Was the Win 8 font rendering issue fixed on Windows 10?


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One is "Blurry Font" issue directly related to DPI on high resolution screens, regardless of the application/software that is running.
The other is the MS Office text problem, where text looks really faded and somewhat "thinner" compared to other menus. For example in outlook you can clearly see the difference in text of context menu vs context menu in other windows applications which uses native context menu (right click).

This is just a basic example, there is a lot more, including items and text within outlooks like email list for one.

Now the difference in your screen may not be as drastic but what I see below is a huge difference in readability:

MS Office:

e369c4d680433af27ee3017ff4de3806.png  vs  5a637b8d940f8489f61b42e548a728bb.png

Now imagine reading hundreds of emails with fonts faded like above instead of being truely black even though text and font is selected as Size 10 at Black.

Personally I much prefer the example on the left. I'm not a fan of the stark, high-contrast text on the right.

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That's not really true, while you still need AA on high density screens (Unless we're talking like 400ppi+), schemes like ClearType become kinda pointless (Greyscale uses whole pixels for AA, while ClearType only uses 1/3rd of a pixel or so, the pixels are so small on high resolution screens that it's hard to tell the different between 1/3rd of a pixel and a whole pixel)

Whether or not schemes like ClearType make sense on high-density screens, is neither here nor there, I wrote "high-resolution" screens. That's not the same thing. 

But that's just ClearType, the proverbial retard of the font-rendering family. Apple uses its proprietary font rendering engine on their near 400ppi devices. Maybe they wouldn't if all they had was ClearType. 

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ClearType is primarily anti-aliasing, Apple don't use it on iOS devices for the same reason Microsoft don't use it on Surface tablets, they do screen rotation.

There are 4 font rendering APIs on Windows, only one of them (GDI) basically requires ClearType to get a good result. The others are either indifferent because they implement AA properly (WPF/DirectWrite), or are so old that they predate it (The old NT4 era copy of Adobe Font Manager MS still ship to let GDI using apps deal with PostScript fonts).

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OK, so when using a custom DPI (on high res laptop screens) you can still see the difference, for example when you go to hardware manager or Computer Management, the title will be crisp but everything else will be blurry because for some reason it cannot manage the font of those items.

As for Outlook and Microsoft Office, the text in 8.1 is still not properly displayed, it's way too thin. You can see jagged edges with or without CT on font selection.

One more annoyance is, within same Microsoft application, some fonts are hard coded, while others are dpi adjusted, this makes it even worse, have you ever tried to adjust "View" types in outlook? Go and check you can never make read and unread emails same size (just one bold and other normal) it's really a mess. So I tend to believe this is a software issue not OS issue, however it is Software + OS issue when using software developed by MS.

 

I am hoping things are better in Office 2016..

 

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