Office 2010 to Office 2013 update program details leaked?

Microsoft officially announced Office 2013 in July, as well as allowing people to download a free preview version of the software suite. But what about all those folks who still want to buy Office 2010 before Office 2013 launches? A new report claims to have leaked information from Microsoft on how they can upgrade to Office 2013.

ZDNet.com reports they have received information from an unnamed source that the Office 2010 update program to Office 2013 will begin on October 19th and end on April 30th, 2013. That means people who purchase versions of Office 2010 in that time period will be eligible for the update offer to Office 2013.

The report also contains screenshots that allegedly come from a Microsoft website that was briefly live before the company shut it down. One screenshot shows that folks who buy Office 2010 Home & Student, Home & Business 2010, and Professional 2010 will be able to get either Office 365 Home Premium or the 2013 version of their own software for free during the update time period. Office University 2010 and Mac University 2011 users can download Office 365 University for free but it is just a two year subscription for college students and faculty members. 

Finally, Office for Mac Home & Student 2011 and Office for Mac Home & Business 2011 will get Office 365 Home Premium for free, according to the screenshot. This would seem to confirm that Mac owners will be getting their own Office version soon-ish.

Another screenshot shows that Office 365 Home Premium will have a one year subscription and can be installed on up to five PCs or Macs, along with select drives. 2013 Office Suites versions are apparently just for PCs owners and will be more like the older retail versions of Office with no subscription but just one license for one PC. Microsoft has yet to confirm or deny any of this information.

Source: ZDNet | Images via ZDNet

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14 Comments

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According to the post it looks like Macs are not for business. Commercial use requires Office 2013 which, sorry Apple you can't work here.

Another version, another Apple afterthought.

hamslammer said,
They can stick that subscription crap where the sun don't shine!

There *will* be offers for Office 2013 upgrades - they haven't leaked yet. (However, expect little different from the older Office 2007->2010 upgrade offers.) Office has not, and likely won't, go entirely subscription. They are pushing Office365 (both directly and via their partners, such as Comcast) for reasons of expanding their hosted/SaaS revenue.

Why would you by 2010 Home & BUSINESS and then "upgrade" to 365 Home Premium which FORBIDS Business use, or "upgrade" to 365 home premium which will then expire after one year. I'm sure that a 365 subscription for 1-year is not going to be worth as much as a perpetual license of full version software.

Either it is FAKE or they really have not thought this through very well AT ALL.

Simon- said,
Why would you by 2010 Home & BUSINESS and then "upgrade" to 365 Home Premium which FORBIDS Business use, or "upgrade" to 365 home premium which will then expire after one year. I'm sure that a 365 subscription for 1-year is not going to be worth as much as a perpetual license of full version software.

Office 365 isn't just the software. It also comes with hosted Exchange, hosted SharePoint, etc. By itself with no software, these services currently cost $72 per year (business use permitted, though).

TomJones said,

Office 365 isn't just the software. It also comes with hosted Exchange, hosted SharePoint, etc. By itself with no software, these services currently cost $72 per year (business use permitted, though).

and Google offers them for free. why pay?

the420kid said,

and Google offers them for free. why pay?

Google doesn't offer hosted Exchange and SharePoint as far as I know. Also, if you're talking about Google Docs, I would hardly consider it the end-all spreadsheet/presentation/document solution. I'd recommend LibreOffice before that. At least the formatting stays consistent there when you try to do something even remotely complicated.

Students get this software cheaper anyway so for the people that need it they will proabably get their money's worth in a year or two.

the420kid said,

and Google offers them for free. why pay?


Google offers hosted exchange and hosted sharepoint? really?

Also does Google, as MS, promises us they are not using our files and data to use for 'advertising purposes'?

Its not free, you're paying for it, just not with money.

hin123 said,
and OpenOffice is free. why pay?

Slow. Typically uses 2X or more the resources. Missing features and functionality. Compatibility issues. Interface completely modernized in 1997. Wondering who's in charge every few months. Take your pick.

KSib said,

Google doesn't offer hosted Exchange and SharePoint as far as I know. Also, if you're talking about Google Docs, I would hardly consider it the end-all spreadsheet/presentation/document solution. I'd recommend LibreOffice before that. At least the formatting stays consistent there when you try to do something even remotely complicated.

Students get this software cheaper anyway so for the people that need it they will proabably get their money's worth in a year or two.

Also, notice that *all* that anyone has discussed is Office365 (the hosted service) - why is nobody discussing Office 2013 (the standalone productivity suite that will most likely be chosen by upgraders from Office 2010)? Despite the two versions being functionally identical (except for hosted services unique to Office365 subscriptions) some folks will choose Office 2013 for reasons of personal preference - I did, for example. Subscriptions (depending on the user) make sense (SMBs for example, using SaaS) - however, they aren't for all users.