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Eating popcorn in the cinema may be irritating not just for fellow movie goers, but for advertisers: a group of researchers from Cologne University has concluded that chewing makes us immune to film advertising.

 
The reason why adverts manage to imprint brand names on our brains is that our lips and the tongue automatically simulate the pronunciation of a new name when we first hear it. Every time we re-encounter the name, our mouth subconsciously practises its pronunciation.
 
However, according to the study published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, this "inner speech" can be disturbed by chewing, rendering the repetition effect redundant.

Source: The Guardian, The David Pakman Show

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No wonder i'm always grouchy at the movies... I almost never get popcorn, too damn expensive.

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Doesn't this mean that munching while studying is a bad idea?

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For some reason, all I heard was, 'Buy this product so you don't want to buy these products'. I understand this is (probably) not the message this research is trying to convey, but regardless, it's what I heard.

 

Why do I expect a 'Funded by The Weaver Popcorn Company'.  :)

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No wonder i'm always grouchy at the movies... I almost never get popcorn, too damn expensive.

 

I'd tell the manager at the theater and he will put you on a straight jacket... so you'd be fine while watching the movie...

 

:phone:

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Someone please pass the popcorn, please. With extra butter.

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For some reason, all I heard was, 'Buy this product so you don't want to buy these products'. I understand this is (probably) not the message this research is trying to convey, but regardless, it's what I heard.

 

Why do I expect a 'Funded by The Weaver Popcorn Company'.  :)

That's exactly what I thought when I read the title haha.  'Look a popcorn advertisement!'

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Doesn't this mean that munching while studying is a bad idea?

Or chewing gum.

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The reason why adverts manage to imprint brand names on our brains is that our lips and the tongue automatically simulate the pronunciation of a new name when we first hear it. Every time we re-encounter the name, our mouth subconsciously practises its pronunciation.

 

I really did not know that. I assume the reason they mentioned the movies instead of the TV is I imagine most of us get up during the commercials on TV and don't watch them anyway?

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I hear piracy helps tooo. :rofl:

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Or chewing gum.

Funnily enough I've heard the opposite. Chewing stimulates blood flow to the brain, keeping you more alert and focussed. Plus, the smell of certain types of mint helps memory (although I can't remember which claimed this... peppermint, maybe). And lastly, apparently if you chew gum during studying and then the same kind during the test, the smell and taste associations help you remember what you read.

 

I don't know which is true, but I chewed gum a lot when I was in school and I got very high marks, so... it either works, or I'm just brilliant ;)

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I call BS on the 'our mouths subconciously simulate' blah blah blah.

 

I want to see the study where THAT was proven.

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I'd tell the manager at the theater and he will put you on a straight jacket... so you'd be fine while watching the movie...

 

:phone:

 

:laugh: I hate that sometimes, there's like 20 minutes worth of adverts..

Funnily enough I've heard the opposite. Chewing stimulates blood flow to the brain, keeping you more alert and focussed. Plus, the smell of certain types of mint helps memory (although I can't remember which claimed this... peppermint, maybe). And lastly, apparently if you chew gum during studying and then the same kind during the test, the smell and taste associations help you remember what you read.

 

I don't know which is true, but I chewed gum a lot when I was in school and I got very high marks, so... it either works, or I'm just brilliant ;)

I thought this has been proven, associative learning? Do something you like whilst studying, then do the same while doing the test. (For some it's music, for others it's drugs, etc.), but again, it depends on the individual and whether or not they can manage to associate, some people like myself, just lazy as f***, so :p

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or I'm just brilliant ;)

 

Probably this :wub:

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I call BS on the 'our mouths subconciously simulate' blah blah blah.

 

I want to see the study where THAT was proven.

Come on, you know that's how they make studies nowadays :)

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Funnily enough I've heard the opposite. Chewing stimulates blood flow to the brain, keeping you more alert and focussed. Plus, the smell of certain types of mint helps memory (although I can't remember which claimed this... peppermint, maybe). And lastly, apparently if you chew gum during studying and then the same kind during the test, the smell and taste associations help you remember what you read.

I heard the same as you actually, so it's clearly a complex matter.  :s

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