The Four Different Types of Linux Users


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simonlang

since ubuntu 10.04 linux advocate :D :yes:

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Reacon

I'm a dual booter. I use Windows for the sake of compatibility and games.

However, I use Mint on my netbook mainly.

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08993

Not sure Neowin has any FOSS extremists. I praise the strengths of Linux occasionally but don't feel the need to slag off Windows, at the end of the day it's a preference.

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markjensen

How about an unwitting/forced user? I.e someone who bought a netbook because it looked cool and is currently running some netbook specific flavour of linux without realising what linux even is.

:rolleyes: One would be more apt to be "unwitting/forced" to buy Windows, since it is the OS installed on 95-ish percent of computers in stores.

And, if you bought a netbook and were "duped" into Linux, you can go get it exchanged. Hardly a Linux user there, eh?

Linux Advocate:

Someone who uses Linux because they feel it is a superior[to me] or more stable operating environment. Typically this is someone who knows their way around the computer a bit and isn't afraid to post on a forum asking a question or get their hands dirty with a bit of terminal code to get their system up and running. While they love the power of FOSS they realize at the same time that the entire world does not work in this manner (although it would be great if it did). They are typically willing to use restricted codecs and closed source video drivers to get the performance and functionality they need out of their system. While it is not uncommon for them to recommend Linux to their family and friends, most times they will even help them get it setup, they realize that some people are happy with Windows and they acknowledge this.

Loves how easy Linux is to admin and use. Helps others. Doesn't hate Windows and even helps people remove Linux to get their Windows-only system back.

That's me to a T! :yes:

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AnthonySterling

Linux Advocate here!

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mak123

COMPUTER-USER...

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tiagosilva29

jUgWnl.jpg

I'm a penguin.

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afuchi

advocate here

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metallithrax

I must say that the Dual-Boot is spot on for me. Currently using XP and Mint

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Alan-

I would say I am dual-booter according to that list. Although, I really am enjoying my Linux experience, so for some I would recommend Linux as a desktop OS.

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Solid Knight

The Computer Enthusiast:

Knows what he's doing. Isn't afraid to get his hands dirty. Sometimes uses software purely for familiarization and learning purposes. Doesn't have any platform loyalties. Tries to be objective.

The four categories would have been much better defined if the writer didn't attempt to show his Linux bias in there. The computer user uses the best tool for the job yet doesn't know anything. The Dual-Booter is willing to use Linux but the only thing that keeps him away is his games or a few applications and he's somewhat knowledgeable. The Linux Advocate is knowledgeable and highly skilled but has a somewhat realistic view of FOSS. The FOSS Extremist uses Linux because FOSS is superior--many times it isn't--but has delusions.

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c3ntury

Dual-Booter. :)

Same here ^.^

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Joshie

I guess I'm a dual-booter, but it's more like I have a spare laptop that I'll throw distros at left and right while my desktop and convertible run Windows. That's an interesting summary of Linux users, but it can't hide its bias. It clearly slants toward the belief that anyone who tries Linux and isn't lazy will naturally see that it's a superior environment for computing.

Plenty of Linux distros 'just work', generally speaking. The reason I don't use it full time is because they're boring to me. Once I get them up and running (very little effort unless you're playing with something like Arch), I just sort of sit there like "Okay, what now." And I'm hard-pressed to find anything special to keep me there. I wind up going back to Windows 7 because I already own it, it does everything Linux does, and Windows versions of software generally run better.

Linux is a solid kernel, but for the love of god, that community needs to get over itself and standardize a package format. It's amazing that you STILL, after all these years, can't download ONE executable package for Linux versions of software, and double click to install it on any Linux distribution. No, seriously, there is NO excuse for that.

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bogas04

Dual Booter + Computer User

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Negi

Plenty of Linux distros 'just work', generally speaking.

I used to think that too. Until I tried Fedora. And openSUSE. And Arch.

I did manage to get them working, and within a reasonable time frame. But I also learned why Ubuntu owns the overwhelming majority when it comes to mindshare among Linux distros.

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James7

Linux is a solid kernel, but for the love of god, that community needs to get over itself and standardize a package format. It's amazing that you STILL, after all these years, can't download ONE executable package for Linux versions of software, and double click to install it on any Linux distribution. No, seriously, there is NO excuse for that.

I've always found it easy to find what I need in DEB files, which operate that way. I know that there are also RPM files (which operate similarly), but I don't know why this is a problem, having two main executable package formats. I guess it'd be nice if it were all the same, but is it really a problem that it isn't? :unsure:

I haven't tried alien (haven't needed to) but it can transform one format into another.

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bjoswald

I'm definitely under the "Advocate" category. :)

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SkyDX

I'm a fifth type :p:

The Stylist:

Someone who Dual Boots Linux to style the GUI with Compiz and RGBA and then leaves again for Windows :rofl:

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Angel Blue01

Linux Advocate, but I dual-boot with Vista for the few times I need to run something that only works in Windows.

I've always found it easy to find what I need in DEB files, which operate that way. I know that there are also RPM files (which operate similarly), but I don't know why this is a problem, having two main executable package formats. I guess it'd be nice if it were all the same, but is it really a problem that it isn't? :unsure:

I haven't tried alien (haven't needed to) but it can transform one format into another.

Unfortunately the problem is more complex than that, and a DEB or an RPM made for one distro probably won't work in another, not to mention the large number of apps that until they gain some popularity must be compiled from code. That spectacular inconsistency is what I can't stand about the approach Linux distros take towards installing programs.

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ViperAFK

The Computer Enthusiast:

Knows what he's doing. Isn't afraid to get his hands dirty. Sometimes uses software purely for familiarization and learning purposes. Doesn't have any platform loyalties. Tries to be objective.

This.

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zeta_immersion

In between the dual-boot and advocate ...

Spent years with Unix to get it to work, but do not dual book (i would rather get a separate system which I have) ...

I would love to be *nix only, sadly, games are only for windows ....

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Behemoth

Linux Advocate. Pretty much sums me up.

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Lazure

I've run into plenty of "FOSS Extremist" Types. The ones that, if anyone even so much as mentions windows, they go off on a massive hate rant saying how WINDOWS SUCKS and you SHOULD USE LINUX INSTEAD, and that you SHOULD USE TERMINAL MODE ONLY, NOT GUI. Those people annoy me to no end.

I honestly can't choose which exact area I fit into.

I dual boot Ubuntu with Windows 7, using Windows 7 90% of the time. I also have some distros as guests in VirtualBox. I use the Linux VMs when I want to test out something that might risk my security in windows (visiting an unknown website, wineing a program I'm not sure about, etc).

One of the biggest things I do in linux is play around with themes and compiz stuff. Tweaking them to my preferences. That's always fun, as I am a big fan of beautiful GUIs customized to prettyness. I like Windows 7 Aero for this reason by a large extreme.

While I recognize that Linux has serious advantages in security and sometimes stability in some regards, ESPECIALLY for servers... I also know that some Open-Source software just cannot compete with their professional counterparts (for instance, GIMP is never going to be Photoshop... Audacity is never going to be SoundForge/Audition... there's no real clear cut video ediiting software that competes well with Premiere/AfterEffects/Vegas... so on and so on). Also, Linux is extremely weak in gaming. Sure, there's a million opensource games people have created, but most of them are incomplete.. buggy.. or have horribly inconsistent graphics or other assets that make it look very poorly assembled. In other words, they only are fun for so long...

I would recommend Linux to people if they were interested in trying it out, and understood well what they'd be giving up in the process. However, I would recommend against it in other areas if Windows software is better for the job (and in many cases, this is still currently true).

Linux is a great idea, but I believe it needs to be polished more. Too many different people trying to do too many different things at one time prevents quality from ever shining.

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Neyht

Dual booter....kinda. I have linux installed on a pentium 4 in my basement.

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James7

Unfortunately the problem is more complex than that, and a DEB or an RPM made for one distro probably won't work in another, not to mention the large number of apps that until they gain some popularity must be compiled from code. That spectacular inconsistency is what I can't stand about the approach Linux distros take towards installing programs.

Yes, I see what you mean. I was reading the alien website and this issue was raised. I've pretty much stuck with Ubuntu, and that's made things easy, but I agree with you and others who call for more consistency. I don't know that it's going to happen, though, given that Linux distros don't have a central authority.

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