HT: Get better battery life on your linux laptop


Recommended Posts

simonlang

There are a few tweaks and tips available to get better battery life out of your linux notebook.

to measure, i have installed powerstat, which is a simple tool to calculate your power consumption.

 

you can get it via:

sudo apt-get install powerstat

give it a go and check the numbers:

here is what my result looked like:

 

pwr1.jpg

 

average is about ca. 12,5

 

to improve power consumption it is suggested to install TLP

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:linrunner/tlp
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install tlp tlp-rdw

then enter in the Konsole:

sudo tlp start

tlp is now running.

 

running another powerstat test, the average power consumption should be reduced.

 

my results:

pwr2.jpg

 

average is about 11,6

 

 

switching from free radeon driver to fglrx (or to the appropriate nvidia driver which might be in your case). do this in the hardware settings of your system-control panel.

 

running another powerstat test i now got the following:

 

pwr3.jpg

 

average is 8,x

 

 

i have yet to try and see how much longer my notebook now runs on battery but apparently these few tweaks gain you between 10 and 15% of battery.

 

done with snapshot-linux 0.4 which is basically kubuntu 14.04. these tweaks should work with any *buntu based distro.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Aergan

tlp makes worlds of difference with older hardware (e.g. my Core 2 Duo HP Laptop).

 

If you're stuggling to save more battery life / be more environmentally conscious, then look at lowering your IGPU clockspeeds when you don't need it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Abhay V
      Microsoft finally brings its Chromium-based Edge in preview form to Linux
      by Abhay Venkatesh



      Microsoft today announced that Edge is finally available for download on Linux. The Dev channel version of the Chromium-based browser makes it to the platform almost a year after the official announcement and as promised last month.

      The Redmond giant says that the release supports Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, and openSUSE distributions. The browser will be updated weekly, just like the Dev channel builds on other platforms. The company has also posted instructions for the process of installing the packages on various distributions using their standard package management tools, for those interested. However, the easier way is to download and install the .deb or .rpm packages from the Insider website here.

      As for features, the company is “aiming to provide a representative experience for developers who want to build and test their sites and apps on Linux”. The preview release for Linux currently does not feature many user-facing features such as support for signing into Microsoft accounts – which means that there will be no sync capabilities. However, the company does promise to release these features with a future update.

      Considering that the release is still in early development, the firm cautions that there will be many “bugs and unexpected behaviors“ and urges developers to send feedback through the browser. Lastly, the company is also accepting submissions for the Microsoft Edge Bounty Program on Linux for security researchers.

      With the addition of support for Linux, the Redmond firms offering is now present on all platforms that support Chromium.

    • By News Staff
      Get the Complete Computer Networking eBook & Video Course Bundle for only $29.99
      by Steven Parker

      Today's highlighted deal comes via our Online Courses section of the Neowin Deals store where you can save 95% off this Complete Computer Networking eBook & Video Course Bundle. Attain systems efficiency & security with 14+ hours of video content and 5 comprehensive e books on DevOps, Programming, AWS, CCNA, and more.



      This bundle consists of the following courses:

      The Ultimate Kubernetes Bootcamp by School of Devops [Video]
      Prepare for the CKA Exam — Master Container Orchestration with Kubernetes One Step at a Time AWS Certified Advanced Networking: Specialty Exam Guide [eBook]
      Build Your Knowledge & Technical Expertise as an AWS-Certified Networking Specialist Hands-On Network Programming with C [eBook]
      Learn Socket Programming in C & Write Secure and Optimized Network Codes Analyzing Network Traffic with Wireshark 2.6 [Video]
      Delve Into Network Traffic & Analyze Individual Protocol Data Units Active Directory Administration Cookbook [eBook]
      Actionable, Proven Solutions to Identity Management & Authentication on Servers and in the Cloud Hands-On PowerShell for Active Directory [Video]
      Use PowerShell for Active Directory to Eliminate Manual Labor with Quick Automation Tasks & Functions Effective Jenkins: Getting Started with Continuous Integration [Video]
      Learn Continuous Integration, Automate Your Jenkins Projects & Get Continuous Feedback for Your Upstream/Downstream Projects Hands-On Kubernetes Networking [Video]
      Unravel the Mystery of Networking in Your Kubernetes Cluster in a Pragmatic Manner CCNA Cyber Ops SECOPS: Certification Guide 210-255 [eBook]
      Develop Your Cybersecurity Knowledge to Obtain CyberOps Certification Hands-On Linux for Architects [eBook]
      Design & Implement Linux-Based IT Solutions Good to know
      Updates included Length of time users can access after purchase: lifetime Redemption deadline: redeem your code within 30 days of purchase For a full description, specs, and author info please click here.

      Here's the deal:
      This Complete Computer Networking eBook & Video Course Bundle normally costs* $746 but it can be yours for just $29.99 for a limited time, that's a saving of $716.01 (95%) off the price.

      >> Get this deal, or learn more about it here <<
      See all Online Courses on offer. This is a time limited deal.
      Get $1 credit for every $25 spent · Give $10, Get $10 · 10% off for first-time buyers.

      Not for you?
      If this offer doesn't interest you, why not check out the following offers:

      The Win Your Dream 2020 Tesla Model 3 Giveaway
      The Nintendo Gaming Bundle Giveaway 20% off Ivacy VPN subscription with coupon code IVACY20 NordVPN subscription at up to 68% off for a 2 year plan Private Internet Access VPN subscription at up to 71% off Unlocator VPN or SmartDNS unblock Geoblock with 7-day free trial Disable Sponsored posts · Other recent deals · Preferred partner software

      Disclosure: This is a StackCommerce deal or giveaway in partnership with Neowin; an account at StackCommerce is required to participate in any deals or giveaways. For a full description of StackCommerce's privacy guidelines, go here. Neowin benefits from shared revenue of each sale made through our branded deals site, and it all goes toward the running costs.

    • By News Staff
      Linux Administration Cookbook (normally $35.99) - free offer ends today
      by Steven Parker

      Claim your complimentary copy (worth $35.99) for free, before the offer expires ends today Oct 6.



      What's it about?
      Insightful recipes to work with system administration tasks on Linux.

      Linux is one of the most widely used operating systems among system administrators, and even modern application and server development is heavily reliant on the Linux platform.



      The Linux Administration Cookbook is your go-to guide to get started on your Linux journey. It will help you understand what that strange little server is doing in the corner of your office, what the mysterious virtual machine languishing in Azure is crunching through, what that circuit-board-like thing is doing under your office TV, and why the LEDs on it are blinking rapidly.

      This book will get you started with administering Linux, giving you the knowledge and tools you need to troubleshoot day-to-day problems, ranging from a Raspberry Pi to a server in Azure, while giving you a good understanding of the fundamentals of how GNU/Linux works.

      Through the course of the book, you’ll install and configure a system, while the author regales you with errors and anecdotes from his vast experience as a data center hardware engineer, systems administrator, and DevOps consultant.

      By the end of the book, you will have gained practical knowledge of Linux, which will serve as a bedrock for learning Linux administration and aid you in your Linux journey.

      This free offer expires on October 6.

      How to get it
      Please ensure you read the terms and conditions to claim this offer. Complete and verifiable information is required in order to receive this free offer. If you have previously made use of these free offers, you will not need to re-register. While supplies last!

      >> Linux Administration Cookbook ($35.99 Value) - free download <<
      Offered by Packt Publishing, view their other free resources. Expires 10/06/20.

      Not for you?
      That's OK, there are other free eBooks on offer you can check out here, but be aware that these are all time-limited offers. If you are uncomfortable sharing your details with a third-party sponsor, we understand. Or via our preferred partner:

      How can I disable these posts? Click here.

      Disclosure: A valid email address is required to fulfill your request. Complete and verifiable information is required in order to receive this offer. By submitting a request, your information is subject to TradePub.com's Privacy Policy.

    • By News Staff
      Free download: Linux Administration Cookbook (normally costs $35.99)
      by Steven Parker

      Claim your complimentary copy (worth $35.99) for free, before the offer expires next Tuesday on October 6.



      What's it about?
      Insightful recipes to work with system administration tasks on Linux.

      Linux is one of the most widely used operating systems among system administrators, and even modern application and server development is heavily reliant on the Linux platform.



      The Linux Administration Cookbook is your go-to guide to get started on your Linux journey. It will help you understand what that strange little server is doing in the corner of your office, what the mysterious virtual machine languishing in Azure is crunching through, what that circuit-board-like thing is doing under your office TV, and why the LEDs on it are blinking rapidly.

      This book will get you started with administering Linux, giving you the knowledge and tools you need to troubleshoot day-to-day problems, ranging from a Raspberry Pi to a server in Azure, while giving you a good understanding of the fundamentals of how GNU/Linux works.

      Through the course of the book, you’ll install and configure a system, while the author regales you with errors and anecdotes from his vast experience as a data center hardware engineer, systems administrator, and DevOps consultant.

      By the end of the book, you will have gained practical knowledge of Linux, which will serve as a bedrock for learning Linux administration and aid you in your Linux journey.

      This free offer expires next Tuesday on October 6.

      How to get it
      Please ensure you read the terms and conditions to claim this offer. Complete and verifiable information is required in order to receive this free offer. If you have previously made use of these free offers, you will not need to re-register. While supplies last!

      >> Linux Administration Cookbook ($35.99 Value) - free download <<
      Offered by Packt Publishing, view their other free resources. Expires 10/06/20.

      Not for you?
      That's OK, there are other free eBooks on offer you can check out here, but be aware that these are all time-limited offers. If you are uncomfortable sharing your details with a third-party sponsor, we understand. Or via our preferred partner:

      How can I disable these posts? Click here.

      Disclosure: A valid email address is required to fulfill your request. Complete and verifiable information is required in order to receive this offer. By submitting a request, your information is subject to TradePub.com's Privacy Policy.

    • By Rich Woods
      Eric Raymond thinks Microsoft is ready to swap out the Windows kernel for Linux
      by Rich Woods



      According to a blog post penned by open-source advocate Eric Raymond, Microsoft is finally ready to give up on that old relic it called Windows, which doesn't even generate enough revenue anymore to be more than a "sideshow" at the company. Raymond says that now that Azure makes so much more money than Windows does, the firm is set to replace Windows with Linux, which will run an emulation layer in order to maintain compatibility with legacy apps.

      The only problem is that none of that is true. Despite stagnant growth, Windows revenue is still among the most profitable pieces of Microsoft. Azure is set to surpass that someday, but that day is not today. Nevertheless, Raymond thinks that the more that this happens, the less Windows will be as a priority for Microsoft, and eventually, Windows development simply won't make sense.

      The speculation that Microsoft cares less about Windows than it once did (it's not even really speculation) isn't new, and it stands to reason that the firm will care even less down the line. But Raymond not only looks at Microsoft's finances as evidence; he looks at clues that are right in front of us. Those clues are, you guessed it, the Windows Subsystem for Linux and Microsoft's Edge browser coming to Linux.

      The latter is actually pretty easily explained, since it took such little work to bring Edge to Linux. Edge is based on Chromium now, and so it supports all of the platforms supported by Chromium. What probably should have been more notable is that Microsoft built Edge from Chromium in the first place, rather than continuing to develop its own in-house browser. The story with how Edge was rebuilt is quite similar to what Raymond is saying will happen with Windows.

      Windows does ship with a Linux kernel now with the latest Windows Subsystem for Linux, and as noted in the blog post, Microsoft does contribute to Linux in an effort to make WSL better.

      All of this adds up to, in Raymond's opinion, Microsoft rebuilding Windows from a Linux kernel, with a Windows emulation layer on top. Developers will be able to compile their apps to run natively if they wish, which is what Microsoft is already doing with Edge.

      While he does create a compelling argument for Microsoft wanting to do this, he doesn't account for whether or not Microsoft can do this. The Redmond firm is notoriously bad at getting app developers on board for something that it wants them to do; you can use Windows Phone or Windows on ARM as examples here. It's also not shown that it's great at emulation, with 32-bit emulation not being great on ARM PCs and 64-bit emulation not even here yet.

      What do you think? Is the year of desktop Linux finally on the way? Let us know in the comments!