My Linux Based Questions


Recommended Posts

+longgonebn

Your a genius. I didn't think that could have been a problem.

I am using PCManFM at the moment, and I tried launching the .deb file in default nautilus and it works like normal.

So I guess the question is, why is PCManFM having an issue and is there any solution? Not the biggest hassle to get these things installed obviously, but I would rather be able to do it from my choice of file manager.

Link to post
Share on other sites
ViperAFK

Your a genius. I didn't think that could have been a problem.

I am using PCManFM at the moment, and I tried launching the .deb file in default nautilus and it works like normal.

So I guess the question is, why is PCManFM having an issue and is there any solution? Not the biggest hassle to get these things installed obviously, but I would rather be able to do it from my choice of file manager.

pcmanfm does weird things with URI's apparently, its a nice file manager but its given me similar problems in the past (when I try to open a video from a mounted samba share in pcmanfm vlc would spit out a similar error, it would work fine in nautilus).

so it does sound you are indeed running into this bug: https://bugs.launchp...ter/+bug/752376 (pcmanfm is mentioned in the comments). What is strange is that according to the bug report software-center should now support this type of URI :/

EDIT: What version of ubuntu are you using? The fixed released note only mentioned quantal, it may not be fixed in 12.04 which would make sense as to why you still experience the issue.

I'd recommend giving gdebi a shot and see if it lets you open debs from pcmanfm, IMO gdebi is better than software-center for installing local .debs anyway, its much quicker. If it works you could set gdebi as the default for .debs and be good to go!

Link to post
Share on other sites
+longgonebn

pcmanfm does weird things with URI's apparently, its a nice file manager but its given me similar problems in the past (when I try to open a video from a mounted samba share in pcmanfm vlc would spit out a similar error, it would work fine in nautilus).

so it does sound you are indeed running into this bug: https://bugs.launchp...ter/+bug/752376 (pcmanfm is mentioned in the comments). What is strange is that according to the bug report software-center should now support this type of URI :/

EDIT: What version of ubuntu are you using? The fixed released note only mentioned quantal, it may not be fixed in 12.04 which would make sense as to why you still experience the issue.

I'd recommend giving gdebi a shot and see if it lets you open debs from pcmanfm, IMO gdebi is better than software-center for installing local .debs anyway, its much quicker. If it works you could set gdebi as the default for .debs and be good to go!

Yea I am on 12.04. If it's an issue that's not going to get fixed, I am ok with that. It's not that hard to open up Nautilus and run the .deb file. It's not like I need to do it all the time lol

I'm also not one for installing software that does the same thing as something else already installed, picky I know, but ya know.

Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
+longgonebn

How do I auto-mount drives on boot up? I have 4 internal media drives that need to be mounted automatically.

I have tried in the past and have caused issues with things. Easiest way possible?

Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Majesticmerc

I think they should be automatically mounted these days. Either way, if you have to manually mount an internal drive on boot, you can add it to your /etc/fstab file (Ubuntu info: 1, 2).

It goes without saying that you should be careful when editing your fstab file, as you can screw up your system with a bad fstab, although it's nothing that can't be recovered as long as you back up your original fstab.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+longgonebn

I believe fstab is the way I tried last time. So I'd rather avoid it this time if I could?..

*is this all I have to do?

up a terminal -


  • sudo blkid - note the UUID of the partition you want to mount.

  • sudo nano /etc/fstab - copy the following line to the end of the file - UUID=xxxxyyyy /path/to/partition (add ntfs-3g if it is an NTFS partition) uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser 0 0

  • Save the file and restart computer to check.

If so, /path/to/partition would be /media/Shows if that is my drive named Shows? Or is it looking for a full path? And that code doesn't change anything else about the drive right? Just that it now auto mounts on start up...

So for my Shows drive it would be..

UUID=0eaf61f0-f491-465b-af62-a59b350118c3 /media/Shows uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser 0

Right..?

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Majesticmerc

I think so, although I wouldn't call myself the king of fstab. You'd obviously need to create the directory /media/Shows in advance (as well as for the other drives). You should (IIRC) be able to simply check your changes by adding the line to /etc/fstab and then calling "sudo mount -a" and seeing if it mounts. If it doesn't adjust as necessary until it does.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+longgonebn

You just confused me.

My drives are mounted, because I clicked on it and mounted it.

What do you mean create the directory before hand....that is the directory of the drive??

Link to post
Share on other sites
ajcdotme

You just confused me.

My drives are mounted, because I clicked on it and mounted it.

What do you mean create the directory before hand....that is the directory of the drive??

Linux file systems are fairly object based in that a folder on one drive (or appearing there as viewed by the filesystem) can actually be a symlink to an entirely different folder. I generally like to mount a drive as an object, then create a base folder structure on it to link to... if this fits what you want to do, you've got a couple part process.

#1 for the sake of flexibility, I'd mount the drive under /mnt/drivename (pick one) instead of mounting directly to your filesystem.

#2, as Majesticmerc said, use your mounting in fstab so that if you break a mount point, you don't get locked out on reboot. unmount your drive, create the uuid entry in fstab (your line above looks correct to me, change out /media/Shows portion for /mnt/drivename from above.) then call sudo mount -a which should run through your fstab file and attempt mounts. if the feedback it gives you is confusing, just enter "show mount" in terminal and you should see your drive listed.

#3 sudo mkdir /mnt/drivename/Shows (actual data storage location)

#4 cd /media (puts you where you want to link)

#5 ln -s /mnt/drivename/Shows Shows (creates a symlink from this directory to the mounted drive, explicitly named)

I know this is more steps than are actually needed, but gives you the flexibility of moving other directories to the drive for additional storage if needed. for example, /mnt/drivename/Movies, and allowing you to keep the files separate. Personal preference, but I tend to try to error on the side of future flexibility.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+longgonebn

I honestly didn't understand any of that.

All I know is my drives are under /media and that's it. I don't really want to fiddle around. I guess I am stuck with manual mounting.

The problem is I have programs that have permissions to those locations, the drives as is, if I change something everything is messed up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Haggis

is it an external drive?

so say you want to mount it to /home/shows

i would try adding

UUID=xxxxyyyy /home/shows ext4 defaults 0 0

change the ext4 if its a different type

for example this is my fstab


UUID=55863616-9993-484a-8112-644e48540019 / ext4 discard,noatime,nodiratime,defaults 1 1
UUID=a413c0d4-5583-42f4-88b1-413e950ee0bd /boot ext4 discard,noatime,nodiratime,defaults 1 2
UUID=bfbcfd6d-2d47-46f0-ba15-cba0bc5ccfbe /home ext4 discard,noatime,nodiratime,defaults 1 2
UUID=1ec148df-8757-4980-a242-f95c40068194 /swap ext4 discard,noatime,nodiratime,defaults 1 2
none /tmp tmpfs defaults 0 0
/dev/sda1 /home/haggis/Storage ext4 defaults 0 0
[/CODE]

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Majesticmerc

You just confused me.

My drives are mounted, because I clicked on it and mounted it.

What do you mean create the directory before hand....that is the directory of the drive??

Drives must be mounted in a specific directory, and that directory must exist beforehand. Now if you're mounting the drive through your file browser (e.g. Nautilus, Dolphin, Thunar, PCManFM, etc), this directory will be created automatically, and deleted when you unmount the drive. If you want to mount the drive manually at boot-time, you'll have to create these directories inside /media using mkdir as a super user (i.e. root) while the drives are already unmounted.

Next, create the fstab lines as discussed, and use the "mount -a" command (or mount /media/Shows) as super user to test your fstab. Once everything is working your disks should be mounted on boot.

I'd recommend taking a look at this article on the Arch Linux wiki for a bit more insight on working with fstab: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Fstab. It's not Arch specific, and very informative IMO.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Farchord

I honestly didn't understand any of that.

All I know is my drives are under /media and that's it. I don't really want to fiddle around. I guess I am stuck with manual mounting.

The problem is I have programs that have permissions to those locations, the drives as is, if I change something everything is messed up.

Heh I'll add a little note to try to relieve your confusion.

In linux, EVERYTHING in your computer is a device. Everything is in /dev. But it's not as simple as opening something up in /dev, it has to be 'mounted', or 'interpreted' with the proper driver.

Now, in Ubuntu, most drives are automatically mounted once you click them in the file manager (And maybe enter your administrator password).

So like the guys are trying to explain before me, if you want to force mount a drive on boot, you need to first make a folder anywhere (Although it's probably better for organisation-sake if you just create one in /media, but that's up to you) and then add the fstab line they mentionned earlier.

To create a folder in anywhere but /home, do sudo mkdir /path/directory (For example, sudo mkdir /media/musicdrive).

Link to post
Share on other sites
+longgonebn

So right now I manually mount my drive from within PCManFM. Which creates

/media/Media

/media/Shows

/media/Movies

/media/Films

If I want that to happen automatically on start up I would want to unmount the drives and do this.

sudo mkdir /media/Media

sudo mkdir /media/Shows

sudo mkdir /media/Movies

sudo mkdir /media/Films

Then add this line for each at the end of fstab.

UUID=0eaf61f0-f491-465b-af62-a59b350118c3 /media/Shows uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser

Then do mount -a to test the new mount points before rebooting? (And no these are all internal drives)

Correct?

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Majesticmerc

That is correct, although obviously the uuids will be different. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
+longgonebn

If something on my system, a program, uses those drives, accesses /media/Shows etc all the time.

Once this is done, will that program still be able to do that, or will I need to re-add the directory to the application?

I assume it's going to be the same, but want to make sure.

Link to post
Share on other sites
srbeen

I found a ubuntu bug where if you try to install ubuntu over an already installed ubuntu, theres absolutely no problem seeing the wifi password in the clear provided an account has wifi setup on the machine, without entering any user account infos or anything. It pops up during the install for downloading updates... Discovered by accident due to bad installed graphic drivers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+longgonebn

I just followed the instructions, when I do sudo mount -a I get the following

mount: unknown filesystem type 'nouser'

mount: unknown filesystem type 'nouser'

mount: unknown filesystem type 'nouser'

mount: unknown filesystem type 'nouser'

Do I need to put ext4 somewhere in those lines?

Like I have

UUID=12498dda-899a-4e48-9d6e-a5372340f3dd /media/Movies uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser 0

Should I put

UUID=12498dda-899a-4e48-9d6e-a5372340f3dd /media/Movies ext4 uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser 0

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Majesticmerc

I just followed the instructions, when I do sudo mount -a I get the following

mount: unknown filesystem type 'nouser'

mount: unknown filesystem type 'nouser'

mount: unknown filesystem type 'nouser'

mount: unknown filesystem type 'nouser'

Do I need to put ext4 somewhere in those lines?

Like I have

UUID=12498dda-899a-4e48-9d6e-a5372340f3dd /media/Movies uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser 0

Should I put

UUID=12498dda-899a-4e48-9d6e-a5372340f3dd /media/Movies ext4 uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser 0

Sorry, I missed that in your fstab line. Yes, you'll need to add your file system with the line (Linux doesn't/can't autodetect in most cases). Using your example above, you'll need a line like this:

UUID=0eaf61f0-f491-465b-af62-a59b350118c3   /media/Shows	ext4	uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser	 0   0
                                                                 ^                                                                   ^
                                                                 |                                                                   |
                                                          File system here                                                    Pass value here

This assumes that your file system is ext4. You'll need to change this depending on the file system (e.g. ntfs-3g, ext3, etc)

Once your drive is automounting, you shouldn't need to do anything to your application, but get back to us if you get stuck of course :)

(Edited: Alignment)

Link to post
Share on other sites
+longgonebn

So not where I put ext4, move that to after nouser? Why do you have two 0s at the end now?

Also don't know what any of the code means, I found an example somewhere, so not sure if any of it is correct for me.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Majesticmerc

I've fixed the alignment in the example. The file system type goes after the mount directory (e.g. /media/Shows ext4). The second zero is the "pass" value, it just tells fstab that it doesn't need to check the file system at boot time, and just to mount it. This is the default I think, but you should include it anyway to be sure.

I used the format described on the arch wiki:

<file system>        <dir>         <type>    <options>             <dump> <pass>

(link: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Fstab#File_example

Link to post
Share on other sites
+longgonebn

I now have this

UUID=12498dda-899a-4e48-9d6e-a5372340f3dd /media/Movies ext4 uid=1000,gid=1000,umask=0022,sync,auto,nosuid,rw,nouser 0 0

Correct?

Link to post
Share on other sites
firey

looks right to me. Ensure you have a /meda/Movies folder and it should work.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Majesticmerc

Looks good :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By zikalify
      Canonical announces full enterprise support for Kubernetes 1.21
      by Paul Hill



      Canonical, the firm behind the Ubuntu operating system, has announced full enterprise support for Kubernetes 1.21. It said that support ranges from public cloud to edge and covers Charmed Kubernetes, MicroK8s, and kubeadm. According to Canonical, MicroK8s is suited for workstations, DevOps, edge and IoT, Charmed Kubernetes is aimed at multi-cloud clusters, and kubeadm is designed for manual operations.

      Notable changes in Kubernetes 1.21 include a memory manager which will improve the performance of some applications, new scheduler features, improvements to ReplicateSet downscaling, support for indexed jobs, and the deprecation of Pod Security Policy before its complete removal in Kubernetes 1.25.

      Commenting on the launch of Kubernetes 1.21, Canonical Product Manager Alex Chalkias said:

      Enterprise support for Kubernetes on Ubuntu is provided by Canonical as a part of the Ubuntu Advantage for Infrastructure (UA-I) support subscription. The package includes long-term security maintenance, kernel Livepatching, and mission-critical infrastructure support for the full stack from the kernel to the container across public clouds, Vmware, OpenStack, and bare metal.

      In terms of product releases from Canonical, this month is turning out to be a bit busy. On the first day of the month, Canonical launched Ubuntu 21.04 beta and is intending to release the finished product on April 22.

    • By zikalify
      Canonical releases Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo beta
      by Paul Hill

      Canonical has announced the availability of Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo beta for Desktop, Server, and Cloud. There are also downloadable beta images of alternative Ubuntu flavours including Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu.

      The main Ubuntu 21.04 for Desktop is quite a good release this time around; it includes the newer 5.11 Linux kernel so more hardware will be supported and Canonical has switched to Wayland sessions by default away from X.org. Unlike Fedora 34, Canonical has decided to stick with GNOME 3.38 so that it can adapt its desktop extensions to work properly with GNOME 40.

      In its announcement, Canonical said:

      If you’d like to take Ubuntu 21.04 beta for a spin before the final release drops on April 22, head over to the mailing list announcement where you can find the links to all of the available Ubuntu 21.04 beta editions and flavours. Keep in mind that this software is still in development and you could run into bugs. If you do, you can report them to Canonical so they can be fixed before the final release later this month.

    • By zikalify
      Linux Mint outlines better, unobtrusive update notifications
      by Paul Hill



      Clem Lefebvre, head of the Linux Mint project, has written a blog post outlining new notifications that try not to be annoying but also remind users that they need to perform software updates to keep their computer secure. The details arrive a little over a month since Lefebvre pointed to stats that show some users were not applying security updates and in some cases, people were even running end of life versions of Linux Mint.

      The Linux Mint team prides itself on its users controlling their computer rather than the other way around. New Mint versions only ever introduce conservative changes so that the whole operating system doesn’t need to be relearned and users are also given complete control over when, how, and which updates are installed; unfortunately, this mindset has led to some users running outdated, vulnerable software.



      To remedy the issue, a new pop-up has been created which lets the user know how many updates are available, it says why updates need to be applied, it lets users view available updates, and gives users the option to turn on automatic updates. If the user dismisses the notification it will come back two days later so it’s not overbearing.

      If the user decides to install updates, the notification will disappear for quite a while on the default settings. By default, the notification will appear if an update has been available for more than seven logged-in days or if it’s older than 15 calendar days. The number of days can be changed to anything between two and 90 days depending on how often you want to see updates. Additionally, these notifications will only be triggered by security and kernel updates but this can be adjusted in the settings.

      There is also a grace period setting which is set to 30 days by default, essentially, this means that if an update has been applied in the last 30 days, you will not be bugged by notifications until that time has elapsed.

      The Mint team hopes that the default settings will work for most people in that they keep their system moderately up-to-date without being overburdened with constant reminders to update their machine. The new notifications are set to arrive in Linux Mint 20.2 but Lefebvre has also said that it could be backported to older versions.

    • By zikalify
      Debian 10.9 released with updates to popular packages
      by Paul Hill

      Image via Alex Makas The Debian project has announced the availability of Debian 10.9. The new ISO image, which can be used to install Debian, comes with all the latest package updates which will save you time when installing the operating system on a computer. If you already have Debian 9 installed on your computer, there is no need to download Debian 10.9, simply apply any available updates to your system and you’ll be on the latest release.

      Commenting on the launch, the project said:

      Some of the packages that are updated in Debian 10.9 include LibreOffice, the Linux kernel, Python, Firefox ESR, Chromium, and Tor. The Debian installer has also been updated to include the latest fixes.

      Debian 10 was first released on July 6, 2019, and will continue to receive updates until 2024. As big Debian releases come out every two years, we should see Debian 11 at some point this year but so far no release date has been given. Upon release, Debian 10 will be demoted from Stable to Old Stable with Debian 9 being cut off from updates in mid-2022.

    • By zikalify
      Tails 4.17 launched with improved upgrade process
      by Paul Hill



      The team behind the privacy-oriented operating system, Tails, has launched Tails 4.17. This update includes several important updates to key packages such as the Tor Browser which are essential for maintaining your privacy but it also comes with several improvements to the upgrade process which should result in less failed upgrades.

      The first of the reliability improvements to automatic upgrades pertains to the file system. The release notes state that automatic updates were previously failing because of an unclean file system. To address this, Tails now automatically repairs the file system being used during an upgrade to eliminate the issue.

      Another change to improve upgrade reliability is the download process of new updates. Each Tails upgrade requires the users to download the new image over Tails’ Tor connection which can sometimes be spotty. With Tails 4.17, downloads will now automatically resume if they do stop so it’ll save users a lot of time.

      In terms of new package updates, the Tor Browser has been updated to 10.0.14, Thunderbird has been bumped to 78.8.0, Tor is now on 0.4.5.7, the GRUB bootloader is on 2.04-16, and several firmware packages that improve Intel, Broadcom, and Cypress interfaces have been included too.

      If you’re running Tails 4.14 or above you will get a notification telling you to update your system as soon as you connect to the internet. If you do not yet have a Tails USB to boot from but would like one, you can find instructions on downloading and installing Tails on the project’s website.