Newbie C++ Help

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jugaaru    0

I have just started college, and we have a C programming course.

If there any good links?

How do a beginner start programming C?

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TaRaKa    0

there are some good tutorials on Game tutorials thats where i started to learn but id recomend buying The C++ programming language bj Bjarne Stroustrup

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EDF    0

I am going to learn C++.

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XanoZuke    0

Which program do I use to write C++?

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Widdowmaker    0

i use the bloodshed C++ compiler, i started with Qbasic in school during study hall and then moved on to VB 6.0 for a class. After that i went to the local college and signed up for a C++ class. The book we used was "Your first book of C++". Great book, teachs you all the way from cout to using vector graphics in a 3d enviorment.

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justin89h    0

I started making webpages using WYSIWYG editors, then started looking at the code. I went to javascript, css, then php and mysql, now im having a go at C++

I defefinetly recommend the bloodshed devc++ and winprog.org/tutorial 's windows programming tutorial.

Of course, go with web tutorials if you dont want to spend money, but if you dont mind spending, I think a book is alot easier to learn from.

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evil__donkey    0

1. ASM

I'd recommend you start with 80x86 ASM. There are several good tutorials and free books out there to learn assembly language. Learning assembly language first will give you insights into the computer that you wouldn't otherwise have if you were using a high level language.

There are several assemblers that are available for free:

1. FASM (The easiest to learn and use, Linux\Win32\DOS) (www.flatassembler.net)

2. MASM (The most popular assembler, Win32\DOS) (www.masm32.com) *

3. TASM (Unsupported, Win32\DOS) (Ask Google)

4. GoAsm (A down-to-earth assembler, Win32) (www.godevtool.com)

........

Art of Assembly Language (16/32-bit), Randy Hyde, is the most comprehensive book you'll find on assembly language for the Intel 80x86 processors.

Another good book is Assembly language for the IBM PC Family, William Jones.

C:

After you've learnt a good deal of assembly language and computer architecture, get yourself a good book to learn C. K&R was good.

C++:

If you want to learn C++, I'd say you look no further than C++ Programming Black Book, Steven Holzner. Da Best!

Good luck!

_______________________

* For MASM32, if you want to assemble 16-bit programs, you might need a 16-bit linker, which you can easily download from Iczelion's Windows assembly website.

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Schmoove    0
1. ASM

I'd recommend you start with 80x86 ASM. There are several good tutorials and free books out there to learn assembly language. Learning assembly language first will give you insights into the computer that you wouldn't otherwise have if you were using a high level language.

There are several assemblers that are available for free:

1. FASM (The easiest to learn and use, Linux\Win32\DOS) (www.flatassembler.net)

2. MASM (The most popular assembler, Win32\DOS) (www.masm32.com) *

3. TASM (Unsupported, Win32\DOS) (Ask Google)

4. GoAsm (A down-to-earth assembler, Win32) (www.godevtool.com)

........

C:

After you've learnt a good deal of assembly language and computer architecture, get yourself a good book to learn C. K&R was good.

C++:

If you want to learn C++, I'd say you look no further than C++ Programming Black Book, Steven Holzner. Da Best!

_______________________

* For MASM32, if you want to assemble 16-bit programs, you might need a 16-bit linker, which you can easily download from Iczelion's Windows assembly website.

You must be kidding.....

That is just stupid to start with ASM if you have no experience. Normally you start with something easy as Pascal or Java to learn things about loops, conditions, etc, etc. Then when you know how to do the simple things you go learn Object Oriented Programming. By that time you know how to think and how a computer reacts on your statements. Now it is a good time to dive into more complicated stuff like assembly language. If you do that first you have probably no idea what the hell you are doing anyways.

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evil__donkey    0

no i am not kidding.

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Blivrail    0

If you want to learn computer programming and have no previous experience, read up some websites about a old old language called BASIC... it's basically a language that does line by line execution, like feeding instructions into a robot. All the fundamentals of programming are pretty much there - loops, conditions, subroutines, stuff like that.

Then once you have a good feeling about it, go ahead and move onto Java... Java is an object oriented language. It isn't the simple "go from the top-to-bottom" anymore, but it's a lot neater, and much more powerful.

Finally, after Java do take a hack at C++, and a book I suggest you should read is "C++ Primer Plus" by stephen prata. It's big and blue. C++ is also object oriented, but it has a lot of symbolic notation that is confusion yet confusing (yet powerful!)

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tarlrules    0

Hey Ive also been programming since I was in middle school, (9 to 13 - uk) and I started with BASIC! I agree thats HTML is a good starting point, (it gets you used to notepad for a start - lol!) but I think C is a valuable language. Half of C++ is C anyway! I learn't like so:

1) BASIC

2) HTML

3) A little JavaScript

4) C

5) C++

6) WinAPI for C (I prefer the raw code than the simplified C++)

Also I would like to add to whoever said use "C by Example" to learn C, I agree the book is great for getting the basics of Console based C apps.

Tarl

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M9IqpK4    0

and where is ASM?

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bozthepcnerd    1

Yeah, I've been programming since I was about 12, tought myself:

1. HTML (Notepad)

2. Some basic JavaScript

3. PHP and MySQL

a. Created basic admin system

b. Created Authentication with md5 passwords

4. C++

I must admit that if you teach yourself PHP, you should be in good stead with the language, as you could pretty much copy a basic helloworld script from PHP and get it working in C++ lol

Though this is about as far as I've gotten (haha :blink: )

I do need some guidance in this field to get me further,

1. What Compiler would be most benificial, if I was doing a game programming course in UNI, i.e. MS VB 7 .NET, Bloodshed's Compiler or another?

2. Also what Books would be best to start by introducing the librarys and what they do, where you include them. Also building basic projects in windows (not DOS) and creating games using C++ with OpenGL or DirectX 9, while providing more complex projects as it goes through.

Do the O'Reilly series provide a good c++ book?

Thanks this'd be really cool :D

Boz. :)

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Prince21    0

yeah maybe you know alot of langauges but you might not now them well. plus you might not now everything.

How old are you now?

COme on at 12 years old no way you can master any language well

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dreamthief    0
and where is ASM?

assembly language

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bozthepcnerd    1
yeah maybe you know alot of langauges but you might not now them well. plus you might not now everything.

How old are you now?

COme on at 12 years old no way you can master any language well

Well, I know HTML like the back of my hand usu attached to a book for reference, not much in Java, use PHP and MySQL continously, making forum at the moment much like this with avatars and alike so pretty good at that.

I'm 17 atm only 5months till 18 yay :D

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MrCodeDude    0

Quick question, what's the difference between iostream and iostream.h? Other than I don't have to type using namespace std;?

Why doesn't iostream.h recognize cout?

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azcodemonkey    1
Quick question, what's the difference between iostream and iostream.h? Other than I don't have to type using namespace std;?

Why doesn't iostream.h recognize cout?

iostream.h is not the current standard library. It is deprecated.

iostream is the standard library.

I have no idea why iostream.h isn't recognizing cout. It should.

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Y2K    0

im a real noob, i can almost make teh 'hello world' program and i understand it but i cant get the f**kn thing to run.

i used inscite to compile it and im not sure how to run it.

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Y2K    0
iostream.h is not the current standard library. It is deprecated.

iostream is the standard library.

I have no idea why iostream.h isn't recognizing cout. It should.

umm try

#<iostream> without .h becuase its not recognised cos its too old or sumthing

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kjordan2001    164
umm try

#<iostream> without .h becuase its not recognised cos its too old or sumthing

#include <iostream>

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Y2K    0
#include <iostream>

:blush: My bad

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bithub    1
im a real noob, i can almost make teh 'hello world' program and i understand it but i cant get the f**kn thing to run.

i used inscite to compile it and im not sure how to run it.

First of all, from looking at the inscite homepage, it appears inscite is just a code editor -- not a compiler.

If the "hello world" program was compiled correctly, then an .exe file should be created.

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