Why do car tyres crack? Prevention possible?


 Share

Recommended Posts

I have only been driving for a few months.

 

I have a 15-year-old Suzuki Wagon R+.

 

Both tires on the left side are starting to crack, so I plan to get them replaced tomorrow.

 

Is there a reason they crack?

 

Is it possible to help prevent it for longer periods? (possible maintenance of them, etc.?)

eb_crackedtyre1.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have new tires that I bought couple months ago... tried to make sure you buy one of these tires shines products, it will keep your tires like new.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rubber is a week material. There's tons of reasons for cracks and it just comes down to the material degrading, more than likely temperature based.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Goode read, http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=30

 

Quote

Because all tires are made of rubber, all tires will eventually exhibit some type of cracking condition, usually late in their life. However, this cracking can be accelerated by too much exposure to heat, vehicle exhaust, ozone and sunlight, as well as electric generators and motors (that have armature brushes). For example, a vehicle parked outside instead of in a garage will constantly expose its tires to the rays of the sun, increasing the likelihood of cracking. Additionally, some sidewall cracking has been linked to abrasion from parking against a curb, or the excessive use of tire cleaners/dressings that inadvertently remove some of the tire's anti-oxidants and anti-ozone protection during every cleaning procedure. Interestingly enough, when sun exposure or excessive cleaning is the cause of the small cracks, the sidewall of the tire facing outward will show damage, while the sidewall facing inward is rarely affected.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Elliot B. said:

I have only been driving for a few months.

 

I have a 15-year-old Suzuki Wagon R+.

 

Both tires on the left side are starting to crack, so I plan to get them replaced tomorrow.

 

Is there a reason they crack?

 

Is it possible to help prevent it for longer periods? (possible maintenance of them, etc.?)

eb_crackedtyre1.jpg

This is what is known as dry rot. 

 

The oils and compound that hold the tire together are letting go.  I've seen worse and driven on worse.

 

You don't want it to happen, develop a tire that doesn't use rubber.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, xendrome said:

How old are the current tires?

I'm not sure, they came with the car.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, they're 'perishing' time to get some new ones bud. They look old and at some point, underinflated.

I don't actually recall if it is indeed law, but there was a rumour that tyres with cracks can cost the driver points and fines.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is an old military procedure to protect tyres from cracking. You will need an oil based shoe shine creme, the ones that smell like gasoline. Rub it into tyres once every 1-2 months. 

 

Open_black_Kiwi.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/15/2016 at 2:14 PM, Elliot B. said:

I have only been driving for a few months.

 

I have a 15-year-old Suzuki Wagon R+.

 

Both tires on the left side are starting to crack, so I plan to get them replaced tomorrow.

 

Is there a reason they crack?

 

Is it possible to help prevent it for longer periods? (possible maintenance of them, etc.?)

eb_crackedtyre1.jpg

natural rubber perishes in sunlight, as some have said keep the tyres dressed whenever possible with a silicone based spray, this will minimise the perishing of said rubber. Insaying that those bridgestones are old and at one point have been run underinflated, hence the rollover marks and faded bridgeston label.

On 7/16/2016 at 6:27 AM, Yogurth said:

There is an old military procedure to protect tyres from cracking. You will need an oil based shoe shine creme, the ones that smell like gasoline. Rub it into tyres once every 1-2 months. 

 

Open_black_Kiwi.JPG

is the turpentine in shoe polish that does its magic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, Mando said:

natural rubber perishes in sunlight, as some have said keep the tyres dressed whenever possible with a silicone based spray, this will minimise the perishing of said rubber. Insaying that those bridgestones are old and at one point have been run underinflated, hence the rollover marks and faded bridgeston label.

is the turpentine in shoe polish that does its magic.

I did not know that turpentine was the magic ingredient, I just know when I was in the army we had to rub the shoe polish on to tyres from time to time. Thx for the explanation!

 

If anyone is asking how, just use regular Shoe Bristle.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Yogurth said:

I did not know that turpentine was the magic ingredient, I just know when I was in the army we had to rub the shoe polish on to tyres from time to time. Thx for the explanation!

 

If anyone is asking how, just use regular Shoe Bristle.

no worries buddy, I only know because before I retrained in IT Support, I was a bespoke surgical shoemaker (leatherworker) seems a lifetime ago now :) any silicone lubricant also has the same effect to natural rubber. Kiwi also do a higher quality polish, called Parade Gloss, higher turpentine content.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/15/2016 at 4:14 PM, Elliot B. said:

I have a 15-year-old Suzuki Wagon R+.

If I saw that on my tyre, my first instinct would've been to perform a wheels alignment test and re-balance the tyre.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.