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Parents Due $100M Back From Kids In-App Spending Sprees

usa apple class-action settlement unauthorized charges august 30 2013 deadline

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#16 Skiver

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 12:36

My daughter has a Nexus 7 and she knows not to try and buy things and asks permission before entering the App store if she wants to look for another game.

She knows the difference between free and paid for app's and we have NEVER had a problem. It wasn't hard work to get her to be responsible at all.




#17 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 12:44

Go ahead test every game inside and out at every different level. I will hold my breath while you do and expect an extensive list as to when and where things happen. For the rest of us who have a life and other things to do like have a job to pay for things like this or any of the other millions of responsibilities we have, simply turning off the ability to access the Internet while the kids play will have to suffice.....but how long until they figure out how to turn on the Internet. Thankfully, the ipad doesn't have cell service on it and driving with it is easy and mindless. But that isn't the point, it isn't that it is good or bad parenting it is that these companies are greedy and giving kids the ability to buy in ge without parental consent is like giving a drunk keys to a car. Both are going to cause damage and are unknowing at the time that they will be causing damage.
It isn't as simple as denying them access to content you don't want them to see or have access to and if you do see it and want to deny it by deleting it they can reinstall it at any time without the consent of the owner, once it has been installed it will reinstall without authorization.

Strawman huh? Got a real argument? Who suggested testing every game inside and out? How about you just test the ones you give your child access to. It takes all of 2 minutes to figure out if it is a freemium game or not. If you are to busy to spare two minutes for your child, you have biggest problems.



#18 sc302

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 13:07

I don't need to test or check out games. The point is that you can't with kids nagging and you having more important things to do when they ask at inappropriate times knowing that they are going to get what they want. Children know how and when to push buttons, when you have them you will find out how easy it isn't.

#19 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 13:21

I don't need to test or check out games. The point is that you can't with kids nagging and you having more important things to do when they ask at inappropriate times knowing that they are going to get what they want. Children know how and when to push buttons, when you have them you will find out how easy it isn't.

Actually it is. My son has yet to learn the password to the iPad iTunes account so he can't download anything. It is very simple as long as you have 2 minutes to spare for your child once in a blue moon. LIke I said, if you don't have 2 minutes to spare for your own child, you have bigger problems. The real point is stop being a lazy parent and spare 2 minutes for your child. Then this can never happen.



#20 +timster

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 13:24

So let's get this straight.  It's Apple's fault and not the irresponsible parents?  (Cue the "I don't want to live on this planet anymore" meme)

pretty much. parents don't want to be responsible for their children, and because of all the liberal laws, are too chickenshit to use any form of discipline



#21 spenser.d

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 13:41

So let's get this straight.  It's Apple's fault and not the irresponsible parents?  (Cue the "I don't want to live on this planet anymore" meme)

 

Have to agree.  There's really no reason not to keep purchasing behind a password.



#22 sc302

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 15:42

Lift all passwords then and let everything be free and open. Manage your own stuff lets see how far that goes.

#23 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 15:57

Freemium games are immoral and dangerous. They are targeted at children, yet the in-game items cost more than most AAA console games and provide effectively nothing in return. These games are deliberately crippled to the point where you effectively can't do anything without these purchases and the user is regularly prompted / coerced into buying said items.

 

It's sad that so many have been brainwashed by rampant capitalism to the point that this behaviour is considered acceptable, even commendable. It's like marketing a credit card at children and acting surprised when kids try to buy stuff with it. I swear that some people here would defend marketing cocaine to children as a valid business strategy.



#24 Colicab

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 15:58

My daughter has a Nexus 7 and she knows not to try and buy things and asks permission before entering the App store if she wants to look for another game.

She knows the difference between free and paid for app's and we have NEVER had a problem. It wasn't hard work to get her to be responsible at all.

You sir are one of the few with a brain. All too often its...

Here child, play with this £300 piece of kit, im just going to go into the other room.......

 


 



#25 +warwagon

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 16:14

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#26 spenser.d

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 17:20

Freemium games are immoral and dangerous.

 

So is not password-protecting your account/credit card.



#27 ILikeTobacco

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 19:15

Lift all passwords then and let everything be free and open. Manage your own stuff lets see how far that goes.

... you make no sense what so ever. Why would you get rid of the password protection that keeps your kid from installing and buying anything they want? That is just moronic. You are making a problem where one doesn't exist. The software works exactly as intended and as long as you are not a lazy parent, your kids won't be able to charge anything to your account. At this point I can't help but think you are trolling. Everyone else in this thread is saying useful things on how to secure a device from a child and you are saying the responsible thing to do is get rid of all protections and let them have at it. All this because you apparently don't have the occasional 2 minutes to spend parenting your child. It really only takes 2 minutes to look at a game and figure out if it is a freemium game or not. Problem solved. Go troll somewhere else please or better yet, instead of wasting two minutes of your time trolling, go be a parent to your child that you say you don't have 2 minutes for and thus everything they do isn't your responsibility.



#28 Skiver

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 08:26

Lift all passwords then and let everything be free and open. Manage your own stuff lets see how far that goes.

 

My Daughters Nexus doesn't have a password, nor does the other half's Ipad and like I said, we have never had an issue. I will grant you to a point that kids at a young age may struggle with this but then I also don't think that kids too young to understand are possibly too young to be playing on it in the first place.

 

You sir are one of the few with a brain. All too often its...

Here child, play with this £300 piece of kit, im just going to go into the other room.......

 

 

 

Thank you...

Don't get me wrong there are times where it is used as a "baby sitting" device, Early weekend mornings for example, however it is a weekend thing during term time and she is only allowed a few hours when she is on. 





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