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marveloz

To target Windows 7 VM:

C:\Users\Marv>psexec \\10.1.1.20 
-u Marv -p oops cmd
PsExec v2.11 - Execute processes remotelyCopyright (C) 2001-2014 Mark 
RussinovichSysinternals - www.sysinternals.com
Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7601]Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft 
Corporation.  All rights reserved.
C:\Windows\system32>
C:\Users\Marv>psexec \\10.1.1.20 
-u Marv -p oops -i -s -d calc
PsExec v2.11 - Execute processes remotelyCopyright (C) 2001-2014 Mark 
RussinovichSysinternals - www.sysinternals.com
calc started on 10.1.1.20 with process ID 3296.
C:\Users\Marv>

Success, yay! :D

 

 

To target Windows XP VM:

C:\Users\Marv>psexec \\10.1.1.21 
-u Administrator -p oops cmd
PsExec v2.11 - Execute processes remotelyCopyright (C) 2001-2014 Mark 
RussinovichSysinternals - www.sysinternals.com
Couldn't access 10.1.1.21:Access is denied.
C:\Users\Marv>psexec \\10.1.1.21 
-u Administrator -p oops -s cmd
PsExec v2.11 - Execute processes remotelyCopyright (C) 2001-2014 Mark 
RussinovichSysinternals - www.sysinternals.com
Couldn't access 10.1.1.21:Access is denied.
C:\Users\Marv>
C:\Users\Marv>psexec \\10.1.1.21 
-u Administrator -p oops -i -s -d calc
PsExec v2.11 - Execute processes remotelyCopyright (C) 2001-2014 Mark 
RussinovichSysinternals - www.sysinternals.com
Couldn't access 10.1.1.21:Access is denied.
C:\Users\Marv>

Failed , nay! :(

 

PS: I've manually disabled any protections(firewall, etc) and enabled all sharing/remote access options I could find on each target but stil no luck.

 

 

Will someone point out where I'm wrong please? /:

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binaryzero

Do you have Powershell installed?

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Raa

Doesn't the remote registry service need to be enabled, or am I on the wrong track...

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marveloz

Windows 7 target:

 

remserv_zpsrasppkbv.jpg

lsp7_zpsjwb4bav6.jpg

 

 

Windows XP target:

 

remservxp_zpsokktxw8y.jpg

lsp_zpswpz6qkr5.jpg

 

 

Had to use photobucket to provide pictures, I haven't had PowerShell installed yet but I'll find out more about it.

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binaryzero

What do you think psexec is? All it's doing is using powerhsell on the target machine to execute a command. 

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marveloz

What do you think psexec is? All it's doing is using powerhsell on the target machine to execute a command. 

My bad, I stand corrected :)

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+BudMan

"All it's doing is using powerhsell on the target machine to execute a command."

 

Where did you get that? That is not the case at all

 

http://windowsitpro.com/systems-management/psexec

 

ps in psexec does not stand for powershell ;)  It gots its name from the ps command in unix.  Read the above article for some history and insight on the command.

 

powershell came out in what 2006, that article on psexec was written in 2004 well before powershell was even avaiable as an oddon.

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binaryzero

Well there you go. 

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