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Why intel does not recommending defragging HDD SSD? and suggest optimizer o

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NoUserName    3

obMLal.jpg

Why?

What is the differences in betweens for regulay defrage (default windows built-in one / or any 3rd party like defraggler) and the suggested optimizer tool by intel?

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Vice    1,594

You don't need to defragment an SSD. They don't get fragmented in the same way that Hard Drives do. Hard Drives access data using a physical arm which must move across the surface of the disk as it spins thus having files together in one place on the disk is helpful for reading the information faster. But with SSD's everything is spread out across many chips (6-12 or more usually) and because each one can be accessed instantly with no impact on wait times through file fragmentation there is no need to defragment. And in-fact defragging will reduce the life of your SSD by creating more writes on the chips inside.

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Harrison H.    70

The purpose to defragging a hard drive is to move data closer together so that there is less ware and tear on the discs (less spinning/seeking). On an SSD, this doesn't exist since there are no moving parts. However, SSDs do have a limited amount of read/writes before they die. By defragging, you aren't gaining any benefit, but are reducing your SSD's life.

Vice beat me to it ^

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Circaflex    3,010

Intel SSD Optimizer use the Windows* 7 ATA Data Set Management Command (known as Trim) to help keep the Intel SSD running at continued high performance.

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=what%20is%20intel%20ssd%20optimizer&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CB8QFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdownload.intel.com%2Fdesign%2Fflash%2Fnand%2Fmainstream%2FIntel_SSD_Optimizer_White_Paper.pdf&ei=q_FIUMiJJcHCigLDuIHQDw&usg=AFQjCNEbIx-vSHBJx8ach_ENTpTI6lK-qw

You should never defrag an SSD. Don't even think about it. The reason is that physical data placement on an SSD is handled solely by the SSD's firmware, and what it reports to Windows is NOT how the data is actually stored on the SSD.

This means that the physical data placement a defragger shows in it's fancy sector chart has nothing to do with reality. The data is NOT where Windows thinks it is, and Windows has no control over where the data is actually placed.

To even out usage on its internal memory chips SSD firmware intentionally splits data up across all of the SSD's memory chips, and it also moves data around on these chips when it isn't busy reading or writing (in an attempt to even out chip usage.)

Windows never sees any of this, so if you do a defrag Windows will simply cause a whole bunch of needless I/O to the SSD and this will do nothing except decrease the useful life of the SSD.

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NoUserName    3

So I should do the optimization weekly as it is recommended here:

wl96Rl.jpg

Or also once a week is not good?

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Harrison H.    70

That's perfectly fine since it's running it's trim functionality which is not what defragging is.

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NoUserName    3

Ok, Thanks :)

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+devHead    1,741

I've noticed though, that Windows 8 RTM does include SSDs in the list of drives to be defragmented, while Windows 7 left it unchecked in the list of drives scheduled for defragmentation. If you click 'Defragment' for an SSD, it very quickly does some TRIM thing and it's done within a second.

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NoUserName    3

I've noticed though, that Windows 8 RTM does include SSDs in the list of drives to be defragmented, while Windows 7 left it unchecked in the list of drives scheduled for defragmentation. If you click 'Defragment' for an SSD, it very quickly does some TRIM thing and it's done within a second.

You mean the same as the Intel optimizer mentioned above and not a normal defrage?

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+devHead    1,741

You mean the same as the Intel optimizer mentioned above and not a normal defrage?

That's what it seems like; certainly not fast enough to be called defragmenting like a HDD. SSD speed advantages notwithstanding.

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