Windows TCPIP Stack Based on Unix ?


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YesYes please verify :D

I want to know for certain before i go and completely Destroy a few peoples arguments based on this information

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Windows' TCP/IP stack is indeed based on the TCP/IP stack from *BSD. I got it confirmed secondhand from a leading developer at Microsoft who attended a *BSD event.

However, Microsoft is apparently coming out with a new TCP/IP stack in Vista, and I believe at least one version of IIS comes with its own TCP/IP stack (since they goofed the TCP/IP stack in Windows causing it to suffer in case you have MANY connections). I do not know whether these TCP/IP stacks have the same heritage.

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I've heard that the the TCP/IP stack is borrowed straight from BSD, so yes.

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That is true of the released Windows versions that I know about. (XP, not 100% sure, but I think so)

Based off of BSD, and properly includes the copyright information that Berkeley requires.

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yes, WinSock is pretty much a direct implementation of BSD sockets, and all the utilities (ping, traceert, etc.) are ports of the BSD utilities.

if you look at the string resources, you will find the BSD copyright.

unfortunatley, while BSD Sockets are great, windows version of them are bad :no:

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That is true of the released Windows versions that I know about.  (XP, not 100% sure, but I think so)

Based off of BSD, and properly includes the copyright information that Berkeley requires.

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Absolutely confirmed, MarkJ

:yes:

Vista has a totally new TCP/IP Stack as well.

--ScottKin

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The IP Stack was based upon a Unix Stack, which was owned by MS. MS tinkered and castrated the stack for he workstation versions only. They did optimize it in the Windows 2003 releases, and will have a full replacement for Vista and Longhorn server.

Most forget that MS one sold a version of Unix call Xenix. The purchased a lot of the ATT rights and patents, and then CYA, (a legal move more then anything) with the SCO lawsuit.

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The IP Stack was based upon a Unix Stack, which was owned by MS.

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While Microsoft did technically 'buy' their TCP/IP stack from Spider Systems, they did not "own" it. Spider used the code available and written for BSD, so it doesn't appear that Microsoft directly copied BSD code (which, again, it is perfectly legal and legitimate to copy), they got it from a third party. Also ftp, rcp and rsh seems to have come with the bundle. I have heard that ftp was, but have never used rcp and rsh on Windows, so don't know what version(s) those were or were not included in any particular Windows version.

Anyone can look through the .exes for those files and look for "The Regents of the University of California" copyright notice, if they want to see for themselves (rather than take the word of some anonymous geeks on a forum) ;)

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MS recieved and owned the rights for the code that was used in Xenix, that it had recieved from ATT, read the docs on the MS 'Settlement' in which MS paid SCO a 'fee' to cover the rest of the code they did not, in exchange MS granted full access to there libary of code on Unix to SCO, (increased the base code that SCO could use for sueing over, since they now had full rights, and not just limited).

Spider may have orginal written the code, but MS based the IP stack on Xenix code, which still had other copywrite codes attached. MS did own the code, and they did and still do hold a large peice of the ATT - Unix code rights that they purchased.

They did not use the code base for OS/2, which had it own IP stack from IBM.

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