Intel claims full ownership of Thunderbolt trademark

Apple's Macbook Pro laptops and its new iMac models may be the first products to have the new and super fast Thunderbolt port installed. However, Intel wants to make sure people know that it still owns the trademark to the Thunderbolt name, free and clear. 9to5Mac.com reports that it has a statement from a Intel rep saying that while Apple did file for the original Thunderbolt trademark, the company "is now transferring that trademark to Intel."

Thunderbolt's technology is a collaboration between Intel and Apple. A laptop with a Thunderbolt port can support data transfer speeds of up to 10Gpbs for both directions. That is many times faster than what is possible with the popular Firewire and USB 2.0 ports that are used on most Windows PCs. The Thunderbolt port can also be used as a video display port and indeed connects to Mini DisplayPort video displays without the use of an adapter. However, while the development of the Thunderbolt technology teamed up Apple with Intel, it is indeed Intel who now owns the trademark. In a statement, Intel said:

As part of our collaboration with Apple, they did some of the initial trademark filings. Intel has full rights to the Thunderbolt trademark now and into the future. The Thunderbolt name will be used going forward on all platforms, irrespective of operating system.

 USB 3.0 is Thunderbolt's main rival in the next-gen port space. These two formats will be competing for manufacturers to support their technology going forward.

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man why can't everybody either adopt usb 3.0 or thunderbolt, why do they have to compete like this, fragmenting all of our technology

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunderbolt_%28interface%29

In comparison, Thunderbolt offers twice the peak speed and two independent buses. In theory, a single Thunderbolt port thus has four times the throughput of a USB 3.0 port. In practice, the lower latency even at the end of the chain, and very lightweight PCI Express protocol should offer performance much closer to the theoretical maximums.[18] Intel demonstrated throughputs at 62.5% of the peak using prototype products.[18] Hard drive speed could be the cause of Thunderbolt not getting closer to its theoretical maximum.[31]

KingCrimson said,
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thunderbolt_%28interface%29

In comparison, Thunderbolt offers twice the peak speed and two independent buses. In theory, a single Thunderbolt port thus has four times the throughput of a USB 3.0 port. In practice, the lower latency even at the end of the chain, and very lightweight PCI Express protocol should offer performance much closer to the theoretical maximums.[18] Intel demonstrated throughputs at 62.5% of the peak using prototype products.[18] Hard drive speed could be the cause of Thunderbolt not getting closer to its theoretical maximum.[31]

We gonna need RAID 0 SSD arrays to take advantage of this speed, or external graphics etc.

alexalex said,

5Gbps , which is 1/4 of Thunderbolt (10Gbps x 2 )

Plus thunderbolt is 10Gbps sustained data transfer (opposed to USB peak transfer rate) with no CPU overhead, USB has its place but compairing it to a 10Gbps bidirectional data transfer standard which allows daisy chained devices with video/data flowing through the same cable is silly, they both have a part to play in the future.

vvtunes said,
Remember FireWire / IEEE 1394 ?
No ? I rest my case.

I do, I even have a few firewire drives - which by the way are all faster than the USB counterparts, especially when RAIDed.

vvtunes said,
Remember FireWire / IEEE 1394 ?
No ?
I rest my case.

Yes, and? My last 3 Windows Laptops and last 2 Windows Desktop had IEEE 1394 ports. What case are you resting, exactly?

virtorio said,
You need to learn not to rest your cases so easily.
What's your point? The majority of computer peripherals are USB based. Face it, Firewire lost the battle.

tsupersonic said,
What's your point? The majority of computer peripherals are USB based. Face it, Firewire lost the battle.

In the consumer market. In the pro market it was preferred.

tsupersonic said,
What's your point? The majority of computer peripherals are USB based. Face it, Firewire lost the battle.

It was never a "battle" to begin with. They were not competing technologies, but complimentary technologies. USB was designed for lower bandwidth connections with sporadic data transfers. Firewire was designed to be (and still is) used for high bandwidth, sustained data transfer, something that USB simply cannot handle as well, or with so little overhead.

I suspect that Apple will start making high end 3d graphics accelerated video cards integral to their cinema displays. Thunderbolt will make this possible and the fact that they are using the same port is a good indication of the direction they are going with this. So for instance, buy a MacBook (pro/air) that has power friendly video. Plug it into your cinema display for higher end graphics and gaming. Just a hunch....

Shadrack said,
I suspect that Apple will start making high end 3d graphics accelerated video cards integral to their cinema displays. Thunderbolt will make this possible and the fact that they are using the same port is a good indication of the direction they are going with this. So for instance, buy a MacBook (pro/air) that has power friendly video. Plug it into your cinema display for higher end graphics and gaming. Just a hunch....

This was half promised with PCIe, but never materialised (not apple, in general I mean). I think apple will be able to give an idea like this legs due to the closed ecosystem. I would love some sort of monitor standard for this, maybe allowing slotin/plugin cards for upgradability.

Thunderbolt does carry the PCIe bus afterall, and 1st gen 10Gbps is enough, when we get to 2nd gen fibre it'll be even better!

I'll go with the more widely used USB 3.0 port over thunderbolt right now. Hp has said that it doesnt have any plans to adopt thunderbolt, and when the largest computer manufacturer in the world says that, then it means its not going to be a standard for a while. Only way thunderbolt has a chance to succeed in competing with USB 3.0 is if it is widely used, else it will be like firewire which will be used by mostly Graphics/Video/Audio developers/artists and be more of a complement to USB 3.0 then a replacement.

carson2255 said,
I'll go with the more widely used USB 3.0 port over thunderbolt right now. Hp has said that it doesnt have any plans to adopt thunderbolt, and when the largest computer manufacturer in the world says that, then it means its not going to be a standard for a while. Only way thunderbolt has a chance to succeed in competing with USB 3.0 is if it is widely used, else it will be like firewire which will be used by mostly Graphics/Video/Audio developers/artists and be more of a complement to USB 3.0 then a replacement.

Why does it matter? It's not as if there's just going to be space for just one port on the laptop.

Hmm. I do not mind someone developing thunderbolt and usb3 combined into one port where both stuffs just work, no matter what you plug in. Or happy to see 3 usb3 and 2 thunderbolt ports on laptops from now on.

Let the weaker standard disappear.

dogmai79 said,
I'm hoping Thunderbolt really takes off. I wanna see what it can really do.

All new Intel motherboards will not support Thunderbolt, nor USB 3.0. I wonder what those idiots are up to...

Luis Mazza said,

All new Intel motherboards will not support Thunderbolt, nor USB 3.0. I wonder what those idiots are up to...


+1

It always takes ages for stuff like this to go mainstream

"Thunderbolt's technology is a collaboration between Intel and Apple."
This is BS. Intel developed the tech, Apple simply licensed it.

ahhell said,
"Thunderbolt's technology is a collaboration between Intel and Apple."
This is BS. Intel developed the tech, Apple simply licensed it.

Because you were in the Lab.

ahhell said,
"Thunderbolt's technology is a collaboration between Intel and Apple."
This is BS. Intel developed the tech, Apple simply licensed it.

Because you were in the Lab.

ahhell said,
"Thunderbolt's technology is a collaboration between Intel and Apple."
This is BS. Intel developed the tech, Apple simply licensed it.
Intel and Apple both worked / collaborated on a version of Light Peak that uses copper (instead of optical) and provides power - which is now called Thunderbolt. So no, Apple didn't "simply licence it".

ahhell said,
"Thunderbolt's technology is a collaboration between Intel and Apple."
This is BS. Intel developed the tech, Apple simply licensed it.

No, it was a collaboration .

ahhell said,
"Thunderbolt's technology is a collaboration between Intel and Apple."
This is BS. Intel developed the tech, Apple simply licensed it.

Check your facts next time before talking BS yourself.