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Serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin executed

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Hello,

Why did he stay 33 years in prison prior to his execution?

He got lucky. People spend a lot more time than 33 years...

Its the justice systems fault: Complex, expensive, and time-consuming appeals procedures mandated in the jurisdiction. (Wikipedia)

 

Yup just still strikes me as odd some countries still have it.

Again, like was said, this is not a US thing. This is per state.

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 Can the prisoners live very comfortably?

 

No, here are some of the horrific inhumane things he must endure as outlined in his letter:

  • the handcuffs he wears when being moved around the prison "are too sharp and "cut in his wrist"
  • the cell is too cold, forcing him to wear three layers of clothes
  • he has to rush his morning shave and brushing of teeth
  • light and television switches are outside the cell, so he has to ask for help to change channel or sleep.

Its appalling that Amnesty International hasn't stepped in to do something about this.

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Oh, you can personally account for the majority of them? Also, I am not an expert on the prisons of Norway. Are they tough enough? Can the prisoners live very comfortably? If so, that is not much justice.

 

Personally no. but it's been well documented in news, documentaries, books and psychologist reports. 

But I'm sure your expert personal opinion knows better than all these people and experts.

 

besides I wouldn't need all or even a majority of them to break your claim, I would only need ONE of them to break your claim. 

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I hate the death penalty, I think its such a barbaric punishment for the 21st century!   The govt calls it capital punishment, but in my view it's murder by the state.

 

Look at how long it took for  serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin to be executed. He was 63 years old and he should have been left to die in prison.

 

I quite like the idea, 33 years of waiting to die, it's nothing more than they deserve.

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Hello,

He got lucky. People spend a lot more time than 33 years...

Its the justice systems fault: Complex, expensive, and time-consuming appeals procedures mandated in the jurisdiction. (Wikipedia)

 

Again, like was said, this is not a US thing. This is per state.

 

Those states are part of the US. 

 

I'm strictly talking about it on a per-country basis. 

 

 

I quite like the idea, 33 years of waiting to die, it's nothing more than they deserve.

 
And those which have been executed only to be found innocent later? 
 
Something like 145 people have been exonerated from death row in the US. Not a great record. 
 

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And those which have been executed only to be found innocent later? 

 
Something like 145 people have been exonerated from death row in the US. Not a great record. 
 

 

Well thats a different issue that needs addressing.. just because someone can be found innocent doesn't make it OK if they are alive to be released, any length of time behind bars is too long for an innocent person so i don't see this as a valid point against capital punishment.

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Takes 36 years to get rid of someone who killed 22 people...

 

Thanks, court system.

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Well thats a different issue that needs addressing.. just because someone can be found innocent doesn't make it OK if they are alive to be released, any length of time behind bars is too long for an innocent person so i don't see this as a valid point against capital punishment.

 

Taking time from an innocent person is one thing but killing someone who didn't commit a crime is another thing entirely. 

 

The US has executed people when evidence has later shown they were innocent. The whole thing is barbaric. 

 

Also Q&A with Virginia's executioner from 1982 to 1999- http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/nov/21/death-penalty-former-executioner-jerry-givens?CMP=twt_gu

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Why did he stay 33 years in prison prior to his execution?

 

Because they like collecting more taxes from us.

 

I hate the death penalty, I think its such a barbaric punishment for the 21st century!   The govt calls it capital punishment, but in my view it's murder by the state.

 

Look at how long it took for  serial killer Joseph Paul Franklin to be executed. He was 63 years old and he should have been left to die in prison.

 

Maybe you enjoy paying taxes for a murder, I don't. It should be if you're guilty, you have 5-10 years to live to see if you are some how wrongfully charged and then be shot.

 

If you think being put to death is "murder of the state", maybe we should place a serial killer in your AO and hope you don't get murdered.

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I guess prison time is also "abduction of the state" and should be abolished as well.

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I guess prison time is also "abduction of the state" and should be abolished as well.

That is totally irrelevant. Killing someone is murder no matter what way you put it. Capital punishment is created based off of emotions and not logic. Yes, if one of my family members was murdered, I would be devastated and weeping. However, don't think having the person convicted of the murder be killed is right, no matter how upset and grieving I am. Capital punishment is a sophisticated systematic murder by the state.

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FYI -

Death Row U.S.A.
Spring 2013 (As of April 1, 2013)

 

TOTAL NUMBER OF DEATH ROW INMATES KNOWN TO LDF: 3,108

 

Race of Defendant:

 

White 1,341 (43.15%)
Black 1,300 (41.83%)
Latino/Latina 389 (12.52%)
Native American 33 (1.07%)
Asian 44 (1.42%)
Unknown at this issue 1 (0.03%)

 

Gender:

 

Male 3,045 (97.97%)
Female 63 (2.03%)

 

JURISDICTIONS WITH CURRENT DEATH PENALTY STATUTES: 35

 

Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho,
Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana,
Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon,
Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia,
Washington, Wyoming, U.S. Government, U.S. Military.

 

JURISDICTIONS WITHOUT DEATH PENALTY STATUTES: 18

 

Alaska, Connecticut [see note below], District of Columbia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa,
Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico [see note
below], New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia, Wisconsin.

 

[NOTE: Connecticut and New Mexico repealed the death penalty prospectively. The
men already sentenced in each state remain under sentence of death.]
 
Source - http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/documents/DRUSASpring2013.pdf

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This was a state, not federal, murder case so it has nothing to do with national policy. Virtually all murders are prosecuted by the states.

That said, there are still federal and military death penalties. Murder on a military base, federal property, banks during a robbery (bank robbery is a federal crime), etc.

I personally find it quite strange that a state can dictate it's own laws rather than the country. I guess it's what you grow up with but it just seems bizare to me.

 

Because they like collecting more taxes from us.

 

 

Maybe you enjoy paying taxes for a murder, I don't. It should be if you're guilty, you have 5-10 years to live to see if you are some how wrongfully charged and then be shot.

 

If you think being put to death is "murder of the state", maybe we should place a serial killer in your AO and hope you don't get murdered.

I don't really understand your point here, you almost seem to be suggesting that those who don't believe in the death penalty seem to think that they must think the prison system is perfect. I can only speak for myself here but just because I don't agree with it, doesn't mean I also think sitting the rest of their life out comfortably in jail with a roof over their head, a warm bed and meals to get them through the day is also an ok alternative. I don't have all the answers but I think they should work harder to "earn" their incariation and alieviate as much of the tax burden as possible.

I also don't understand the last statement, because I or others don't believe in this sentence, we deserve to die ourselves? We aren't asking for them to be set free, we do think they deserve to be punished. We just perhaps view death, sometimes as an "easy" way out. Look at the way it is carried out, a pain free injection, I'm not suggesting we should make it a painful death or anything (others may) but to the person, it is nowhere near what they have put their victims through.

In reality it is easy for me to have this opinion because I havent, and hopefully will never have to go through the pain and suffering that such an event would cause. I sincerely hope your views aren't due to the fact you or any others here have. 

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I personally find it quite strange that a state can dictate it's own laws rather than the country. I guess it's what you grow up with but it just seems bizare to me.

>

The US has a Federalist system where the central government has specific, Constitutionally limited, powers. All other powers revert to the States, including the vast majority of civil and criminal law.

The States have very strong home rule, run by their Governors and Legislatures, their own Constitutions, Supreme Courts and taxing authorities. As a result US citizens are far more affected by State laws than Federal laws, often making the States as different as some countries. Visit Massachusetts and Louisiana and it's like 2 different worlds.

In many States, including Michigan, citizen petitions can even put law changes and State Constition amendments on the ballot. If passed they become law. In some States citizens can also put recall efforts on the ballot to remove elected officials. Direct democracy with a reset switch.

Currently Michigan has no death penalty, but if the voters signed enough petitions to put it to a vote then passed it, the legislature would be obliged to enact the enabling legislation.

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Oh, you can personally account for the majority of them? Also, I am not an expert on the prisons of Norway. Are they tough enough? Can the prisoners live very comfortably? If so, that is not much justice.

 

Clearly, you know nothing at all about Norwegian culture or their justice system.

 

They're centered very much around rehabilitation rather than punishment.  I know several Norwegians myself, and though all of them were horrified by those killings, NONE of them wanted revenge on the guy that did it.

 

The world could learn much from the Norwegian attitude to life.

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