Rate Ubuntu 12.04 LTS


  

109 members have voted

You do not have permission to vote in this poll, or see the poll results. Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

Recommended Posts

Kreuger

I can't vote. I have no interest in using Windows but Ubuntu surely isn't perfect.

Link to post
Share on other sites
ShMaunder

Crippled my HP Laserjet's at work. :/

See's the printers fine. But nothing prints. Happens on multiple printers and machines. Le'Sigh.

I'm not sure what the cause is. Though I also have the same problem since 11.04(ish). Can't print to a USB Samsung Laser printer nor to a Networked HP Colour Laserjet. It says it has successfully printed, but nothing happens except sometimes a light flashes on the Laserjet then stops.

I have resorted (been forced) to not printing which is better on the wallet and the environment.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
pwnz0r3d

I don't like either Unity or the new HUD, so I've gone Mint instead, although I don't know what the hell is going on with the dual panels in Lisa :wacko: Running LXDE till they decide on cleaning up the mess.

Link to post
Share on other sites
n_K

Anyone got any screenshots of 12.04? Not really interested in installing it (plus only have 300MB free on /) but would like to see what it now looks like.

Link to post
Share on other sites
LargeLarry

Disclaimer: this is my opinion only.

I tried a few linux distros and started using Ubuntu about 2006. I really liked the direction it was going. Every new version made improvements.Then they decided to move the window buttons to the left side. Ok, i'll just switch it back. Then they introduced Unity. Ok, i'll log in with gnome. Then they removed that option and lost me. I tried 12.04 and it's just not for me. It's a great distro for beginners, and I rate it a 7 out of 10. I subtract 3 for Unity. lol

I learned a lot from using Ubuntu and I give them credit for introducing people to linux. I think everyone reaches a point where they want their system set up a certain way and move on to another distro. I moved to Arch linux and it's been a good experience.

Also: If Steam and valve games are released for linux, that would be the most awesome thing in a long time. I hope the rumours are true. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Sadelwo

12.04 is the first time I've installed Ubuntu on bare metal since version 6. it's easy to set up and supports all the hardware on a Dell Inspiron 531 I put it on. Getting software is real easy (no more apt) and it's pretty much smooth sailing. I boot into this machine just becasue I like the feel of something different but works.

Also: If Steam and valve games are released for linux, that would be the most awesome thing in a long time. I hope the rumours are true. :)

Once Unreal Engine, CryEngine and Frostbite 2.0 can be converted, I don't see any limitations.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Freelancer1111

I set up Ubuntu in a Virtual Maschine and I'm impressed how smooth it runs even in there.

Glad to see Rhythmbox coming back as Music Player, and there are also nice visuals as far as I can see in my VM.

While I miss the "old" software center from 11.xx versions, I still can't get many windows applications to work with Wine or PlayOnLinux.

It seems, to me, that the Ubuntu creators are changing their distro to a very new user friendly way, which I don't like as the versions I tried before :(

I would give a solid 7 to this Version, but I believe if I install Ubuntu directly on my PC, it will even better than now.

Link to post
Share on other sites
(Spork)

is still a problem with the gts 360M card ?

ever time i tried to load up ubuntu from 9 on i would get some nasty white rectangles on the boot screen and them nothing :/

Link to post
Share on other sites
Growled

I'm trying SolusOS and it's what Ubuntu wants to be.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Andre S.

Ubuntu used to pioneer usability in the Linux world, IMO it's gone another direction now, I'm not sure what they're really trying to achieve. I've been trying out Linux Mint which seems to have adopted the original Ubuntu philosophy of providing a feature-rich and easy to use distribution, and while the current version (12) feels somewhat incoherent, I do have high hopes for the next version and its new interface, Cinnamon. I've replaced all my Ubuntu VMs with Linux Mint, the transition was very smooth.

Link to post
Share on other sites
(Spork)

been on 12.04 for about 4 days ... and i like it im a no0b to linux or sure but with googles help i have learned a lot so far still basic stuff but im happy

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
.Neo

So far I find Ubuntu to be pretty user-friendly. In previous versions I had to fiddle around in Terminal to get my resolution to stick properly in VMware Fusion, but that has been fixed.

The only issue I ran into when trying to natively boot my iMac into Ubuntu is that for whatever it won't connect my Apple wireless keyboard. The Magic Trackpad works just fine though so it doesn't seem to be a bluetooth driver issue. :/ I've been using it with my old USB Apple Keyboard, but obviously I'd rather use my new one.

Link to post
Share on other sites
scape

12.04 is the first time I finally had the guts to switch entirely away from Windows, and I haven't looked back yet!

Link to post
Share on other sites
ShMaunder

I think I should update my feelings a little towards this release. I've upgraded to 12.04 from 11.10 about 6 days ago and had only previously used 12.04 inside a VM.

I was impressed that all my gnome and Unity settings came across from 11.10 successfully. I am also impressed that Compiz isn't taking over my system as much as 11.10 did in terms of memory and CPU usage. There are a lot of new updated packages available in both the server and desktop edition - was pleasantly surprised by the better version of phpMyAdmin available on the servers which remembers user settings like number of rows to display in a table etc. There is also MySQL 5.5 available out of the box.

The application search in Unity seems more consistent. When I type in 'cal' in 11.10 it gave me calculator, but when I searched for 'calc' it would give me LibreOffice Calc. Whereas in 12.04, a search for 'cal' and 'calc' gives me LibreOffice Calc in both instances. Though I would prefer calculator to be the first option - there should be a automated 'ratings' system in place to determine your most used applications IMHO.

I updated 3 servers from 10.10 to 12.04 around the same period. The 'do-release-upgrade' command took care of everything and there wasn't any major problems. I did accidentally write over a few config files on one of the servers which meant it lost AD/LDAP integration - re-configuring Samba, keytabs and the sudoers file fixed it.

Some of the bad points, which relate to the desktop edition:

> Maximising windows on multiple monitors with different resolutions has got to be the most stupidest and freaking annoying bug I have ever seen in Ubuntu. There are tons of threads relating to this since 12.04's release. Basically, if you have a window larger than the smallest resolution of say two monitors (either by X, Y or both X&Y), then it will ONLY maximise on the larger screen even if you're displaying it on the smaller resolution screen (i.e. the window will jump to the larger screen) - this occurs using both the maximise button and the snap feature.

> The HUD is useless at the moment - why was this introduced in an LTS. It conflicts with other programs that use the ALT button etc.

> LibreOffice, oh LibreOffice, where is your global menu (lo-menubar)! I've heard this will be fixed in 12.10 and may actually make the HUD useful.

> Though Compiz is better in this version, it is still a POS. I've also heard that it could be removed in 12.10 - though it'll be like developing Unity all over again if they do (remember the development problems between 11.04 => 11.10 when they went from GTK2 to GTK3, it'll be like that but worse).

> Not Ubuntu's fault, but VMWare Workstation is pretty broken and requires Community patches to compile kernel modules.

Rating: 7/10. Apologies for the long post - someone may find it "interesting" to read :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Ently

This was the first time I have really used a Linux distro and I think it's really great.

What pushed me to try Linux in the first place ironically enough was Windows. I downloaded the Windows 8 Consumer Preview to try and after using that I was incredibly disappointed and frustrated with the direction that Windows was going so I started looking at alternatives for my day to day usage and found Ubuntu (I still use Windows to game but 99% of the time i'm in Linux).

I don't know how the other Linux builds stand up against this but my experience with this OS is definitely 10/10

It's fast, reliable and looks great I love it!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
javagreen

All good except Compiz doesn't work in the Gnome shell with the currently available nVidia drivers and I can't seem to find Emerald anywhere :/

Link to post
Share on other sites
sanctified

I agree that it's odd that Canonical decided to release some test technologies in a LTS release.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Scorbing

It's not the worst, but its not the best. I think Linux Mint is way better.

Link to post
Share on other sites
giannisgx89

Well until i see some nice UI in linux i will never use it.

Even with themes it's pretty bad.

I really hope there will be a working version of photoshop for ubuntu!

Link to post
Share on other sites
pers3us

Well until i see some nice UI in linux i will never use it.

Even with themes it's pretty bad.

I really hope there will be a working version of photoshop for ubuntu!

Define nice UI for me please!

And working version of photoshop is not gonna happen! Give Gimp a try though!

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By zikalify
      Canonical announces full enterprise support for Kubernetes 1.21
      by Paul Hill



      Canonical, the firm behind the Ubuntu operating system, has announced full enterprise support for Kubernetes 1.21. It said that support ranges from public cloud to edge and covers Charmed Kubernetes, MicroK8s, and kubeadm. According to Canonical, MicroK8s is suited for workstations, DevOps, edge and IoT, Charmed Kubernetes is aimed at multi-cloud clusters, and kubeadm is designed for manual operations.

      Notable changes in Kubernetes 1.21 include a memory manager which will improve the performance of some applications, new scheduler features, improvements to ReplicateSet downscaling, support for indexed jobs, and the deprecation of Pod Security Policy before its complete removal in Kubernetes 1.25.

      Commenting on the launch of Kubernetes 1.21, Canonical Product Manager Alex Chalkias said:

      Enterprise support for Kubernetes on Ubuntu is provided by Canonical as a part of the Ubuntu Advantage for Infrastructure (UA-I) support subscription. The package includes long-term security maintenance, kernel Livepatching, and mission-critical infrastructure support for the full stack from the kernel to the container across public clouds, Vmware, OpenStack, and bare metal.

      In terms of product releases from Canonical, this month is turning out to be a bit busy. On the first day of the month, Canonical launched Ubuntu 21.04 beta and is intending to release the finished product on April 22.

    • By zikalify
      Canonical releases Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo beta
      by Paul Hill

      Canonical has announced the availability of Ubuntu 21.04 Hirsute Hippo beta for Desktop, Server, and Cloud. There are also downloadable beta images of alternative Ubuntu flavours including Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu MATE, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu.

      The main Ubuntu 21.04 for Desktop is quite a good release this time around; it includes the newer 5.11 Linux kernel so more hardware will be supported and Canonical has switched to Wayland sessions by default away from X.org. Unlike Fedora 34, Canonical has decided to stick with GNOME 3.38 so that it can adapt its desktop extensions to work properly with GNOME 40.

      In its announcement, Canonical said:

      If you’d like to take Ubuntu 21.04 beta for a spin before the final release drops on April 22, head over to the mailing list announcement where you can find the links to all of the available Ubuntu 21.04 beta editions and flavours. Keep in mind that this software is still in development and you could run into bugs. If you do, you can report them to Canonical so they can be fixed before the final release later this month.

    • By zikalify
      Canonical releases second point release of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS
      by Paul Hill



      Canonical has announced the availability of Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS – the second point release for Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. As with other point releases, Canonical has spun a new ISO that includes all the security and software updates and it comes with the latest hardware enablement stacks so that newer hardware works properly.

      Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS is available for the Desktop, Server, and Cloud products as well as other flavours of Ubuntu such as Kubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu MATE, Lubuntu, Ubuntu Kylin, Ubuntu Studio, and Xubuntu. If you want to download any of the Ubuntu products or the spins, head over to the Ubuntu downloads page and find what you want.

      According to the Ubuntu 20.04 release notes page, Ubuntu 20.04.2 LTS ships with the Linux 5.8 kernel instead of Linux 5.4 which was the original kernel shipped last April when Focal Fossa came out. Those installing Ubuntu Server will have to opt-in to using the new kernel through the installer bootloader as it’s not the default choice.

      As with all Ubuntu LTS releases, you should expect security and software updates for five years until the first half of 2025. The derivative flavours are an exception, however, receiving support for just three years.

    • By zikalify
      Canonical launches Ubuntu Core 20 for IoT devices
      by Paul Hill



      Canonical has announced the general availability of Ubuntu Core 20, a stripped back version of Ubuntu 20.04 LTS designed for IoT devices and embedded systems. According to the company, this update improves device security with the inclusion of secure boot, full disk encryption and secure device recovery.

      Ubuntu Core is available for many popular x86 and ARM single board computers making it pretty accessible. IoT devices are not always easy to update so Canonical has configured Ubuntu Core to provide automated and reliable updates out of the box so end users don’t need to worry about updating their devices. While an LTS is usually supported for five years, it provides business-critical devices with 10 years of support.

      Commenting on today’s launch CEO Mark Shuttleworth said:

      Probably the most familiar device that can run Ubuntu Core, is the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. If you have a Raspberry Pi Compute Module or other compatible device lying around you can get it to work with Ubuntu Core 20 by heading over to the IoT section of the Ubuntu website and scrolling down to Ubuntu Core.

    • By zikalify
      Ubuntu 21.04 will use Wayland display server by default
      by Paul Hill



      Canonical’s Sebastien Bacher has announced that Ubuntu 21.04 will ship with the Wayland display server as the default, replacing X.Org. Bacher confirmed that NVIDIA users will still default to X.Org due to some on-going issues but the company hopes that these will be fully resolved by the time of the next Ubuntu LTS release in April 2022.

      If any of this sounds familiar, it’s because Canonical actually set Wayland as the default in Ubuntu 17.10 almost four years ago but found that the software was not ready to be released in the then-upcoming Ubuntu 18.04 LTS which would be used on production machines. Since then, other distributions have adopted Wayland and bugs have been worked out enough so that Canonical is ready to give it another shot.

      Explaining the situation, Bacher said:

      By shipping Wayland with Ubuntu 21.04, the company has a whole year and another Ubuntu release in October to find any major issues and get them fixed. This additional time, compared to when it was attempted before, should be long enough to ensure a stable Wayland release with Ubuntu 22.04 LTS.

      Via: Phoronix