13 Reasons Why Linux Won't Make It To A Desktop Near You


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James7

I just want to say that Ubuntu Linux is here to stay on my laptop. My cousin wants it installed, and I'll do that in a few months when I next see her. My grandfather wants it on his computer, and I'll do that, well, when I can. My grandmother wants a new laptop and wants me to order a Linux one, she's is so impressed with mine (I told her I'd get her a Dell with Ubuntu).

I think Linux will win out because of all the cool things it is and can do: as someone has noted here. Think about it in big terms however you like, but the real revolution is coming, and it's coming from the average user who is fed up with the status quo and anxious for something better. :D

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Bazenga

I'm soo eager to reply but some moderators think that I'll be doing "evil" because I'm against "something" and my sig has something to do with it *Sighs*.

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TheDreamX
Because Windows is the leading OS, not because it's superior

QFT

Anyway, I use Linux on a regular basis and I know many other that do, too. While not everyone right now is ready, I believe it will prove a viable alternative for many in the future.

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myrhymeandreason
I'm soo eager to reply but some moderators think that I'll be doing "evil" because I'm against "something" and my sig has something to do with it *Sighs*.

Well, now I am interested! *Waits* lol. :)

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Lasker

I think for people who does not know about the dangerous of having a virus or spyware and visiting unknown websites that can install malicious code into the OS, I am talking about people like our parents or grand parents. I think Linux offer a good alternative for these kind of people, I am glad that my mother is in this category and she is happy using without any issue Ubuntu all the time

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Kushan
Well, Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux pronounces it "Leenooks" (or "lean-ooks" where the first part rhymes with "dean").

http://suseroot.com/about-suse-linux/how-d...ounce-linux.php

post-34335-1189624578.jpg

Linus Torvalds

Yeah, but didn't he then turn around and say that he preferred the "lin" (win) version? I mean, that's what this website is telling me and it's how I've heard most people pronounce it (I used to pronounce it line-nux lol) but perhaps you can fill me in on the truth? lol

/ˈlɪnʌks/ (?linnuks?)

This is now Linus Torvalds? preferred pronunciation, as he considers /ɪ/ closer to the original /ɪː/ than /aɪ/. It also follows the pronunciation of the English word ?linen?.

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cell tech

I think one of the main reasons Linux isn't going to make it onto the desktop anytime soon is that people want to buy a computer and programs and they just 'work'- nothing special to be done. Most people don't care about X-servers and *.conf, root, /usr, etc. because in the past (mostly since computers hit the living room in the late 80's), you just turn them on and they work and that is what people have heard and expect. There's an old axiom that a computer program is only as good as its programmer(s). Society, mainly as a whole, likes instant gratification and Linux does not provide that, for the most part, unless the computer manufacturer goes through the trouble ahead of time.

I've come across a few situations where people download a version of Linux, burn the disc(s), and wipe their drive of all traces of Windows. They then follow the setup program and something isn't working. They know they can get online and join one of many fora and get help, but when that something that doesn't work is the network adapter or video card things go downhill very fast. From that standpoint/perspective, the computer has to be sold with Linux pre-configured, since the majority of people don't want to muck with it just to make it work. Yeah, there are the techies that like to fiddle this and that but most people don't want to fiddle. Even if they buy a boxed product from a brick-and-mortar store, being told that they have to call a toll-free number to fix the problem isn't going to cut the mustard.

Apple has an advantage in the consumer *nix arena since it sells its systems pre-configured in just that way with its version on *nix (a.k.a. MacOS 10.x.x), and has retail as well as corporate support and a significant amount of 'off-the-shelf' programs that work without hassle.

Microsoft has its advantage since hardware manufacturers (read as computer systems makers) really do try to have drivers and such pre-installed and configured (mostly) so all the user has to do is turn it on, type in a name and password and everything somehow works... maybe not with "X" wireless access point or router, but the computer, bought in a box, works (for the most part) without any work on the part of the user.

When WalMart tried its hand at marketing Linspire, it worked for a while because the computers were far less than even the eMachines Windows-installed ones. It didn't last though. Partly because WalMart didn't sell any software for them... partly because the people who bought the cheapest computers didn't know squat (for the most part) about computers... partly because the computers didn't do what the people who bought them wanted them to do... and mainly because the computers were not easy to use when things went wrong, which they did in the hands of inexperienced users.

Most distro's of Linux have their fans because the fans know how to use it... those who had an idea of how to use it before they tried it. Ask yourself how many people you know who only know how to drive an automatic transmission equipped car. Ask yourself how many of those people are scared about driving a stick-shift. Of those people who only know automatics, how many want to drive a stick?

That is the mentality of many desktop users. If it does what I want, the way I want, why should I change?

*edit:

I think I should point out that there were many operating systems available in the '80s for those computers too. And usually it was just booting a 5 1/4" floppy or inserting a cartridge that did the trick.

Edited by cell tech
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markjensen
I think one of the main reasons Linux isn't going to make it onto the desktop anytime soon is that people want to buy a computer and programs and they just 'work'- nothing special to be done. Most people don't care about X-servers and *.conf, root, /usr, etc. because in the past (mostly since computers hit the living room in the late 80's), you just turn them on and they work and that is what people have heard and expect.

...

That is the mentality of many desktop users. If it does what I want, the way I want, why should I change?

While I agree with you that for a majority of people, they use what they think "just works", and their inertia will keep them with what they are familiar with. And that is Windows.

But you have to admit that saying that nothing special has to be done with Windows is also not quite accurate, either. There are several threads on best anti-virus, and best firewall, anti-adware. Businesses are making a killing selling the "clean and tune your PC" service for people that get mucked up and get lost. For these people, Windows isn't the "just works, nothing special to do" OS that you put it forth to be.

To properly administer your PC, you have to know a bit about it and set it up properly and keep it updated. To imply that Windows users don't have to do this to keep a healthy PC isn't right.

And yes, having to install yourself is a big hurdle. Fortunately, there are options - pre-installed with Dell and some others, or have a friend install and configure (which can also be a complex task for certain hardware configurations).

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rson451
8. When you ask the product's maker for help, he suggests you talk to other users. They welcome you with open arms but answer your questions in a strange language.

does this statement bother anyone else here or is it just me? if you ask a question, you get an answer. if you dont understand the answer, ask for clarification ffs.

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Barney T.
I'm soo eager to reply but some moderators think that I'll be doing "evil" because I'm against "something" and my sig has something to do with it *Sighs*.

Well, that wouldn't be me........ ;)

Any fair discussion is fine, as long as there are no attacks on others, for their personal preference.

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cork1958
Ok, what about Ubuntu? You can purchase CDs and tech support :) and it's going to really big places!

Oh yeah! REALLY big places amonst the fanboys!! About those cd's you can purchase(?) If I would've puchased those 10 cd's they sent me way back during the Hoary version, I'd have been one hot person. NONE of the 10 would install. I had to download and burn my own copy to get it to go.

Don't get me wrong, Linux is great, for those that want it. For those that don't want to jump through major hoops, there's Windows.

For Joe Blow everyday user, Linux will never get to the everyday desktop though.

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SnowRanger13

It's being seen on more and more retail systems. I have a Server next to me running Ubuntu. My OS of choice is OS X atm but I am still learning a lot from Linux, most of the things I'm learning are not hard just different then how they are done in Windows. I will admit some things are harder to do in Linux but I still support Linux and think it is great (Y).

Edit: not long till Ubuntu 7.10 and it looks promising :D

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+warwagon

you could just short'n the list from 12 down to 1

Distros

if there was just one distro then you would have better hardware, software support and less dependency problems because you would only have one version of Linux to worry about,.

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bibutteryboy
if there was just one distro then you would have better hardware, software support and less dependency problems because you would only have one version of Linux to worry about,.

exactly.

people want linux to become a desktop powerhouse then they need to work together to develope only a few different versions and have the community work on them only.

having a gazillion different versions of basically the same thing is pointless..not to mention useless to the average person.

The opensource community begs to be part of the bigger picture yet can't seem to agree on the right distro to get them there.

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rson451

'having a gazillion different versions' is what makes each version special. for instance: debian, known to be stable and for those who most likely want a system that works but will sacrifice. arch is a bleeding edge distro for people who want software the minute it is released. gentoo is for people who want complete control over their system. there are different versions for different purposes. kinda like windows xp vs windows server.

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0sit0

maybe it wont make it to a desktop near me but ubuntu runs perfectly on my desktop. Not as a main OS but I use it and love it :)

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bibutteryboy
'having a gazillion different versions' is what makes each version special.

for who? You want mom and dad to use one version and aunt emma to use another? why can't you just make 1 version that satisfies both people..at the same time.....?

there are different versions for different purposes. kinda like windows xp vs windows server.

it's nothing like windows xp vs. windows server. That's only 2 seperate versions used for 2 entirly different reasons. People using server know what it's for. people using xp probably don't even know about server.

on the other hand, who knows what version of linux works best for what situation.

the opensource community is it's own worst enemy

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rson451
People using server know what it's for. people using xp probably don't even know about server.
and people using windows probably dont know what linux is for.
2 seperate versions used for 2 entirly different reasons
did you not read what i said about gentoo/arch/debian????

i just dont understand why people bash things until they use it and give it a real chance, not a half assed "i put this cd in my drive and rebooted but its not what i expected" chance. if they did, maybe theyd see the point. if youve already done this, thats great, thanks for trying.

also, you probably use open source software and dont even realize it. the open source community doesnt only consist of people using an os that is 'never going to make it' as a desktop system so at least keep your comments more specific if you choose to continue bashing us.

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Kreuger
If I would've puchased those 10 cd's they sent me way back during the Hoary version, I'd have been one hot person. NONE of the 10 would install. I had to download and burn my own copy to get it to go.
Yeah I remember having problems with the first batch I ordered but I mean it's free so can you really complain? I've ordered two or three times since and they all worked. It just seems the first batch (which by the way was when that was a new thing) had problems. They've since been ironed out in my experience.
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1Frothy

14. Nothing that I want to use actually runs in Linux natively.

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ichi
who knows what version of linux works best for what situation.

Easy:

If you have experience with linux, all distros are pretty much the same.

If you have never used linux, then the best distro is the one you get preinstalled with your pc (or the one that would have come preinstalled if you had bought a new pc).

BTW, linux already made it to several desktops near me.

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whocares78
source and full article

I think that the first two points are slightly invalid. Look at Redhat and Novell. Too rather large players in the Linux world with commercially available and free products. They obviously have money backing. But it would seem accurate to say there is very little marketing involved. Anyone else have any ideas?

Further into the article, the author talks about the countless distros, WMs and everything else to choose from. I think we should start an ultimate newbie guide with info about the most common distros WMs, etc and provide tips to help users choose which is right for them. Then maybe part of the problem would disappear.

He also mentions vendors like IBM will soon follow Dell's footsteps in providing Linux on their machines and this just might also give a great boost in the market side of things.

personally i think the reason is it is too damn hard to do anythign if you are a NOOB. all i can say is make software installation easy, like have an installer, and people will come, make people compile up their own appiations so they can install it and they will get scared off. adn make it easy to use, as it stands ihave not seen a version of linux that is easy for a noob to use.

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Jase

What a bunch of Crock (N)

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whocares78
and people using windows probably dont know what linux is for. did you not read what i said about gentoo/arch/debian????

i just dont understand why people bash things until they use it and give it a real chance, not a half assed "i put this cd in my drive and rebooted but its not what i expected" chance. if they did, maybe theyd see the point. if youve already done this, thats great, thanks for trying.

also, you probably use open source software and dont even realize it. the open source community doesnt only consist of people using an os that is 'never going to make it' as a desktop system so at least keep your comments more specific if you choose to continue bashing us.

You assume that everyone baggging linux has never used it, i use linux and i know what linux is for, i have tried a few different versions of linux and tried to work them out, but i can't be bothered spending hours on a forum just to find out how to install an application.

i think this is a typical linux user responce, you don't like us becasue you don't now anything, why don't you linux people listen to those of use that are telling you of the issues we expierienced and what made us avoid it, and maybe just maybe deal with it in the applications and OS's instead if just saying we are wrong. hell make it easy to insatll software and i will install linux

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ichi
personally i think the reason is it is too damn hard to do anythign if you are a NOOB. all i can say is make software installation easy, like have an installer, and people will come, make people compile up their own appiations so they can install it and they will get scared off. adn make it easy to use, as it stands ihave not seen a version of linux that is easy for a noob to use.

When you say "make software installation easy" I guess you actually mean "make software installation work as in Windows/OSX", yet I fail to see how installing stuff on those is any easier than in linux :huh:

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