Ouya scores 9 out of 10 in repairability


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compl3x

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Ouya, the little open-source game console that could, has received very high marks for repairability by iFixit.

iFixit tears down consoles, phone, tablets and other devices to see what hardware is used and grades the devices on how easy they are to repair if something were to go wrong.

The console, which costs just $99 for consumers, is three inches across by three inches high and deep. Under the hood is 1GB SDRAM, a Nvidia Tegra 3 CPU, a Texas Instruments power management tool and comically, five metal weights used to make the console more bottom heavy and not topple over and to keep the cables connected in the back more stable.

Scoring a 9 places the Ouya in rare company, as many current generation devices are almost impossible to repair on your own if something were to happen. For example, the new MicrosoftSurface Pro tablet scored a 1/10, with the company calling it impossible to repair.

Additionally, iFixit tore apart the controllers (which cost $50 after the first one) and found they are powered by an ARM Cortex M3 processor. The company says the joysticks are soldered to the circuit board, however, meaning if the joysticks are damaged you will likely have to completely replace the controller.

More pictures here: Ouya Teardown

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paul0544

I was going to pre-order one a while back from Amazon. I am glad I waited as there is now a delay. I will wait until the problem is solved and then pick one up :)

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HawkMan

On the list of pros/cons for picking a console, at the very bottom of the list, in fact at the very bottom of the last marked" things I don't care about and doesn't affect me" you will find, Repairability.

it's a console not my computer tower.

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Astra.Xtreme

"Repairability" doesn't make much sense in this context.

Sure maybe it's easy to take apart, but that doesn't mean it can be repaired if something breaks or burns out.

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DirtyLarry

Actually got mine today...

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I did not realize getting other apk files on it like XBMC was going to be such a process. Had no idea there was this whole aspect of "side loading" required. Really thought they would have simplified the whole process some. So going to be a little while before I start checking that side of things out.

Otherwise, I actually had to YouTube what the hell I was supposed to do with just getting the batteries in the controller. And my controller buttons started sticking immediately. Perusing the "app store" is a painfully slow process. Downloading same deal. But there is something I like about it. So do not expect a whole lot of it, but my first impression is it is not as useless as I feared it may be.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Anthony Tosie

I just got mine in the mail today, and I have to say it's a very mixed bag.

The hardware is fantastic, IMO. The console itself is very unique, and I don't have any of the problems with the controller I've read elsewhere -- buttons have great feedback, it's easy to open, all that. Where the Ouya really suffers is the software -- it just feels so incomplete. The idea behind it is fine, but it's a mess beyond that. There's odd instances of Android in the settings, it's slow, the game tiles routinely don't show up, etc.

Luckily all that can be fixed, but I still think the idea behind the console is fantastic. I hope more companies make small ARM-powered devices like this as ARM advances.

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compl3x

^^ Any decent SNES/NES/GBA etc. emulators for it ?

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n_K

"Repairability" doesn't make much sense in this context.

Sure maybe it's easy to take apart, but that doesn't mean it can be repaired if something breaks or burns out.

Agreed. They had a go at apple for soldering a whole macbook together but say this is fine? If the main chip goes or a passive component, you've got to get a whole new board for it, and I doubt they'll be selling spare boards so you'll have to get a whole new unit. This thing isn't repairable at all really unless the controllers tacky and has a stuck button.

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Anthony Tosie

^^ Any decent SNES/NES/GBA etc. emulators for it ?

I haven't had a ton of time to explore the games catalog, since it's kind of a mess. I didn't see any on first glance, but I'd be amazed if there weren't some eventually.

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