"Throttling" Bandwidth in Apache


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Frank

I am currently running (well, my admin is "running" it) a download server for a freeware program. The program downloads (especially on a new release) go nuts and my data center pulls the server because of high usage.

What I am looking for is a way to throttle the bandwidth so the data center doesn't get ****ed when we start using too much of their connection. Is there a way to set limits on the connection speed depending on what the current outgoing transfer is? The data centers requirements are listed below.

They don't like it when your connection....

averages 10Mbps (106GB of data transfer) or more during any 24-hour period or

averages 20Mbps (53.3GB of data transfer) or more during any 6-hour period or

averages 30Mbps (40GB of data transfer) or more during any 3-hour period

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Frank

my admin mentioned mod_throttle but said in his experience it doesn't work half the time. Have you successfully used this on a server?

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Miuku.

A few years back on Solaris setups, never on Linux/BSD.

EDIT:

As a sidenote, you could setup a squid-proxy server and use it to throttle.

Check the web for instructions on this, never installed the said setup.

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[idkfa]

You can also set up traffic shaping for Apache's port(s), like described here. Look around, there are many more howtos and scripts.

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dotRoot
my admin mentioned mod_throttle but said in his experience it doesn't work half the time.  Have you successfully used this on a server?

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mod_throttle should work mostly, but I'd suggest using the FTP instead. Much easier to control throttling.

And your webhost sounds like a bunch of 'unlimited!!!!' tards. Datacenters usually don't care, because they get paid for it either way.

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Frank

I think there issue with it has something to do how they buy the bandwidth. I think it has something to do with the "95th Percentile" or something along those lines.

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Miuku.

They buy their bandwidth on the "average", where spikes of high loads take the price up. I wonder who suckered them into signing that kind of deal.

/snogs *real* unlimited bandwidth. Gotta sign only good deals :)

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dotRoot
I think there issue with it has something to do how they buy the bandwidth.  I think it has something to do with the "95th Percentile" or something along those lines.

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Dealing in the webhost business (real, not some reseller) I know all about the sales pitches and underhandedness of a lot of them out there. There is no such thing as unlimited datatransfer or space. And most webhosts are A LOT stricter on the use of 'unlimited' datatransfer. I've seen legit sites closed down, because their web traffic (not including actual file downloading except to view webpages) shut down on 'unlimited' bandwidth.

For one they don't want abuse.

Second they can't actually allot and reserve datatransfer on an account by account basis, because it is an unknown.

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The 95th percentile actually helps them as they don't get charged for the spikes...sorta. People have different perceptions and opinions on this type. Even the datacenters themselves have trouble defining it universily.

It is just better to stick to a 'limited' plan, where they won't be so strict on usage.

They buy their bandwidth on the "average", where spikes of high loads take the price up. I wonder who suckered them into signing that kind of deal.

/snogs *real* unlimited bandwidth. Gotta sign only good deals :)

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Yeah that's what the private vaults are for....yum. But I don't know anyone who would pay $1,500/month+ to host just webpages :laugh:

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