Canary version of Chrome can now display Bing front page when set as default search engine

Most people who use Chrome are used to the fact that when they generate a new tab, they can see the Google front page with a grid of the most frequently visited websites. Now there's word that Google has made a slight concession to Microsoft's Bing service when it is set as the default search service in a version of Chrome.

Google employee Francois Beaufort has revealed the Canary pre-release build of Chrome can now display the full Bing.com front page, complete with its daily photo and trending news events, on the browser's new tab page when set as the default for search.

There's no word as to why Google has made this change, but it's certainly an interesting development, considering that both it and Microsoft have been battling over whether IE or Chrome is the number one most used web browser. Microsoft uses Net Application's numbers, which are based on unique visitors, to show IE in the top spot. StatCounter, which uses page views, shows Chrome to be number one.

Keep in mind this change is for the Canary build of Chrome and not the officially supported version of the browser. However, it's likely that the Bing.com tab feature will find its way to the stable version of Chrome at some point.

Source: Francois Beaufort via CNET | Image via Google

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Now all we need is for google to stop being complete dicks and make some fairly good apps for windows and windows phone, take a page from ms and stop being stuckup mother####ers

This at least opened up a very small possibility of using Chrome on my PC. Hopefully they can continue on this trend.

That's very surprising of Google. Very unlike them, looks like they're finally taking a page out of Microsoft's book on being more open to competing services on their platform.

j2006 said,
That's very surprising of Google. Very unlike them, looks like they're finally taking a page out of Microsoft's book on being more open to competing services on their platform.

I think they're at the point where all if Microsoft's past troubles with the FTC and EU are disturbingly relevant to them.

I actually think Bing is cool the way Microsoft uses to power parts of it's various services, but not as a search engine.

I think it's cool for both :)... but that's understandable from the current international perspective. Good thing that'll be changing in the near future with their new local data partners.

Curious about the chrome screenshot that is posted. It looks like a windows one but the min/max/close buttons are on the left. That would mean it is a mac version. But wouldn't it have the cocoa interface if that were true?

Makes sense, as soon as you go to Google, and it's not your home page or search engine, it prompts you if you want to make it the default.

I wonder how many of us who regularly use Bing also use Chrome?

Someone who makes a conscious decision not to use Google search might not be inclined to use Google's browser, I suspect.

In any case, good to see Google starting to respond to criticism of its practices. The recent changes to reduce Gmail scanning for students and business customers is another positive step, if years late.

Stryker297 said,
I use both IE and Chrome regularly. IE is set as my default, but when I use Chrome, Bing is my default search engine.

Me too. Have no use for Chrome with the awesomeness of IE11, but I keep Chrome for the random times when certain websites have non-standard code (i.e. webkit specific code).

wernercd said,
Wow... both Bing! users in one chat room? This is amazing! What are the odds?
And me! I actually use Bing for general searches, Google to search specific sites, and am starting to use DuckDuckGo for research (there's a GREAT Ted Talk on filter bubbles everyone should watch).

Chikairo said,
And me! I actually use Bing for general searches, Google to search specific sites, and am starting to use DuckDuckGo for research (there's a GREAT Ted Talk on filter bubbles everyone should watch).

I remember that talk. It's an interesting presentation, but wildly overstated. We filter things out in a hundred other ways more significant than our searches.

Bing is my default search engine in everything. I stopped using Chrome some time ago and I remember despising how they limited Bing when set as default on Chrome. It's a nice move but I'm good with IE11 and Firefox and I'm not planning to go back to Chrome anytime soon.

I think this is to appease the EU and prevent any intervention on its part. (Note: I hate the EU).

While this is a step in the right direction from Google, its lack of support for Windows Phone remains a huge issue for Microsoft, so i doubt this move will do little to pacify anyone over at Redmond.

Offtopic: Anyone remember when Bing was called Kumo? Seems like a long time ago now.