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Internet, Network, and Security How-To's and FAQs


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Barney T.

This topic is for the placement of links to how-to articles, tips, FAQs, or helpful information related to internet, network, and security. Please post links to the actual articles.

 

Internet Basics

 

 

 

Networking Basics

 

 

 

Security Basics

 

 

       Security Tools

 

         Security Tools for basic users:

 

 

 

FAQ's

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+BudMan

While this in theory might be a good idea - in practice your 2 links so far are not very informative or worthy of links too.

 

How is a thread with a link to a speed test site, where everyone posts theirs -- its a how many stairs/windows thread.  Sure an the hell is not "internet basics". Or even good at explaining what a speed test is for that matter.

 

As to that good network configuration thread -- what?  That is a guy asking such a loaded question, and then getting hammered for more information..

 

A better link for speedtest would be just the wiki article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speedtest.net

 

As to network -- this would be a better first link than that nonsense thread http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_network

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Barney T.

^ Done. Thanks, Budman. Please feel free to suggest as needed. You have lots of helpful posts and info, so I am hoping that you will give us the good stuff. :) Also, I will add links as the members recommend them. Thanks so much.

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+BudMan

Your welcome I guess - but really not sure speed testing should go there, but since "internet basics" is such a broad topic I guess you could fit most anything in there ;)

 

You will want to redo your link title for the network configuration - that is not a good anything, its just a link to information of what makes up a network.

 

I will try and come up with some links for your topics.  Under Security, which I would not really call basics.. I would prob remove the basics from all the topics except for internet and network and security would be just that.. And FAQ kind of redundant since most all of these are FAQ ;)

 

Under security for a start

http://www.us-cert.gov/

http://osvdb.org/

http://www.sans.org/

http://nvd.nist.gov/

http://cve.mitre.org/

 

You might want some sub topics under Security and Networking and even Internet, etc.

 

Under security sub sections you might have links to tools - some starters

http://nmap.org/

http://www.tenable.com/products/nessus

http://ettercap.github.io/ettercap/

http://www.wireshark.org/

 

Basic users and window users might want to take a look at for tools

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-US/security/cc184924.aspx

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=39273

 

This could end up being really a lot of links, sine the topic is wide open ;)  And we could have whole sections on 1 specific protocol such as dns ;)

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Eric

This can always be spun off into separate FAQ threads with this one as an index if needed.

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Barney T.

^ Added. Thanks all! This is just a start, so please just suggest whatever subtopics I should post above (Y).

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goretsky

Hello,

 

Some anti-malware companies' blogs:

 

AVG - http://blogs.avg.com/

Avast! - http://blog.avast.com/

Avira - http://techblog.avira.com/en

BitDefender - http://www.bitdefender.com/blog/

CommTouch - https://blog.commtouch.com/cafe/ (formerly F-PROT)

Comodo - http://blogs.comodo.com/

ESET - http://www.welivesecurity.com/

F-Secure - http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/

G Data - http://blog.gdatasoftware.com/blog.html

Kaspersky Lab - http://blog.kaspersky.com/

Malwarebytes - http://blog.malwarebytes.org/

McAfee - http://blogs.mcafee.com/

Panda Security - http://pandalabs.pandasecurity.com/

Sophos - http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/

Symantec - http://www.symantec.com/connect/security/blogs

Trend Micro - http://blog.trendmicro.com/

Webroot - http://www.webroot.com/blog/

 

There are, of course, dozens of anti-malware companies, so this is just a very incomplete list to help get the ball rolling.

 

Regards,

 

Aryeh Goretsky

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nabz0r

Hello,

 

Some monitoring, log, etc stuff:

 

MRTG (Free, I am going to try it and let you guys know)

PRTG (This one has both free and paid version, never tried it before but I've heard a lot of good things about it)

Splunk

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nabz0r

Here is another great guide for those which are interested in backing up their network devices automatically with Rancid.

How to install Rancid on a Linux machine

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sc302

Hello,

 

Some monitoring, log, etc stuff:

 

MRTG (Free, I am going to try it and let you guys know)

PRTG (This one has both free and paid version, never tried it before but I've heard a lot of good things about it)

Splunk

Lets not forget cacti

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nabz0r

Lets not forget cacti

Yeah, another great tool. I started using at home on Ubuntu server and I am loving it so far.

 

Here is how to install it on

RHEL/CentOS

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nabz0r

Hi,

 

Here is one of the best monitoring opensource system that I have came across. I installed at home and I am in love with it. Just configure SNMP and you're good to go. It pulls everything.

 

Observium

 

I am going to mention this as well, probably most of you will use it, it's IPAM IP managemnet free.. I have been using it for almost 2 years and it's absolutely great.

 

PHPIPam

 

Enjoy my finds. :P

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nabz0r

Good Thread, I have found some useful guides on here....

 

http://www.firewall.cx/

+1. That website is one plus for Cisco stuff.

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hollowhan
On 12/10/2013 at 8:11 PM, nabz0r said:

Here is another great guide for those which are interested in backing up their network devices automatically with Rancid.

How to install Rancid on a Linux machine

Thx a lot Nab! Great info.

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Jason S.

Please dont resurrect old threads. Thank you.

 

Sorry folks! didnt realize this was a pinned thread. i reopened it.

Edited by Jason S.
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