Elixir of youth and health. :)


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+xrobwx71
4 minutes ago, jnelsoninjax said:

I don't drink very much at all, I was simply responding to the OP's stupid comments and felt that I could throw alcohol in the mix and see what happened!

Also major props to you for coming to your senses and realizing that alcohol was causing you major issues, I know some people who would continue to ignore all reasoning and swear that the alcohol was not the problem at all.

By the way, shout out from Panama City Beach!

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+jnelsoninjax
Just now, xrobwx71 said:

By the way, shout out from Panama City Beach!

How's the beach life treating you? For all the years I have lived in Jacksonville (12+) I have never been to the beaches here!

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+xrobwx71
5 minutes ago, jnelsoninjax said:

How's the beach life treating you? For all the years I have lived in Jacksonville (12+) I have never been to the beaches here!

Man, I'm 48 and I avoid the beach like the plague.  I moved here when I was 15 and had a lot of fun  but now, nope.  I live 1 mile from the Gulf and I rarely, maybe twice a year go to the actual beach. 

 

Back in the day though, girls, booze, parties and more booze.

 

I hate the damn sand. Hahahaha

 

Then, there was Hurricane Michael. Holy crap.....

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+jnelsoninjax
1 minute ago, SarK0Y said:

image.thumb.png.847a0ea65f012cf094b477b077c594e7.png

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5651468/

so cute== all around of world have been screaming of pandemic, but actual market been stuffed by high toxic food, hygiene products, building materials etc-etc. :)

Just stop with this BS. OK, this is a tech forum, not a health one, most (if not all) here do not give a f*ck about this nonsense you are spewing.

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SarK0Y
17 minutes ago, jnelsoninjax said:

Just stop with this BS. OK, this is a tech forum, not a health one, most (if not all) here do not give a f*ck about this nonsense you are spewing.

tech can help to health or otherwise. Anyway, why one was needing any tech, if its health would be doomed? any engineering problem is always about the health. It's obvious for GOOD engineers :)

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SarK0Y
Quote

Frequency range 2 (> 24 GHz)

The minimum channel bandwidth defined for FR2 is 50 MHz and the maximum is 400 MHz, with two-channel aggregation supported in 3GPP Release 15. In the U.S., Verizon is using 28 GHz and AT&T is using 39 GHz. 5G can use frequencies of up to 300 GHz.[65] The higher the frequency, the greater the ability to support high data-transfer speeds.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5G

that's pretty retard logic for engineering view & then we can read next part of anecdote...

image.thumb.png.77445d1fc05da25341e0d8f4eae58624.png

so, it has no sense for really fast wireless internet == actually, each base station generates noise because there is effect of stationary wave, so noise-to-signal ratio becomes weaker/worse with increasing power. And here is simple question to technical community: why to run such absurd?🙄:)

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Brandon H
On 5/29/2020 at 8:18 PM, jnelsoninjax said:

Just stop with this BS. OK, this is a tech forum, not a health one, most (if not all) here do not give a f*ck about this nonsense you are spewing.

There is nothing wrong with talking about stuff like this in the 'General Discussion' forums. That's what this section is for. We don't have to be strictly a tech community.

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SarK0Y
Quote

Back in April, the agency noted an unusual spike in poison control center calls over harmful exposures to household cleaning products, such as bleach. The timing linked it to the spread of the pandemic coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 (not statements by President Trump). But to get a clearer idea of what was behind the rise, CDC researchers set up an online survey of household cleaning and disinfection knowledge and practices.

In all, they surveyed 502 US adults and used statistical weighting to make it representative of the country’s population. The findings—published Friday in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report—are stunning.

Overall, 60 percent said they were doing more cleaning and disinfecting amid the pandemic and 39 percent admitted to doing at least one non-recommended cleaning practice the CDC considers high risk.

The most common risky practice was washing fruits, vegetables, and other foods in bleach solutions. A total of 19 percent said they did this. From there, 18 percent said they used household cleaners—not hand soap—to wash their hands and/or other body parts. Ten percent said they misted themselves with household cleaners and disinfecting products.

https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/06/americans-are-drinking-bleach-and-dunking-food-in-it-to-prevent-covid-19/

yet another good example how hysteria boosts idiocy. in fact, no virus can kill human == virus makes numbers only upon already breached immune system & very source to destroy IS has been toxins from Air, Water, food, building materials. The very special reason to live or not stands aside of biochemical pollution, it's psyche. many humans have lived in impossible ways, but they don't mind it up to panic attack, thereby have no fears which could break into their IS.

 

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adrynalyne
3 hours ago, SarK0Y said:

yet another good example how hysteria boosts idiocy. in fact, no virus can kill human == virus makes numbers only upon already breached immune system & very source to destroy IS has been toxins from Air, Water, food, building materials. The very special reason to live or not stands aside of biochemical pollution, it's psyche. many humans have lived in impossible ways, but they don't mind it up to panic attack, thereby have no fears which could break into their IS.

 

 No virus can kill “human”? What is this nonsense?

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SarK0Y
18 hours ago, adrynalyne said:

 No virus can kill “human”? What is this nonsense?

not a nonesense, just the fact :) virus needs machinery to replicate itself & such mechanisms it can find in a animal cell or in a Bacteria. the very problem is, cells and Bacterias have quite sophisticated systems to check self-integrity + suicide (if checking was wrong) + it alarms IS about intrusion + needless to say, far not each of subdued hosts is efficient generator (most copies of virus are defected). In short, most efficient scenario has been in case of simbiotic bonds (virus does bidding of host: mostly for its IS).

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adrynalyne
6 hours ago, SarK0Y said:

not a nonesense, just the fact :) virus needs machinery to replicate itself & such mechanisms it can find in a animal cell or in a Bacteria. the very problem is, cells and Bacterias have quite sophisticated systems to check self-integrity + suicide (if checking was wrong) + it alarms IS about intrusion + needless to say, far not each of subdued hosts is efficient generator (most copies of virus are defected). In short, most efficient scenario has been in case of simbiotic bonds (virus does bidding of host: mostly for its IS).

Not a fact. Complete BS. Go visit the graves of covid victims and reassure them that a virus couldn’t kill them. 

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SarK0Y
40 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

Not a fact. Complete BS. Go visit the graves of covid victims and reassure them that a virus couldn’t kill them. 

so, emotional argument :) dig deeper in...

image.thumb.png.3f4af24208f87750e96d38af08db99e0.png

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/coronavirus-age-sex-demographics/

high death rate w/ underlying conditions has been expected. And look closer at pinpointed column == 45-64 has highest one; safe to guess, the main reason was extra hours of a work w/ poor salary. 

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adrynalyne
7 minutes ago, SarK0Y said:

so, emotional argument :) dig deeper in...

image.thumb.png.3f4af24208f87750e96d38af08db99e0.png

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/coronavirus-age-sex-demographics/

high death rate w/ underlying conditions has been expected. And look closer at pinpointed column == 45-64 has highest one; safe to guess, the main reason was extra hours of a work w/ poor salary. 

No emotion. I just don’t have the patience to listen to armchair experts and are calling you out. Nice deflection. Didn’t address what said because you know you are wrong. Even your chart shows you are wrong. 

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SarK0Y
15 minutes ago, adrynalyne said:

Even your chart shows you are wrong.

how? :)

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adrynalyne
19 hours ago, SarK0Y said:

how? :)

Serious? How do you explain the deaths without underlying issues on your chart?

How do you explain the mortality rate of Ebola? MERS? SARS?

 

This is pseudoscience and I am not going to read further, so if you need to have the last word, go for it. I am sure it will be a zinger.

 

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SarK0Y
1 hour ago, adrynalyne said:

Serious? How do you explain the deaths without underlying issues on your chart?

 

21 hours ago, SarK0Y said:

And look closer at pinpointed column == 45-64 has highest one; safe to guess, the main reason was extra hours of a work w/ poor salary.

a lot of humans have died each day due to high-stressing work + in many cases, reports miss some conditions or just don't bother to mention it .

Quote

The first case of karoshi was reported in 1969 with the stroke-related death of a 29-year-old male worker in the shipping department of Japan's largest newspaper company.[1] The term was coined in 1978 to refer to an increasing number of people suffering from fatal strokes and heart attacks attributed to overwork. A book on the issue in 1982 brought the term into public usage.

It was not until the mid to late 1980s, during the Bubble Economy, when several high-ranking business executives who were still in their prime years suddenly died without any previous sign of illness, that the term emerged into Japanese public life. This new phenomenon was immediately seen as a new and serious menace for people in the work force. In 1987, as public concern increased, the Japanese Ministry of Labour began to publish statistics on karoshi.

In 1988, the Labor Force Survey reported that almost one fourth of the male working employees worked over 60 hours per week, which is 50% longer than a typical 40-hour weekly working schedule. Realizing the seriousness and widespread nature of this emerging problem, a group of lawyers and doctors set up "karoshi hotlines" that are nationally available, dedicating to help those who seek consultation on karoshi-related issues.[2]

Japan's rise from the devastation of World War II to economic prominence and the huge war reparations they have paid in the post-war decades have been regarded as the trigger for what has been called a new epidemic. It was recognized that employees cannot work for 12 or more hours a day, 6–7 days a week, year after year, without suffering physically as well as mentally. It is common for the overtime to go unpaid.[3][4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karoshi

 

1 hour ago, adrynalyne said:

How do you explain the mortality rate of Ebola? MERS? SARS?

i'll leave it for your homework, it's so simple :)

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