[complete noob]wants to try linux


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kaelsmith

After looking around in this forum I have some questions.

1) Are installing programs as easy as windows? there seems to be some programs where there needs some tweaking to be done. Such as firefox. Im noob so I wanta avoid that.

2) Because its a completely different file system I want to know if most windows program can work or have nix installer?

3) How hard/long does it take to get used to the nix? I dont do programing and stuff so I only really care about interface and basic stuff.

4) Does it have support for other languages, somthing like IME and stuff like that. and is it easy to switch from lang to lang?

5) Networking with windows? good or glitchy?

6) should my comp be able to run linux easily with few or no driver problems or tweaks?

AMD 64 3200+ venice

DDR400 1GB

DFI LANPARTY nf4 ultra UT

MSI ATI radeon X800XT VIVO

thanks for your time :)

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Deanobear

It's not so much of a problem of "tweaking", as knowing how to set up repositories with all the plugins and drivers you need.

To your 1) question. Installing linux progams is way easier than windows

2) Windows is Windows and Linux is Linux. You can use things like CrossOver Office which will allow you to install "certain" windows applications on your linux desktop

3) Getting used to nix is something different for everyone, but once you've made the switch... it all comes naturally

4) Every language under the sun is supported on nix, when you do your install you can specifiy which languages you want, or you can add them later

5) Networking with Windows is good... flame me if I'm wrong, but at one stage MS was using nix for servers

6) Drivers etc, 99.9% of your hardware should have no problems, it's just a case of getting the right drivers for your distro, linux is not windows, there are no "setup.exe" files that "magically" install stuff for you, 99.9% of those things are installed by your "package" manager, eg. Synaptic, Yast, Urpmi, et al.

In greater response to your first question, about Firefox, a lot of distros have only just started to have Firefox 1.5 available, the reason being is this, sure Firefox 1.5 will run on the "latest and greatest", but "back-porting" is necessary for that particular app to run on earlier versions, again... remember, nix is not windows.

With your specs, you should have no problem with nix at all, just pic the distro that suits you, make sure you have the right repository sources, and you'll wonder why you never made the switch sooner... :woot:

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markjensen

1) Most programs are easier. Use synaptic (or apt-get, etc. from the command line) to install, and to keep your entire system updated. If something is not in your online repositories (software warehouses) you have listed in your system's configuration, it can be more difficult. It can vary.

2) Do not come to Linux expecting to run your Windows apps. That is what Windows does. ;) You will likely use a different set of apps (though most are cross-platform, and can also run in Windows, such as Firefox, Thunderbird, GIMP, gaim, etc.).

3) If you can point and click, you can use Linux just fine. The harder part is learning to administer it. Try a Knoppix LiveCD for a "test drive" of Linux. (Y)

4) I don't use anything but English, but Linux is an international OS, so I would expect it to be very multi-lingual.

5) Networking in general is excellent in Linux.

6) Your ATI card will need ATI's driver to use 3D rendering. It is on their site, and usually available in many repositories, so you don't even need to visit any websites to make it work.

Again, test driving with Knoppix or some such LiveCD sounds like your best first intro to Linux. :yes:

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Rob2687

Installing stuff is easy as pie if you use a package manager. As long as you have the proper repositories all you have to do is click and install.

If you mean networking with windows as in accessing shared folders and stuff then its pretty easy too. In Ubuntu there is a network servers folder just like the networks in windows. It will search for shared folders and stuff. If that doesn't work you can enter an IP directly and it will try to connect.

There isn't much tweaking needed if you stick to the noob friendly distros...

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