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Turin or Torino


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Winter Olympics 2006  

76 members have voted

  1. 1. Turin or Turino?

    • Turin is the proper english name for the city so that is what I use
      15
    • I prefer to use the local name of Torino
      59
    • I use another name based on my non-english language
      2
  2. 2. What does your local media use? (whatever you watch/listen to the most)

    • Turin
      19
    • Torino
      36
    • An odd mix of the two
      11
    • Some stations use one, some stations use the other
      10


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The CBC bugs me. They use some odd mix or Torino and Turin. Personally I think that we should use the local names of cities instead of english translations just out of respect for the local people and the local language.

The Globe and Mail newspaper uses "Turin" exclusively but some of the sports networks (I forget if I was listing to TSN or Sportsnet) use Torino.

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I assume you mean "Torino"? I've never heard anyone use "Turino", plus the official website uses "Torino".

Since the city is actually called "Torino", I use that, but I imagine "Turin" is equally legitimate, just as Germany and Deutschland both refer to the same country and are both perfectly valid.

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I prefer Torino, since it is the original name. IMO people should use the original names in the original language used by the place.

I assume you mean "Torino"? I've never heard anyone use "Turino", plus the official website uses "Torino".

Yes, sorry, I fixed it.

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Turin, Torino is the name of the game

Italy, media tell a tale of one city and two spellings

IOC and NBC go Italian, others mix it up for Olympics

Feb. 9, 2006. 01:00 AM

FRANCINE KOPUN

FEATURE WRITER

Turin or Torino, that is the question.

If you live in the city hosting the Winter Olympics, it's Torino. Same if you're watching NBC. In this paper, it's Turin. USA Today? Torino. Listening to CBC? Well, the city is Turin, but it's the Torino Games.

It wasn't Roma. It wasn't Muenchen for Munich or Mockba for Moscow. But Valentino Castellani, chief of the Olympics organizing committee for Turin, said it decided years ago, with NBC, to give an Italian identity to these games.

As a child, he referred to New York as "Nuovo York," he said.

"Now we all say New York. I would like that, after these Games, people remember Turin as Torino."

A majority of print organizations have decided to abide by long-standing style guidelines to anglicize foreign place names when writing in English.

"It's the Shroud of Turin, for instance, not the Shroud of Torino. And when the World Cup comes to Germany this summer, we will write that games will be played in Munich, not Muenchen," said Terry Taylor, Associated Press sports editor.

Graham Parley, the Toronto Star's sports editor, said yesterday this paper is using Turin because it's consistent with Star style in anglicizing the names of foreign cities.

"We write about Rome and Florence, not Roma and Firenze. Looking ahead, we will write about the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. I hate to think how the Chinese spell it."

NBC, which has broadcast-rights to the 2006 Games, went with Torino after NBC Sports chairman Dick Ebersol visited the former national capital.

"Dick was hearing the way the locals were saying Torino, and how it's so magnificently Italian, how it rolls off the tongue," said Mike McCarley, vice-president of communications and marketing for NBC Sports. "He decided on that trip that we would call it Torino."

Even the official website of the Olympic movement reveals division on the issue, referring to "Torino 2006," but the city of Turin. Spokesman Mark Dolley said yesterday the organization follows AP style guidelines, but also wants to use the official name of the Games.

The CBC and Radio-Canada have taken slightly different approaches. The English public broadcaster is calling the event "Torino 2006," and the "Torino Games," to reflect the IOC decision to accept the Italian name. It uses Turin to describe the city.

With the possible exception of some graphic elements, the French broadcaster will refer exclusively to "Turin 2006," said Radio-Canada spokesperson Guylaine O'Farrell. "We're doing French TV, so we are using the name in French."

Jason Sordi, president of the Toronto district of the National Congress of Italian Canadians, said that, if this were 20 years ago, Canadians would be calling the city Turin, much as they say John Cabot instead of Giovanni Caboto.

"I guess Torino to me sounds like it would be a city in Italy. Turin could be in any number of places ... Germany ... France. It doesn't have a particularly Italian-sounding sound to it, put it that way," he said. "Why not say it properly? You don't have to get the pronunciation 100 per cent right on, but to make the effort to call it Torino instead of Turin is I think appreciated."

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentSe...d=1139439013197

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Mockba for Moscow

Shows what this person knows.

Mockba (cyrillic alphabet) = Moskva (latin alphabet)

Has anyone ever called Moscow mockba (thinking its in latin script)? :D

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I was born there and this is what I wanted to know for so long.

On my birth certificate it says Torino.

A soccer team my dad played for(a league that is not seen on TV) said they were called Turin .....something I dont remember.

I think its Torino but I may be wrong.

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I was born in Torino, i live in Torino, tomorrow i will start to enjoy the Olympic Games in my beautyful Torino.

I proudly love Torino.

Her name is Torino, nothing else.

That's all.

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Shows what this person knows.

Mockba (cyrillic alphabet) = Moskva (latin alphabet)

Has anyone ever called Moscow mockba (thinking its in latin script)? :D

Yup, the writer of the article was clearly thinking of the Cyrillic spelling when she spelled it out in Roman letters. For anybody wondering, Moscow looks like this in Cyrillic: Москва.

I originally read about this about 1-2 weeks ago on MSNBC (article was updated earlier today). The article interviews a few people about it and gives some reasons for saying or spelling it the way they do.

Being a daily reader of the New York Times myself (it grew on me in college when I had a free subscription to it for 2 semesters, so I just decided to continue it at a discount), I have seen it appear as "Turin" in the paper for a while already.

By the way, BroChaos, the answer to your question appears in the MSNBC article in my link above. ;)

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Is Torino the same place as the "Shroud of Turin"? Or is that a different Turin?

<edit> According to wikipedia, it is called Turin because that is how it is spoken in Piedmontese. An area in northern italy. So, this time it isn't just us english speakers butchering the language. :) </edit>

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Is Torino the same place as the "Shroud of Turin"? Or is that a different Turin?

<edit> According to wikipedia, it is called Turin because that is how it is spoken in Piedmontese. An area in northern italy. So, this time it isn't just us english speakers butchering the language. :) </edit>

Yes, it's the same Torino.

Tur?n is the name we use in Piemonte, not Turin but Tur?n.

We are italians though, so the correct name is Torino.

Ford in '70 made a beautyful car named Gran Torino...do u know Starsky & Hutch:):)

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Yes, it's the same Torino.

Tur?n is the name we use in Piemonte, not Turin but Tur?n.

We are italians though, so the correct name is Torino.

Ford in '70 made a beautyful car named Gran Torino...do u know Starsky & Hutch:):)

Yeah they (Ford) ran the Torino in Nascar through the 70s.

I only heard Torino until this afternoon. I was watching ESPN and I swear the guy that was reporting from Canada said Turin.

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Is it a Canadian thing then? :p

The Daily Show and the Colbert Report both referred to Turin, inspite of the fact that the "reporter" was standing in front of a Torino 2006 olympic banner.

But I do commend NBC for using Torino.

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The Daily Show and the Colbert Report both referred to Turin, inspite of the fact that the "reporter" was standing in front of a Torino 2006 olympic banner.

But I do commend NBC for using Torino.

haha...

Isn't Jon Stewart Canadian? :p

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Isn't Jon Stewart Canadian? :p

Biography for

Jon Stewart

Birth name

Jonathan Stewart Leibowitz

Mini biography

Jon Leibowitz was born in New York, though soon after moved to Lawrenceville, New Jersey. He graduated from the College Of William And Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. He made his breakthrough on "The Larry Sanders Show" (1992), before moving on to other roles.

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I was watching the opening ceremony this evening on CBC and Brian Williams said both "Turin" and "Torino". Not only that, but the Ottawa Citizen writes "Turin", but on my local newstation says a mix of both. Whatever, I just say "Torino".

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Don Cherry went off on a tangent about this last night, and gave the CBC crap for saying Turin. He said it's Torino, Italy. What a moron. Sure the city name is Torino, but the country name should also be Italia according to that logic (I agree, but no one will ever change that fact that we Anglicise other country's and city's names).

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