Adding a dedicated graphics card to HP probook 4530s


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Koshur

Hi

I have an HP Probook 4530s

i7,2630QM, Quad Core,

8GB Ram

Intel HD 3000 as graphics.

Can i add a dedicated graphics card in this if it has the required slots? Also will it also adjust for the power requirements if its possible ?

Is this possible to do firstly?

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Biohead

As a rule of thumb with laptops, if it comes with integrated graphics, you're stuck with integrated graphics.

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Wakers

That won't have a slot for a graphics card.

Laptops will let you upgrade memory and often hard drives, but I struggle to think of even a gaming laptop that will let you swap graphics chips - let alone a model that doesn't even have one installed to begin with.

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c3ntury

It's possible, but frankly, it's a pain in the arse.

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ShMaunder

This probably will require a soldering gun, a new BIOS and a new cooling system - not worth it.

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neufuse

at one point there was an idea for swappable graphics cards on laptops, dont think it ever really took off though

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Koshur

:/ :( :/ :/ :/ :/ :/ :/ :/ :/ :/ :/ :/ :/ :/

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rkenshin

neufuse, you beat me to it. I was going to ask whatever happened to that.

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Wakers

neufuse, you beat me to it. I was going to ask whatever happened to that.

Didn't someone launch an external graphics card or some such?

They were incredibly expensive, incredibly inefficient solutions from what I remember seeing of them.

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S550

There are adapters for some machines that allow use of a regular desktop GPU.

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Koshur

There are adapters for some machines that allow use of a regular desktop GPU.

Are they out in market?? Can they work for my laptop? DO u mean Express slot or something similar?

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S550

Some use express slots, others use docking ports. There aren't many though.

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neufuse

neufuse, you beat me to it. I was going to ask whatever happened to that.

I guess you could kinda blame Apple, their push towards small non-changable items kinda killed it... everyone wanted to be smaller and have less options (OEM wise)

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tsupersonic

This is why you do your research before you buy the laptop...You don't ever want to consider upgrading anything in the laptop, unless it involves memory or a HDD/SSD.

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  • 5 months later...
willpower101

This thread has a lot of mis-information and links from google. So I created an account to help educated those that come hear and read this bad info.

There are two types of chips in laptops: A socketed chip, and a BGA or ball grid array. BGA chips are typically what you find in game consoles, netbooks, apple systems, desktop north and south bridges, on board memory, video cards, etc. They have hundreds of tiny solder balls, directly soldered onto the board like this. http://img.tfd.com/cde/_BGA.GIF

Now, In most laptops BGA's are the default for the video card, but there are many exceptions to this as well as some interesting options.

Also it's important to note that tsupersonic and others are incorrect about upgrades on a laptop. There are several things you can upgrade easily, just like in a desktop, including the processor, sometimes the video card, the keyboard, and the display.

Laptop processors are rarely BGA and a quick jaunt over to the specsheets linked on wikipedia will tell you which are and which aren't. With this in mind, you can upgrade any laptop processor to any other laptop processor assuming the socket and fsb match, JUST like in a pc. I'm currently running a 2ghz T7200 @ 667fsb (the max supported on this laptop's chipset) upgraded from a 533fsb t5200 @ 1.6ghz. They're simply both socket M.

Another example of this is my roomate's probook 4530s. It came stock with a core i5 and we upgraded him to a QUAD core i7 2730QM, simply required popping off the back case, heat sync, and new thermal paste.

Display upgrades are also pretty common. Little do most know, there are only a grand total of maybe 10 major LCD Panel component manufacturers and many of them are interchangeable. Also, the connectors are actually ISO standardized, so there are only a few different connectors and they are indeed interchangeable as long as your video card supports the resolution and refresh rate of the panel.

But this thread was originally about video cards, so lets focus on that.

There is INDEED a swappable and upgradeable video card alive and kicking in several machines.

These are called MXM cards, or Mobile PCI Express Module.

You can see plenty of them on ebay and just buy your upgrade if you have the slot for it http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=mxm+card&_sacat=175673&_odkw=mxm&_osacat=175673

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mobile_PCI_Express_Module#2nd_generation_configurations_.28MXM_3.29

Now, the 4530s is an interesting beast...

It seems that people around here don't realize that sandy bridge mobile chipsets actually contain the video card ON the die of the processor. It's speculated by many that ivey bridge upgrades to the same slot should be able to support a video upgrade.

As for the on-board, or 'discrete' graphics card, the hp probook series, like many others, have a standard BGA chip for the NVIDIA GPU. There is one way to upgrade though... And not, you don't have the tools to solder a BGA chip, look up the cost of a reflow station. You can swap motherboards with one that has the supported card. Keep everything else, including your processor, and just find a mobo on ebay with the nvidia gpu.

Now, some people mentioned external video card adapters!

There is a thing called eGPU that is so big it's even got it's own sub-forum over at notebookreview.com

The layman's guide is here http://www.notebookreview.com/default.asp?newsID=5846&review=how+to+upgrade+laptop+graphics+notebook

But the real technical thread, with over 1000 pages when you're not signed in, is right here http://forum.notebookreview.com/e-gpu-external-graphics-discussion/418851-diy-egpu-experiences.html

and guess what laptop is on the list of successful eGPU mods?

A 4530s.

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support@theimagenarypress.

-Resident One Post Wonder

I just want to say I registered with neowin.net just to acknowledge you and your excellent response/write-up on answering the question of upgrading the graphics on an HP Probook 4530s. Wow, thank you for doing such great research and laying it out in such an easy and enjoyable format for reading. You are truly a great being. (quote from the story of Jumping Mouse from "Seven Arrows.")

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