****'s about to get real. Apple patents game controller


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Dysphoria

You got to love apple haters....

Read the freaking patent is for system and method for simplified communication between electronic devices, including a game controller, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, etc...

Apparently when you are bored, the best thing to do is copy paste few pictures blow shlT out of proportion and start a rumor.

Trolls will come like flies on shlT.

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Dysphoria

Well, there is this:

http://en.wikipedia....e_Bandai_Pippin

What next? Someone patents air and sues everyone who breathes...I called it first!!!

No ... whats next is that people need to start reading, and not quoting Head Titles from rumors.

Does anyone read anymore...

I read a study few years back, that attention span of the internet-age generation is as much as the attention span of a one year old toddler....

This topic just proves the point.

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McKay

Great, they copy the controller that I get cramp trying to use, I have fairly large hands and currently only feel comfortable using an Xbox Controller, heck I used to love the old style controller on the 1st Xbox before they slimmed it down with the "S" variation.

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Dysphoria

Great, they copy the controller that I get cramp trying to use, I have fairly large hands and currently only feel comfortable using an Xbox Controller, heck I used to love the old style controller on the 1st Xbox before they slimmed it down with the "S" variation.

No one is copying anything....

I know is much easier looking at pretty pictures, but try reading once in a while... It might change the way you see the world.

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Glassed Silver

God have mercy, this thread is so full of fail!

Glassed Silver:ios

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Kalint

No touchscreen!! So analog gross!

And I'm not reading the context, fail on!

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Noir Angel

So rather than trying to patent a game controller, Apple are instead trying to patent the idea of remotely controlling devices via NFC? I guess it's lucky for most users that wifi also works pretty well for that purpose.

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Xerxes

Kettle calling the pot black isn't it? Apple is romping around suing everyone for "stealing their ideas" and how it's stifling innovation blah blah...then they go blatantly rip off Sony's DS3? I hope Sony sue and give Apple a taste of their own medicine...

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Kalint

So I just read the context. Lol everyone... So this is what watching Fox News is like.

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Stetson

Kettle calling the pot black isn't it? Apple is romping around suing everyone for "stealing their ideas" and how it's stifling innovation blah blah...then they go blatantly rip off Sony's DS3? I hope Sony sue and give Apple a taste of their own medicine...

Apple is not patenting a game controller that looks like the dualshock.

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McKay

No one is copying anything....

I know is much easier looking at pretty pictures, but try reading once in a while... It might change the way you see the world.

You mean the article that states they're patenting a dual-shock style controller? Yes I read it, it looks identical to the Playstation controller, perhaps when you've gotten off your High Horse we can discuss like adults.

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migo

They probably noticed Sony hadn't patented their design yet and figured they might try to sue them for the PS4.

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Draconian Guppy

IIRC I read somewhere that when someone patents something that has been in use for previous years without patent, that product supersedes the patent?

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Ci7

They probably noticed Sony hadn't patented their design yet and figured they might try to sue them for the PS4.

or perhaps gonna sue the for all the millions PS3 that got sold demanding cut of the pie

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Dot Matrix

Too many buttons. Apple folk won't take after it. :p

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123456789A

No thanks Apple.

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Dysphoria

You mean the article that states they're patenting a dual-shock style controller? Yes I read it, it looks identical to the Playstation controller, perhaps when you've gotten off your High Horse we can discuss like adults.

No not the troll post (article) but the actual patent. If you read it you will see that it has nothing to do with patenting a game controller.

It is usefull to read the actual facts before making a conclusion from a troll post.

Cheers!

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Ryoken

Can we just Ban everyone here who posted without reading ? I figure it's for the best.. time to weed out the weak..

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Glassed Silver

Can we just Ban everyone here who posted without reading ? I figure it's for the best.. time to weed out the weak..

I don't think banning is the answer, but trolling needs to be handled differently, apart from light poking.

There are a bunch of reasons bother less about forums, I think this is one of the strongest: trolls duking it out against the "other camps".

Glassed Silver:ios

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soniqstylz

You got to love apple haters....

Read the freaking patent is for system and method for simplified communication between electronic devices, including a game controller, iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, etc...

Apparently when you are bored, the best thing to do is copy paste few pictures blow shlT out of proportion and start a rumor.

Trolls will come like flies on shlT.

Actually, that's exactly the point.

Mobile consoles like the Vita and 3DS have been limited in market share by iPhones/iPads/iPod Touch. But those devices are limited themselves by touch controls which don't work well for more complex gaming.

But if there was a controller, now you start to see possible AAA games coming to Apple devices without Apple having to create a full-fledged console (especially Apple TV).

It's an end-around for Apple to get deeper into the gaming industry without having to use massive amounts of R&D on an IBM/AMD/nVidia-powered $399 console.

I didn't post for the Dualshock-like design, it even says at the end of the article that the final design would most likely be different.

If the controller does become a reality, it'll likely have a few design tweaks to stop it looking identical to the DualShock, but any type of physical controller from the industry behemoth would send ripples through the gaming world.

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xendrome

Ok since no one here can read, APPLE isn't creating a controller. I will quote Javik cause I don't feel like looking for my own post:

So rather than trying to patent a game controller, Apple are instead trying to patent the idea of remotely controlling devices via NFC?
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