.