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Which Synology AC Router? (RT1900AC vs. RT2600AC)

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PGHammer    1,266

I am finding myself in the rather unwanted position of NEEDING - not wanting - to replace my existing router.  The problems  with the existing router are not related to either security OR wired support  -which is why I hate the idea of having to replace an otherwise-solid router; the issue is wireless support (specifically 5 GHz N range).  The two Synology routers in the finals are in the subject - which has the best wireless range?  The spread is $100USD or less on Amazon (new) - and will replace the Netgear WNDR3700v4 I use today.  Both routers have the same WIRED side support as the router it would replace - which is why the wired side is not the issue.

My current router supports 5 GHz N; however, it is spotty on the second floor - hence the problem.  Since moving the router won't fly, you either add access points/go mesh, or replace the router altogether  Going mesh is the same cost as replacing/upgrading the router - and going mesh threatens to add unwanted complexity

and frou-frou (yecccch).

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Xenon    4,812

I am a fan of the RT2600AC. Its over priced but it has been reliable for me. I have had no problems with range. With whatever router you get, just make sure you update the firmware when you get it.

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RottGutt    76

I agree with Xenon, my RT2600AC has been great since I got it about a year ago. I would go with the RT2600AC, since Synology has announced and will soon release a "mesh" router that will work with the RT2600AC, but not the RT1900AC. This would future-proof you if you ever move into a place that needs more coverage.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=synology+mesh+router&safe=off&rlz=1C1NHXL_enUS755US755&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=-hupXnaZoUGFnM%3A%2C02-bAcrDVNHXfM%2C_&usg=__bg_zcA-Re3JlWlFfJXa-QP-asbI%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjwtIyLqojZAhVJuVMKHZ8ODQMQ9QEINjAD#imgdii=7vV8quue6CuQ6M:&imgrc=-hupXnaZoUGFnM:

 

I can't find a whole lot of info on it yet, but I'm excited, and will probably get one when it comes out.

 

Tim

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Xenon    4,812
4 minutes ago, RottGutt said:

I agree with Xenon, my RT2600AC has been great since I got it about a year ago. I would go with the RT2600AC, since Synology has announced and will soon release a "mesh" router that will work with the RT2600AC, but not the RT1900AC. This would future-proof you if you ever move into a place that needs more coverage.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=synology+mesh+router&safe=off&rlz=1C1NHXL_enUS755US755&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=-hupXnaZoUGFnM%3A%2C02-bAcrDVNHXfM%2C_&usg=__bg_zcA-Re3JlWlFfJXa-QP-asbI%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjwtIyLqojZAhVJuVMKHZ8ODQMQ9QEINjAD#imgdii=7vV8quue6CuQ6M:&imgrc=-hupXnaZoUGFnM:

 

I can't find a whole lot of info on it yet, but I'm excited, and will probably get one when it comes out.

 

Tim

I didn't know about the mesh router! Thanks for the info. 

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PGHammer    1,266
5 hours ago, Xenon said:

I am a fan of the RT2600AC. Its over priced but it has been reliable for me. I have had no problems with range. With whatever router you get, just make sure you update the firmware when you get it.

Checking for firmware upgrades is common sense with ANY router, simply due to how long routers sit on store/warehouse shelves.  (I have had routers from Netgear, Linksys, Microsoft (yes; Microsoft was in the home-router marketplace at one point; my first router of any sort was the wired-only MN100); while it got replaced by a Linksys WRT54GS, it's still on a shelf (so is the GS); the only router that I have ever junked completely is the first Netgear router I ever owned - the original WNR3500; this had that alien Marvell TopDog chipset, and would be replaced by the WNR-3500L - Netgear's first "open-from-the-beginning" prosumer router.)

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Shiranui    1,891

Another happy RT2600AC user here.

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Xenon    4,812
52 minutes ago, PGHammer said:

Checking for firmware upgrades is common sense with ANY router, simply due to how long routers sit on store/warehouse shelves.  (I have had routers from Netgear, Linksys, Microsoft (yes; Microsoft was in the home-router marketplace at one point; my first router of any sort was the wired-only MN100); while it got replaced by a Linksys WRT54GS, it's still on a shelf (so is the GS); the only router that I have ever junked completely is the first Netgear router I ever owned - the original WNR3500; this had that alien Marvell TopDog chipset, and would be replaced by the WNR-3500L - Netgear's first "open-from-the-beginning" prosumer router.)

I think everyone had a version of the wrt54g. 

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+JHBrown    13,090

Your best bet for better wireless coverage, is to go the AP route. It's better to have two AP's running at a lower power level, than to have one running at the highest power level, trying to stretch the signal range. If you can stretch that budget just a little bit, I'd pick up two of these (two pack is $157), and put one on each floor of your house. Ubiquiti Unifi Ap-AC Lite

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+BudMan    3,368

^ exactly... Your never ever going to get full coverage of an area with single router located where ever your internet comes in.  For good wifi coverage of a large area with all kinds of walls of different material and thinkness, etc.

 

I have a small 1 floor ranch.. I have 3 AP.. One in the guest room, one in pretty much in center of house in the hallway and then one in the kitchen very close to the patio door.. This allows for decent coverage out on the patio, etc.

 

I have the unifi AC lite, LR and Pro..  And they rock for sure.. I have zero wifi issues ;) With full speed of the client no matter where I am in the house.. I see mid 300's mpbs on my iphone 7 all the time... And its not known for its rocketship wifi ;)

 

if you can not run wires to where you need to place the AP..  And just want a cheap way to get better coverage in an area.. Budget method would be to use powerline adapters for the wire.  Then either real AP or any wifi router you have as just an AP.  Otherwise then yeah you would need to go mesh.. Repeaters will cut the bandwidth /2 how a mesh works is they use a wireless connection as the uplink and different radio for the clients.. So normally how this is done if the AP only has 2 bands is 2.4 as the uplink and 5ghz is used for the clients near the AP.

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PGHammer    1,266

The issue is range to the second floor; the first floor is fine.   5 GHz N (the best performing band for modern hardware, regardless of OS) peters out past the first floor, and I am indeed considering going with either extenders OR mesh if the 2600 is not enough - fortunately, the very solution you pointed to will not only work with the RT2600AC, but can be managed from it (which solves the complexity problem); further, as you put it, I can use PoE backhaul to the RT2600AC (my current router supports neither mesh or PoE - so it would have to go anyway).  PoE makes sense when addiitonal wiring is a nonstarter - and it is here.

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Xenon    4,812
1 hour ago, PGHammer said:

The issue is range to the second floor; the first floor is fine.   5 GHz N (the best performing band for modern hardware, regardless of OS) peters out past the first floor, and I am indeed considering going with either extenders OR mesh if the 2600 is not enough - fortunately, the very solution you pointed to will not only work with the RT2600AC, but can be managed from it (which solves the complexity problem); further, as you put it, I can use PoE backhaul to the RT2600AC (my current router supports neither mesh or PoE - so it would have to go anyway).  PoE makes sense when addiitonal wiring is a nonstarter - and it is here.

This probably wont help but have you changed the channel on the 5GHz? Try the lower channels. Also, you have to remember that 5 GHz doesn't pass through walls as well as 2.4 GHz. 

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PGHammer    1,266
1 minute ago, Xenon said:

This probably wont help but have you changed the channel on the 5GHz? Try the lower channels. Also, you have to remember that 5 GHz doesn't pass through walls as well as 2.4 GHz. 

I don't use the default channels due to other routers in the area (both sides, across the street, and a new router just got added to my immediate rear).  Because the issue is on the second floor (not the main floor), it is definitely the wall/floor problem - which is also why mesh makes sense.  The problem with mesh is what do you use for backhaul if adding more wiring is a nonstarter (which is the case here).  The choices in that situation are either PoE (Power over Ethernet) or wireless - and the devices used must support them.  My current router does not support PoE - which is why I have to (rather reluctantly) consider firing it; the same issue applies to the RT1900AC.  So what I need and backhaul issues pretty much are dragging me (kicking and screaming) to the Synology RT2600AC (with or without the Ubiquiti APs referred to earlier in the thread).

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adrynalyne    11,084
2 minutes ago, PGHammer said:

I don't use the default channels due to other routers in the area (both sides, across the street, and a new router just got added to my immediate rear).  Because the issue is on the second floor (not the main floor), it is definitely the wall/floor problem - which is also why mesh makes sense.  The problem with mesh is what do you use for backhaul if adding more wiring is a nonstarter (which is the case here).  The choices in that situation are either PoE (Power over Ethernet) or wireless - and the devices used must support them.  My current router does not support PoE - which is why I have to (rather reluctantly) consider firing it; the same issue applies to the RT1900AC.  So what I need and backhaul issues pretty much are dragging me (kicking and screaming) to the Synology RT2600AC (with or without the Ubiquiti APs referred to earlier in the thread).

PoE is the wrong term here. Ethernet over Powerlines is what you should be referring to, to avoid confusion. 

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PGHammer    1,266

So EoP as opposed to PoE.  Still, the RT2600AC supports it; the RT1900AC does not (rats) so no EoP on the cheap - the RT2600AC is about $90USD more expensive than the RT1900AC).

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Xenon    4,812
26 minutes ago, PGHammer said:

I don't use the default channels due to other routers in the area (both sides, across the street, and a new router just got added to my immediate rear).  Because the issue is on the second floor (not the main floor), it is definitely the wall/floor problem - which is also why mesh makes sense.  The problem with mesh is what do you use for backhaul if adding more wiring is a nonstarter (which is the case here).  The choices in that situation are either PoE (Power over Ethernet) or wireless - and the devices used must support them.  My current router does not support PoE - which is why I have to (rather reluctantly) consider firing it; the same issue applies to the RT1900AC.  So what I need and backhaul issues pretty much are dragging me (kicking and screaming) to the Synology RT2600AC (with or without the Ubiquiti APs referred to earlier in the thread).

Yea, I would probably do what you are thinking with a mesh network if I had your problem.  You might find a mesh network system cheaper than the RT2600AC, check around. 

 

Can you keep us updated on your problem? I would like to see how you solve it. 

Edited by Xenon
Added a question.

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PGHammer    1,266
On 5/29/2018 at 4:24 PM, Xenon said:

Yea, I would probably do what you are thinking with a mesh network if I had your problem.  You might find a mesh network system cheaper than the RT2600AC, check around. 

 

Can you keep us updated on your problem? I would like to see how you solve it. 

I'm also looking at management (and I have to; network management is my job in this case) and there is no single management app that could handle the Ubiquitit APs AND my existing router; the existing router would be the fly in the potion. Synology Router Manager (standard with the RT2600AC) can also manage the Ubiquiti APs; but it is NOT installable on the Netgear WNDR3700v4 - I would still need a Synology hardware product to run everything from.  With that being the case, replacing the existing router would actually be the most sensible solution (though the least-liked subjectively).

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adrynalyne    11,084
19 minutes ago, PGHammer said:

I'm also looking at management (and I have to; network management is my job in this case) and there is no single management app that could handle the Ubiquitit APs AND my existing router; the existing router would be the fly in the potion. Synology Router Manager (standard with the RT2600AC) can also manage the Ubiquiti APs; but it is NOT installable on the Netgear WNDR3700v4 - I would still need a Synology hardware product to run everything from.  With that being the case, replacing the existing router would actually be the most sensible solution (though the least-liked subjectively).

How would Synology software manage Ubiquiti APs?

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+BudMan    3,368
8 hours ago, adrynalyne said:

How would Synology software manage Ubiquiti APs?

It can't really... But you can run packages and or vm's even on their SRM (synology router manager), which is just really their DSM (synology diskstation manager) software from their NASes.  Rebranded as RSM

 

So yeah you can run the unifi controller software in a VM or there is actually a community based package for the controller

http://synology.acmenet.ru/

 

With dsm or srm  you can do lots of stuff with packages - plex for example runs as a package.  You can run docker on dsm, not sure about srm..

 

So you take a box, install esxi on it - run some vms where 1 vm is running your routing distro, and another vm is running your unifi controller software, etc.  And you have the same thing.  Its just with one of their routers you have a pretty package.  And very easy to use software, etc.

 

 

 

 

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PGHammer    1,266
10 hours ago, BudMan said:

It can't really... But you can run packages and or vm's even on their SRM (synology router manager), which is just really their DSM (synology diskstation manager) software from their NASes.  Rebranded as RSM

 

So yeah you can run the unifi controller software in a VM or there is actually a community based package for the controller

http://synology.acmenet.ru/

 

With dsm or srm  you can do lots of stuff with packages - plex for example runs as a package.  You can run docker on dsm, not sure about srm..

 

So you take a box, install esxi on it - run some vms where 1 vm is running your routing distro, and another vm is running your unifi controller software, etc.  And you have the same thing.  Its just with one of their routers you have a pretty package.  And very easy to use software, etc.

 

 

 

 

Which is indeed what I am referring to.  The problem is that you still need a base Synology product at the core to run SRM (or DSM, which can, in fact, run most of the same packages).  Depending on how strong the core is (the RT2600AC) I may need only one AP (or even none); however, that requires an evalutation with the RT2600AC in place - so there ARE multiple reasons to toss the core router - though I hate the idea.  I don't need a NAS (or SAN); in fact, even if I did, the RT2600AC can handle that.  Networked printers?  Again, something the RT2600AC can do.  The issue is solving the most problems with both the least complexity AND at the least cost.  (The reason that none is a possibilty is due to the number of antennas on the router itself = the RT2600AC comes with four - my existing router comes with but one - and the range-limited area is in one specific are of the house's second floor (not the whole second floor).  Therefore none is possible - again, something that requires evaluation with the new router in place.)

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+BudMan    3,368

So why not get your synology router and use your existing one as an AP for whatever area you can not get current cover currently?

 

Can you run a wire to this location, can you use powerline adapters to get there?  ANY wifi router can be used as just an AP... its as simple as set its lan IP to be on your network, connect it to your network via one of its lan ports and disable its dhcp server = AP vs wifi router.

 

If you use your existing router as your AP then you have no need for running the unifi controller package even.

 

Isn't synology getting ready to release a "mesh" router/ap so you can just use this new device with the new synology router to cover the areas you need better coverage in if you can not run a wire to that location.  Be it second floor, 3rd floor.  The Garage, the basement your outside desk, etc. etc..

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