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How to maintain a healthy Windows System

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Nighthawk-F117    0

Just to say I should have a big update coming in the next few days, just need to make sure on the code and get the HTML version sorted.

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Slimy    13

Just to say I should have a big update coming in the next few days, just need to make sure on the code and get the HTML version sorted.

Everest home edition is now discontinued, hope you change that :p

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zytex    0

Mate i love this well done!!! i have used some of your tips and i am very happy... thanks mate

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Outlaw S    0

Cool guide I learned some helpful things. Thanks!

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the long lost son    0

nice guide...

most of that is common sense for computer users who have a slight clue about windows... but the third party application part was very helpful :)

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xUnix    0

very simple...

Format and reinstall every 6 months... and you are good to go!

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Rigby    1,555

How to maintain a healthy Windows system? That's simple. Do a clean install, turn off the computer and put it in the closet. Leave it there for however many years you wish it to remain healthy.

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Nighthawk-F117    0

very simple...

Format and reinstall every 6 months... and you are good to go!

How to maintain a healthy Windows system? That's simple. Do a clean install, turn off the computer and put it in the closet. Leave it there for however many years you wish it to remain healthy.

Yeh, thanks for the constructive comments....

Please just don't reply if you're going to say these kind of things.

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KunalSethi    0

My recommendation just use autopatcher, it includes all the patches and needed software to protect you windows :D

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mrchetsteadman    473

Great guide Nighthawk-F117. :yes:

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Unholy Moley!    0

You assume too many things, like that the user knows what is OK and not OK in the task manager and knows where add/remove programs is. (FYI, the task manager is not always effective in showing rogue virus processes.) It's obvious to you I'm sure, but you have to think from their perspective.

There was no info for Win2k/98/ME users and the information about RAM upgrades was just poor. On the plus side, it was well organized and edited.

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Nighthawk-F117    0

You assume too many things, like that the user knows what is OK and not OK in the task manager and knows where add/remove programs is. (FYI, the task manager is not always effective in showing rogue virus processes.) It's obvious to you I'm sure, but you have to think from their perspective.

There was no info for Win2k/98/ME users and the information about RAM upgrades was just poor. On the plus side, it was well organized and edited.

Thanks for the criticism.

I'll take the first paragraph into account, although I do not feel that I should write about Win2k/98/ME when i have little to no experience with these operating systems.

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Unholy Moley!    0

although I do not feel that I should write about Win2k/98/ME when i have little to no experience with these operating systems.

Taking that into account you should rename the guide "How to maintain a health Windows XP system".

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Nighthawk-F117    0

Taking that into account you should rename the guide "How to maintain a health Windows XP system".

Might do, although a lot if the info is relavent for both Windows ME and 2000, and even Vista...:p

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intoksicated    0

thanks for this guide...

i hope that it'll make my pc faster... booting up anyways

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abcdefg    0

Most important thing is missing. It should be in basic solutions:

DON'T USE XP AS ADMIN. Use "limited" user account.

Why isn't that there? How many of you run as "user"? Everyone should do that. I do.

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Nighthawk-F117    0

Most important thing is missing. It should be in basic solutions:

DON'T USE XP AS ADMIN. Use "limited" user account.

Why isn't that there? How many of you run as "user"? Everyone should do that. I do.

Even I don't do that :p And I'm a little paranoid.

I just use the default account in windows, of course, with the name changed.

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Unholy Moley!    0

DON'T USE XP AS ADMIN. Use "limited" user account.

I had considered doing that, but time after time I read about vulnerabilities that can trash the system, admin privledges or not, so while this is does increase protection slightly, one might as well adopt a strict policy of keeping the system patched.

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abcdefg    0

"Even I don't do that And I'm a little paranoid."

Congratulations! Worst argument ever.

So you don't mind if something trashes your Windows?

Gets even worse:

" I read about vulnerabilities that can trash the system, admin privledges or not,"

I read about someone who has alien implant in his ass. So you don't keep your OS patched?

"so while this is does increase protection slightly"

Slightly? Do you even understand what it means to be admin?

No wonder that people have problems with Windows when those who write instructions for them are like you two.

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Unholy Moley!    0

Gets even worse:

" I read about vulnerabilities that can trash the system, admin privledges or not,"

I read about someone who has alien implant in his ass. So you don't keep your OS patched?

That is a total misinterpretation of our statements which, combined with your overall hostility, makes you seem like an ass. I do keep my OS patched, which is why I don't bother to run as a restricted user.

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abcdefg    0

Having a patched OS isn't "good alternative" to running as restricted user. Any piece of hostile code still has full access to your OS. That's not the case with account with "users" rights.

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Unholy Moley!    0

That's not the case with account with "users" rights.

Ehhh even if you do run as a user as opposed to an admin you can still get shafted bad. Running as a user just doens't do enough to stop malware from taking over.

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abcdefg    0

What the hell is your point? Trying to make people run as admin?

This thread is called "How to maintain a healthy Windows System"

Running as user is half-million times wiser than running as admin.

"Running as a user just doens't do enough to stop malware from taking over."

If it isn't enough then what is? Running as admin and scanning with some ****ware tool?

Just stop spamming that anti-user thing, it is far more secure compared to admin and you can't deny that.

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abcdefg    0

For those who'd like to forget their admin account:

http://blogs.msdn.com/aaron_margosis/

http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechn...n/luawinxp.mspx

What about registry cleaners?:

http://www.sysinternals.com/blog/2005/10/r...ct-of-life.html

Look down the page about half way what Mark Russinovich thinks about junk in registry and it's impacts.

"even if the registry was massively bloated there would be little impact on the performance of anything other than exhaustive searches"

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