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#1 +Frank B.

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 11:39

'GBA4iOS' Game Boy Emulator Shut Down After Nintendo Files DMCA Notice

 

GBA4iOS, the popular Game Boy emulator for iOS, has been removed by its creator Riley Testut on GitHub after Nintendo filed a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) takedown request, reports The Next Web. First sharing the news through his Twitter, Testut stated that the emulator will continue to function normally on iOS devices, as in-app ROM downloads will be "temporarily suspended."

 

GBA4iOS saw its last major update in February, which added iPad support, controller skins, iOS 7 controller support, Dropbox integration, and an in-app web browser that could used to download Game Boy games from any ROM website. The emulator was also notable for bypassing Apple's App Store restrictions as it could be installed directly on an iOS device by visiting the project's official website and tapping a download link.

 

Traditionally, Apple has taken a strict stance on emulators in the App Store, which has caused apps like GBA4iOS to seek alternative methods for user downloads. For instance, open emulators such as iMAME and iDOS have made their way onto the App Store only to be pulled a short time later likely because of potential legal issues.

 

Despite the removal of GBA4iOS, the 'NDS4iOS' Nintendo DS emulator for iOS devices released last month remains available on its respective web page. However, it is unknown if Nintendo will file a similar takedown notice in efforts to prevent potential piracy.

 

Source: Mac Rumours




#2 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 17:43

But... Emulators are completely legal, as long as it's all original code and not using anything stolen from the device being emulated...



#3 +LogicalApex

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 17:51

But... Emulators are completely legal, as long as it's all original code and not using anything stolen from the device being emulated...

They are in a very grey area. Software patents really cloud the landscape... Although the code may be all new it likely violates many of the patents Nintendo holds on the software being emulated.



#4 Lord Method Man

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 17:52

But... Emulators are completely legal, as long as it's all original code and not using anything stolen from the device being emulated...

 

It says it has in-app ROM downloads which is probably what made it a no-no.



#5 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 17:52

It says it has in-app ROM downloads which is probably what made it a no-no.

 

Well yes, that's dodgy, but easy enough to remove from the app...



#6 FrancoisC

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 17:53

Problem in this case is that the emulator came with a ROM finder/downloader integrated in it :/



#7 McKay

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 17:54

But... Emulators are completely legal, as long as it's all original code and not using anything stolen from the device being emulated...

 

Only legal if they don't include the BIOS from the device. Certain emulators for Gameboys and such don't need a BIOS so they're legal. But for emulators that use the BIOS from the device are only legal if you copy your BIOS from the physical device you own over. 



#8 Andrew

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 17:56

Good news for Nintendo (Y)



#9 FloatingFatMan

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 17:57

Only legal if they don't include the BIOS from the device. Certain emulators for Gameboys and such don't need a BIOS so they're legal. But for emulators that use the BIOS from the device are only legal if you copy your BIOS from the physical device you own over. 

 

I know that, hence why I said using all original code...



#10 +LimeMaster

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 18:02

There are other emulators, so there's no need to worry if you use your phone for emulation.



#11 +warwagon

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 14:54

This doesn't have anything to do with the Google vs Oracle API Law suit that Oracle Won does it?


Good news for Nintendo (Y)

 

On the flip side emulators keeps people interested in Nintendo.



#12 thealexweb

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 16:01

This on the same day as the Wii / DS servers going off. Nintendo really wants to be hated by the community.



#13 Kriz

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 18:11

How exactly are they going to stop people with it already from using it?