There are many great features available to you once you register at Neowin, including:

  • Richer content, access to many features that are disabled for guests like commenting on the front page
  • Access to a great community, with a massive database of experience on hard & software issues, gaming and recreational activities, and more
  • Access to the Neowin IRC - you could make a friend from across the world and talk to them live
  • Access to Neowin contests & subscription offers and forums that are not open to guests/li>
  • It's simple, and FREE! · Register here

[Formula 1] F1 agrees to delay engine rules to 2014


 Share

Recommended Posts

F1 agrees to delay engine rules to 2014

Formula 1 chiefs have agreed to delay the introduction of new engine regulations until 2014, in a move that will see the sport switch to 1.6-litre V6 turbo engines.

As AUTOSPORT revealed earlier today, F1's manufacturers tabled a proposal at Wednesday's meeting of the Formula 1 Commission to move away from the plans to have four-cylinder turbo engines from 2013.

That four-cylinder concept had divided opinions among the car makers and, after intense efforts between them and the teams, a proposal was put together for V6s to be introduced from 2014 - with them still featuring the 'green' hybrid systems that the FIA is so keen to see.

The manufacturers' proposal received the necessary agreement in the F1 Commission, which is made up of the teams and other representatives from the sport, and it will now go to a fax vote of the FIA's World Motor Sport Council.

With the WMSC having made it clear it was willing to consider a delay to the original 2013 plans if there was a push from the sport's competitors, getting the official sign off is likely to be a formality.

The late effort to find a deal on future engine regulations comes after an intense debate over the past few weeks about a way forward for the sport.

Ferrari was against the idea of four-cylinder engines, while Mercedes-Benz and Cosworth had expressed reservations about the costs involved of developing the new designs.

Only Renault was in favour of the move, and its managing director Jean-Francois Caubet had warned that the future of the French car manufacturer in F1 depended on the engine regulations changing.

"I told Bernie and Jean Todt that today we are in the 'red zone' because we have no idea what will be the future for Renault," he told AUTOSPORT in Canada.

However, keen to help do what was best for the sport, Renault also agreed to the V6 concept that now looks set to be incorporated into the regulations.

Source: Autosport

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I find myself divided over this. On the one hand, I want to see "the pinnacle of motorsport" with the fastest cars and the latest technology. I want to see the innnovation from the teams each year as they try and squeeze the best out of their cars. Big engines that are noisy and cars that are fast.

We know how all this eventually filters-down into everyday production cars, so on the other hand I can't help feeling that using engines which are more akin to everyday production cars could be better for the car manufacturers and us, the buying public. Of course, even using V6 engines, some of that knowledge is still going to make it's way into your family saloon, but maybe if F1 did use a more conventional (and greener :rolleyes: ) four-cylinder engine, that technology would arrive sooner and more cheaply.

But would it still be F1? Could that still be classed as "the best" in motorsport?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank f**k for that ... you can't beat the sound of the current 2.4 V8s ...... they are amazing...

Well the 3.0 V10s were better for a start, but I get your point that the only way is down for cylinder counts and nothing will sound as good.

I'm glad they've delayed it a year and are seriously considering the V6 option, but it will go down to 4 cylinders eventually.

At least we have the 2.4 V8s until the end of the BBC coverage. By the sounds of it they won't seek to renew it, and when it goes to Sky Sports I'll force myself to lose interest in the sport because I'm not paying extra to watch it. Then they can do whatever they want with the regulations.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well the 3.0 V10s were better for a start, but I get your point that the only way is down for cylinder counts and nothing will sound as good.

I'm glad they've delayed it a year and are seriously considering the V6 option, but it will go down to 4 cylinders eventually.

At least we have the 2.4 V8s until the end of the BBC coverage. By the sounds of it they won't seek to renew it, and when it goes to Sky Sports I'll force myself to lose interest in the sport because I'm not paying extra to watch it. Then they can do whatever they want with the regulations.

Agreed. The BBC provide a superb coverage..much better than ITV who used to break in between laps for commercials.....

I must say that Martin Brundle is a legend! If the contract does go to Sky Sports, I hope they make an offer for him. I don't really rate the others (especially EJ). Don't know if any others of you have noticed, but Jeremy Clarkson has been around and mentioned over the last few GPs. Wonder if he's in the line-up to provide commentary on the F1 -- that would be fantastic!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agreed. The BBC provide a superb coverage..much better than ITV who used to break in between laps for commercials.....

I must say that Martin Brundle is a legend! If the contract does go to Sky Sports, I hope they make an offer for him. I don't really rate the others (especially EJ). Don't know if any others of you have noticed, but Jeremy Clarkson has been around and mentioned over the last few GPs. Wonder if he's in the line-up to provide commentary on the F1 -- that would be fantastic!

Clarkson would be a poor commentator. He's never done any form of colour commentating and I think his attention span would mean he would talk crap for most of the race. MB/DC is a brilliant line up, both well informed and collectively have vast racing experience, and can hold an audience when there's nothing going on (like the 2 hour break in the Canada GP). EJ is an odd character and I think you need that in a pundit, having a bunch of guys with the same background, same character and same opinions is boring. The BBC coverage is top rate since they got rid of Legard and it would be criminal if they changed any of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It'll stay with BBC for years, FIA said F1 must be free for everyone to watch, with rules out monopoly Sky.

I'm quite glad that there not going to change the engines. I absolutely love F1 but some things they say annoys me. They always push for F1 to be cheaper, so why on earth do they keep changing the rules and possibly the engine, forcing teams to invest in MILLIONS on making new parts, new engines. Just keep the rules as they are noew and lock them for 2 years. The top teams will always be the top teams, so forcing new rules isn't suddently going to make Virgin Racing the top contenders, it'll never happen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm quite glad that there not going to change the engines. I absolutely love F1 but some things they say annoys me. They always push for F1 to be cheaper, so why on earth do they keep changing the rules and possibly the engine, forcing teams to invest in MILLIONS on making new parts, new engines. Just keep the rules as they are noew and lock them for 2 years. The top teams will always be the top teams, so forcing new rules isn't suddently going to make Virgin Racing the top contenders, it'll never happen

The engine change isn't mainly a cost saving proposition as far as I understand, it is their push for a more "green" F1. Basically they want to have a environmental friendly and fuel efficient solution and push for technology and evolution that can get transferred down to standard cars too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is all good being green, but at some point, you have to stop. Far as I'm concern, engines should be powerful as they are safe and reliable, I think currently we have that. F1 should really be green in the KERs aspect, as in newer ways to regenerate energy and I will leave it at that. If they can have regulations for a greener engine, then go ahead but downsizing on current technology is absolutely pointless, changing for the sake of changing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Smaller is always more efficient, in both Electronics and Mechanics.

I don't agree with what you are saying about it being change for the sake of change. They have stated their reasons.

I do however lament the change :(

Also, imagine if they can get the same mind boggling performance out of a 6cylinder engine? Imagine getting one of them in your car :p Soon people will be drag racing Prius' (and winning :p).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's official now:

FIA rubber-stamps new 1.6-litre V6 engine plans to be introduced in 2014

Formula 1 will officially switch to a 1.6-litre V6 engine format from 2014 after proposals finalised by the sport's stakeholders during last weekend's European Grand Prix were rubber-stamped by the FIA's World Motor Sport Council on Wednesday.

According to a statement from the sport's governing body, WMSC members agreed in a fax vote to formalise the new turbo-charged engines, which will feature energy recovery units.

The statement read: "Following a fax vote by its members, the World Motor Sport Council has ratified the engine regulations recently drawn up in consultation with the main stakeholders in Formula One.

"The new power plant will be a V6 1.6 turbo unit with energy recovery systems. This new formula will come into effect as from the start of the 2014 FIA Formula One World Championship season."

F1's teams and the FIA were in deadlock over the engine situation for several weeks until agreement was reached during a Formula 1 Commission meeting prior to the European Grand Prix weekend to delay introducing the regulations by a year to 2014.

The new plans also featured a change in the format from a four cylinder engine to a six cylinder unit - Ferrari having been against the former on marketing grounds. Mercedes and Cosworth had also voiced concerns about development costs. F1 technical chiefs then met in Valencia to give their formal backing to the V6, 1.6-litre plan.

The teams indicated after the Valencia gathering that they would ask for a rise in the proposed rev limit of 12,000rpm to 15,000rpm. It remains unclear whether this was included in the ratified plans. Similarly it is not known whether a request to delay the introduction of new chassis rules set for 2013 - to coincide with the new engine plan - has been successful.

Source: Autosport

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.