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Golf: Essentials, lesson costs?


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My dad has been a golfer for a few years now, and he has been trying to convince me to get out and try it. Today, I did. And, I thought I wouldn't enjoy it, but coming after playing, I loved it.

So, I'm ready to take the steps into learning how to play golf. I need suggestions as to what I need, what are good brands to pick up, etc. Essentials to those in the know for a rookie. I probably won't buy much at the moment, due to college and living on my own, but my parents told me that they'll set me up with most of the things I need for golfing as a christmas gift. So, now, I'm looking.

I plan on getting lessons, but I don't know what a round estimate per lesson will run.

Also, the golfing aids, like the elbow lock; do they actually work?

Thanks in advance. I am going to need all the help I can get...

EDIT: Also, now that I thought about it... Can someone recommend a decent book explaining the rules, origins, etc. of golf.

Edited by pimpshiznid
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My dad has been a golfer for a few years now, and he has been trying to convince me to get out and try it. Today, I did. And, I thought I wouldn't enjoy it, but coming after playing, I loved it.

So, I'm ready to take the steps into learning how to play golf. I need suggestions as to what I need, what are good brands to pick up, etc. Essentials to those in the know for a rookie. I probably won't buy much at the moment, due to college and living on my own, but my parents told me that they'll set me up with most of the things I need for golfing as a christmas gift. So, now, I'm looking.

I plan on getting lessons, but I don't know what a round estimate per lesson will run.

Also, the golfing aids, like the elbow lock; do they actually work?

Thanks in advance. I am going to need all the help I can get...

EDIT: Also, now that I thought about it... Can someone recommend a decent book explaining the rules, origins, etc. of golf.

If you get the Golf Channel, watch it for their instructional shows they are helpful.

Don't spend too much money now on equipment, grab one of those full kit sets from WalMart, K.Mart, Target, whatever and expect to pay around $200ish. when you buy golf balls make sure to get "distance" labeled balls. the spin less which means they will be easier to hit straight. Down side is that they aren't as soft for putting, but it is a trade off.

I am not sure about lesson costs as I have never had lessons and it varies greatly from area to area, but lessons are a great idea - if you can find a golf

clinic going on do that. It will be a little less personalized but should be cheaper.

Take the time to learn etiquette. Being polite and courteous and sucking at playing will not make most people upset with you. But a great playing jerk is not welcome by anyone. Learn what it means to hit out of turn, crossing peoples lines, raking the traps, repairing your ball marks (very important). Best way to learn this is to play with more experienced players and watch what they do.

It is a lot of fun to only practice hitting the ball really far with the driver. Don't waste too much time doing only that on the range. Spend at least as much (if not more) chipping (little bump hits up on to the green) and putting as you will take almost half your shots from this area.

I absolutely love playing golf and here in the South I can play pretty much 12 months out of the year, it is addictive. I have a tee time in about one hour so that is probably what attracted me to this post, feel free to PM me or just carry on this thread if you want to know some more.

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Today, I went shopping.

So, don't spend anymore than $200 on a set of clubs. I was looking at the Mitsushiba Premier Gold Set for around $230 here.

Soon enough, I'll have around $700 to spend to get started. I looked at shoes, glove(s), balls, training aids, a hat, etc, and came with a round about cost of $400.

So, I'm wondering... Is it worth it to spend a little more on clubs?

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Today, I went shopping.

So, don't spend anymore than $200 on a set of clubs. I was looking at the Mitsushiba Premier Gold Set for around $230 here.

Soon enough, I'll have around $700 to spend to get started. I looked at shoes, glove(s), balls, training aids, a hat, etc, and came with a round about cost of $400.

So, I'm wondering... Is it worth it to spend a little more on clubs?

Until you can hit them it doesn't matter if they are $100 or $1000. Those look like they'd be just fine to get you started. Don't spend tyoo much yet until you know for sure that you really want to get in on it. Dick's is a good place to get cheap/clearance stuff as well as golfmsith.com.

If you go out and spend a few hours a week ont he range and putting green it will make a world of difference. Don't just go out an play a round, you'll never get better unless youare able to attempt a hot over and over until you get it right. that is something you just can't do while playing a round.

Oh and BTW, I shot a 86 today - one of my best rounds in a long long time...

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Well, first thing you should do is take lessons from the golf pro at your local driving range or course. I took 3 lessons that were like 1 1/2 hours each and it was about $250. All you need is a beginners golf set, you can pick up one at Sports Authority or some place similar for like $250-$300.

Other than the lessons, the next best thing you can do is the driving range. Go like 3-4 times a week and get a jumbo bucket (250). Use 100 for your 3-7 irons and 100 for your 8,9, pitching wedge, and sand wedge. Use 45 for your driver and 3 wood, then keep 5 and do putting for like 20 minutes. (Then, find some guy who has all the top notch equipment and who uses nothing but his driver at the range and give him those 5 balls when you're done and tell him to work on his short game.)

It's all practice man. And it's the one sport that will always be better than you. My grandparents played for about 25 years and had to quit last month. It takes time, concentration, and constant practice to keep your game even remotely good. One thing I've found really beneficial is to play on the par-3 courses. This forces you to learn your irons and wedges more.

Oh yeah, take armeck's advice and buy a golf rule book. And any course you play for the first time, make sure you ask someone who works at the desk what their specific rules and regulations are. Some places require collar shirts, pants, etc.

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Being an absolute avid golfer...don't blow your wad on clubs. Like armeck said, clubs at this stage won't matter. You'll get frustrated that you spent all that money and your game sucks. thus, you'll lose the love.

Get some lessons, go out with people who play a lot of golf (friends, preferrably) and I don't know any golfer who won't help a new guy out. They'll point out what you need to do to get better, swing mechanics, and such.

If ya lived closer, I'd take ya out on a few rounds. Been playing since I was 10...my handicap was as low as scratch...until I had to start working. :)

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Until you can hit them it doesn't matter if they are $100 or $1000. Those look like they'd be just fine to get you started. Don't spend tyoo much yet until you know for sure that you really want to get in on it. Dick's is a good place to get cheap/clearance stuff as well as golfmsith.com.
Alright. That was partly what I needed to know. I am still looking, but I'll pick up a beginners set soon enough.
If you go out and spend a few hours a week ont he range and putting green it will make a world of difference. Don't just go out an play a round, you'll never get better unless youare able to attempt a hot over and over until you get it right. that is something you just can't do while playing a round.

I plan on spending most of my time out on the range and putting green in the beginning. This was already suggested to me. I plan on going out to the range and green a few times a week, and play a game every one or two weeks in the beginning. I've got a fairly large backyard, so I can practice at home too.

Oh and BTW, I shot a 86 today - one of my best rounds in a long long time...
My game yesterday wasn't good at all. But, I am just beginning, so, that comes with the territory.
Other than the lessons, the next best thing you can do is the driving range. Go like 3-4 times a week and get a jumbo bucket (250). Use 100 for your 3-7 irons and 100 for your 8,9, pitching wedge, and sand wedge. Use 45 for your driver and 3 wood, then keep 5 and do putting for like 20 minutes. (Then, find some guy who has all the top notch equipment and who uses nothing but his driver at the range and give him those 5 balls when you're done and tell him to work on his short game.)

It's all practice man. And it's the one sport that will always be better than you. My grandparents played for about 25 years and had to quit last month. It takes time, concentration, and constant practice to keep your game even remotely good. One thing I've found really beneficial is to play on the par-3 courses. This forces you to learn your irons and wedges more.

Tip taken.

Oh yeah, take armeck's advice and buy a golf rule book. And any course you play for the first time, make sure you ask someone who works at the desk what their specific rules and regulations are. Some places require collar shirts, pants, etc.
Can anyone recommend a good rule book. There are so many, and I have no real idea as a recommendation. I asked around while looking at golf equipment today, and no one could give me a straight answer, though, I wasn't at a official golf store, and the guy didn't know much anyway. I know that all of the courses around me are collar shirt, pants, and golf shoes. Glad I live less than 5 mins away from a course and driving range.
Get some lessons, go out with people who play a lot of golf (friends, preferrably) and I don't know any golfer who won't help a new guy out. They'll point out what you need to do to get better, swing mechanics, and such.
.

I have a few friends that golf a lot. I have family (dad, grandfather, uncle) that have been golfing for a few years now and will be sure to give me lessons, so that helps.

Thanks. And anymore tips, feel free to post em. (Y)

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The hardest things in golf are hitting straight with drivers and putting. Irons are no problem, neither is bunker play or rough play. If you have good vision, hand eye coordination, depth perception and control over your bodies power, you can play with irons. One thing I always learned and still tell myself, keep your head down, do not pull it out when you swing. You end up slicing. Practice alot, go to the driving range whenever you can.

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The hardest things in golf are hitting straight with drivers and putting. Irons are no problem, neither is bunker play or rough play. If you have good vision, hand eye coordination, depth perception and control over your bodies power, you can play with irons. One thing I always learned and still tell myself, keep your head down, do not pull it out when you swing. You end up slicing. Practice alot, go to the driving range whenever you can.

IMO Bunker play is the hardest part of the game. :huh:

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there's no point to hitting balls, or practicing until you understand the concept of the swing. practicing before that point will only get you started with habits that are really bad to break. go see your local pro. they know their stuff. you need to get the fundamentals down first, imo. one of the most technical/complicated sports you can play...

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