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[Network]Fibre Optics


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leesmithg

Today B.T. Open Reach installed a fibre optic connection in my home.

However there seems to be a problem.

The engineer tells me that from the socket his equipment says 40mbs-1 speed, however my PC tells me 15mbs-1.

So does anyone have some advice on why this is happening and maybe a remedy on how to get the full whack speed of 40mbs-1?

I understand there maybe a training period, however if the socket reaches 40mbs-1 then I should expect my PC to.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

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Daedroth

I presume that the Fibre comes into the home and goes into a modem/router. Then comes from that via Ethernet or wireless to your PC.

How are you connecting to your modem/router?

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Crisp

To get full speed, always test via ethernet. Also you wont get 40Mbps, it'll be under.

Sounds like FTTC too.

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Singh400

AFAIK the training period when dealing with FTTC/FFTP on BT Infinity is a myth. If your socket is getting full speed, but your PC isn't that indicates a problem with your local network/wiring setup.

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Storm

40mbp is the SYNC speed...

the same as adsl, just because you sync at that speed doesnt mean youll get anywhere near..

I have a 40/10 FTTC connection, and can download at 4.5MB/s

This is due to be getting upgraded to 80/20 next week, so that should theortically double, as im pretty much next to the cabinet.

Also, what you have to remember, when using the speedtests such as speedtest.net, your relying on the upload of the serer, and how many people are using it

It might not work straitght away, but when it does, use http://www.speedtester.bt.com/

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ZakO

How are you testing your speed? Are you connected via wifi or ethernet?

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Crisp

I have a 40/10 FTTC connection, and can download at 4.5MB/s

Do you mean Mb? If so, you have a problem there...

Atleast from my understanding as I thought BT wouldn't offer Infinity if the speed was less than 15Mb as it would be too low for them to offer it as "Infinity".

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Storm

Do you mean Mb? If so, you have a problem there...

Atleast from my understanding as I thought BT wouldn't offer Infinity if the speed was less than 15Mb as it would be too low for them to offer it as "Infinity".

Your getting confused,

your sync speed is in Mb

Your download speed is MB

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Daedroth

Do you mean Mb? If so, you have a problem there...

Atleast from my understanding as I thought BT wouldn't offer Infinity if the speed was less than 15Mb as it would be too low for them to offer it as "Infinity".

A 40Mb/s Internet connection can download at 5MB/s.

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Crisp

Your getting confused,

your sync speed is in Mb

Your download speed is MB

Sorry, I've always used Megabit as my speed.

Anyway, back on topic...

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leesmithg

I presume that the Fibre comes into the home and goes into a modem/router. Then comes from that via Ethernet or wireless to your PC.

How are you connecting to your modem/router?

Yes.

Wireless.

Test results.

post-66351-0-63254100-1334836931.png

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ZakO

Test it again via an ethernet cable. That will tell you if you've actually got problems with the fibre connection, or just bad wireless throughput.

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smooth_criminal1990

Wireless.

post-66351-0-63254100-1334836931.png

There's yer problem! Wireless throughput varies a lot in my experience

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Groovedude

do you have a machine in the house thats connected via ethernet ??

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Daedroth

Ethernet is the surest way to test throughput.

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Singh400

Eurgh, stop using wireless. Get it wired (RJ45). Do a speedtest on Speedtest.net and report back here with the results.

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hjf288

Sorry, I've always used Megabit as my speed.

Anyway, back on topic...

Remember the rule.. little b is bit, Big B is Byte..

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Storm

Indeed, dont use wireless, its got too many varying factors.

its like trying to speedtest a car down the m1 at rush hour, you can only go as fast as the cars infront ;)

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Crisp

Remember the rule.. little b is bit, Big B is Byte..

I know the rule, it's just myself and everyone I know always uses Megabit (Mb) to measure their speed, rather than Megabyte (MB).

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leesmithg

Hello again.

I decided to update the wireless card drivers.

Driver Magician told me I needed v10.

It helped.

I now touch 32mbs-1.

I was originally told 34 was available, engineer said 40, when I get the double bubble for free upgrade then I might get around 70.

I will look at some more tweaking though.

Thanks for comments.

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