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Wiring cat5 and cat6


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Bruinator

I am trying to get an understanding of cabling so I have a few questions if I may. Does cat5 look like a phone line? I know connector at the end of a phone line is called an RJ45 connector which fits in the back of a landline phone. What is the connector at the end of a cat5 called and can it be connected to a business phone?

 

Is cat6 strictly for data only? When it comes to wiring a small company, i know there are switches for cat6 cables. Is there a switch for cat5 cables with rj45 connector in which you would use for , as an example, the accounting room?    When running cables for a cubicle is it a good idea to call each cable it P1 for phone and D1 for data (PC) and run them with say a zip tie together?

 

I know this is basic info to most of you so please try not to think these are dumb questions LOL. 

 

TIA

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Matthew S.

Your close but wrong with the connectors. Phone lines are typically RJ11/RJ12 not RJ45, RJ45 is ethernet cable connectors.  

 

Cat5 thru Cat 7 can be used as phone cable but they are typically used for Networks, VoIP and PBX systems, typically Cat 3 and under are used for phone lines.

 

Cat5,6,7 and I think 8 when used in conjunction with typical RJ45 connects are all electrically compatible, for future proofing Cat6+ should be used, regardless of if your going to be running 10Gbe+ or not though it does come in at a price penalty to futureproof (Higher the Category higher the price and more difficulty to terminate the cables).

 

 

The wiki page on Registered Jacks is a good resource to learn of the different RJ jacks.

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Fleet Command

Hello.

 

Ethernet and phone cables have both similarities and differences, but can't be mistaken for each other. CAT5 and CAT6 cables are much thicker than telephone cables. Their ends are much bulkier. Telephone cables commonly employ RJ11 jacks, known as 6P4C. (You can see four copper connectors.) Ethernet cables are employ a type of RJ45 jacks known as 8P8C. (You can see eight copper connectors.) That said, you must not use the expensive CAT cables for telephone purposes.

 

CAT5 and CAT6 cables are compatible. A switch or router designed for CAT6 cables needs to have more powerful CPUs and signal capacitors to take advantage of CAT6's higher bandwidth.

 

DO NOT brutally zip-tie or aggressively bend CAT6 cables! These cables are expensive (especially if they have tinfoil shielding) and must be properly installed and terminated to meet their specifications. Their bend radius must be four times larger than the outer diameter of the cable.

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Matthew S.
4 minutes ago, Fleet Command said:

Hello.

 

That said, you must not use the expensive CAT cables for telephone purposes.

 

That is simply untrue, a lot of new home construction has started using CAT6 for POTS lines (also in a sense would make wiring a network that much simpler if the lines are already run), Where it is true is the patch cable side of things.

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Fleet Command
1 minute ago, Matthew S. said:

That is simply untrue, a lot of new home construction has started using CAT6 for POTS lines (also in a sense would make wiring a network that much simpler if the lines are already run).

Please note the word "expensive" in my sentence as well as my imperative tone. I am simply saying that upon laying cables, one must not employ the expensive shielded and braided cables, just because they happen to be in the inventory.

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Matthew S.
Just now, Fleet Command said:

Please note the word "expensive" in my sentence as well as my imperative tone. I am simply saying that upon laying cables, one must not employ the expensive shielded and braided cables, just because they happen to be in the inventory.

To be honest that's pure laziness and not forward thinking.  Think about it this way, gauge the chance of switching from a standard POTS line to VoIP, it's more expensive if your going to have to rewire everything instead of just re-terminate. 

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Fleet Command
11 minutes ago, Matthew S. said:

To be honest that's pure laziness and not forward thinking.  Think about it this way, gauge the chance of switching from a standard POTS line to VoIP, it's more expensive if your going to have to rewire everything instead of just re-terminate. 

Indeed! Laziness is the word! One engineer jury-rigged a CAT5 cable for speakers. I knew a month in advance that we eventually switch those speakers over to WiFi. Now, if the cable is in place and you want a connection NOW because there is 15,000 jobs at stake, it can't be helped. Sure, go wild! But if you're planning a new office and laying cables that aren't already there, plan properly.

 

There is local jurisdictions to consider too. Our phone companies are state-run. They don't tolerate anyone deviating from their standards, especially, when there is the signs of illegal eavesdropping.

 

And anyway, deviating from the norm is for veterans. I certainly don't recommend it in a reply meant for people who are not there yet.

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Bruinator
31 minutes ago, Fleet Command said:

Hello.

 

Ethernet and phone cables have both similarities and differences, but can't be mistaken for each other. CAT5 and CAT6 cables are much thicker than telephone cables. Their ends are much bulkier. Telephone cables commonly employ RJ11 jacks, known as 6P4C. (You can see four copper connectors.) Ethernet cables are employ a type of RJ45 jacks known as 8P8C. (You can see eight copper connectors.) That said, you must not use the expensive CAT cables for telephone purposes.

 

CAT5 and CAT6 cables are compatible. A switch or router designed for CAT6 cables needs to have more powerful CPUs and signal capacitors to take advantage of CAT6's higher bandwidth.

 

DO NOT brutally zip-tie or aggressively bend CAT6 cables! These cables are expensive (especially if they have tinfoil shielding) and must be properly installed and terminated to meet their specifications. Their bend radius must be four times larger than the outer diameter of the cable.

I meant the use of a zip-tie as a use to keep them together when cabling instead of running each cable individually twice :)

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Matthew S.
5 minutes ago, Bruinator said:

I meant the use of a zip-tie as a use to keep them together when cabling instead of running each cable individually twice :)

Use electrical tape for that, no need to waste a zip-tie.  also when you do dress your cables at the patch panel side (assuming you do use a patch panel, which you should, future proofing and all that jazz again) use double sided Velcro straps, don't use zip ties, you'll thank me for this advice later...

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Bruinator
Just now, Matthew S. said:

Use electrical tape for that, no need to waste a zip-tie.  also when you do dress your cables at the patch panel side (assuming you do use a patch panel, which you should, future proofing and all that jazz again) use double sided Velcro straps, don't use zip ties, you'll thank me for this advice later...

Yes, I saw pics of black material keeping cables together just wasnt 100% positive it was velcro.  :) Thx for clarifying that.

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the420kid

Run Cat6a instead of Cat6 for networking and/or IP phones. The price point isn't much higher but the speed and reliability are much better. You want to be future-proof anyway.

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adrynalyne
41 minutes ago, the420kid said:

Run Cat6a instead of Cat6 for networking and/or IP phones. The price point isn't much higher but the speed and reliability are much better. You want to be future-proof anyway.

Cat6a is definitely more expensive to the tune of 2-3 times the cost of Cat6. Proper terminators that make use of the drain wire add to that cost as well. 

 

Go with higher MHz Cat6 or Cat6e and call it good.

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Marujan

phone line is Cat3 with RJ11 jack

 

cat 5e for network and IP Phones with 100MB/1GB speed

cat 6 for any network devices with 100MB or 1 or 2.5GB speeds

 

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