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Windows 8.1 UAC Learning?


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Posted

Does anyone know if the UAC in Windows 8.1 will have the learning facility?

 

I recently started to play with Windows 8 and was shocked that the annoying STILL prompt doesn't have an option like "Apply this for all future occurances" so if you say Yes to open, it doesn't nag again.

 

Am I the only one who thinks this needs to be built it?

 

I know you can turn it off, but I like it possibility that it may prompt for something which isn't legitimate (like it's meant to)

 

 

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Posted

Don't know but odds are everyone would check Apply All and then when some rogue app comes in and masks itself as IE or whatever and runs a muck people will sue Microsoft as a result.

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Posted

That would compromise your system's security, and make UAC useless, so yes, you are the only one.

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Posted

I agree with Shotta35 and Dot Matrix. A setting like that would compromise more people than we can imagine.

 

Right now, the majority of apps have been changed to work without admin priviliges, but there are plenty that still require them just out of lazyness or indifference from it's authors.

 

A clever way can be implemented, though. Perhaps combining SmartScreen with digital signatures and whitelists or something like that.

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Posted

I agree with Shotta35 and Dot Matrix. A setting like that would compromise more people than we can imagine.

 

Right now, the majority of apps have been changed to work without admin priviliges, but there are plenty that still require them just out of lazyness or indifference from it's authors.

 

A clever way can be implemented, though. Perhaps combining SmartScreen with digital signatures and whitelists or something like that.

Applocker

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Posted

If implemented, wouldn't malicious software have free rein over the application(s) that you have decided to trust?

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Posted

If implemented, wouldn't malicious software have free rein over the application(s) that you have decided to trust?

 

It wouldn't be too hard to create a piece of malware that pokes around the OS to see whats open.

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Posted

That entirely defeats the purpose of the system. That would allow any app to launch any previously blessed app elevated. Might as well not even have it if you're going to do that.

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Posted

The main reason that UAC doesn't do this is that viruses can sometimes alter the code of trusted executables and use them as a means of propagation. Having UAC constantly auto elevate them without question could lead to them being used as a means of delivering an infection. If you think you know what you're doing turn UAC off, otherwise the slight hit to usability is something you'll have to take if you want to benefit from the enhanced security UAC offers

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Posted

Don't know but odds are everyone would check Apply All and then when some rogue app comes in and masks itself as IE or whatever and runs a muck people will sue Microsoft as a result.

Yea, cause MS has ever had that worry about it with their EULA...

 

+1 for su, though your speaking of 'legitimate' has me wondering what your trigger event is.

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Posted

First thing I do, is disable uac via regedit.

Thanks, ms, but I can defend my machine myself.

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Posted

First thing I do, is disable uac via regedit.

Thanks, ms, but I can defend my machine myself.

This, I think, is the reason why I disagree with what the OP is suggesting. Those who know better can disable it. Those who don't are, in a way, safer with it.

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Posted

This, I think, is the reason why I disagree with what the OP is suggesting. Those who know better can disable it. Those who don't are, in a way, safer with it.

 

The problem is that if you disable UAC, Windows 8 apps won't work.

 

I always disabled UAC on Win7 but with Win 8 I had to settle with the least intrusive setting, which is to show the prompt without dimming the screen.

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Posted

^^ Another reason why Windows 8 is flawed in concept.  I want control of my system, dammit.  Not too much of a downside to me though, as i never use any Win8 "apps".

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Posted

The problem is that if you disable UAC, Windows 8 apps won't work.

 

Say what? Windows 8 apps work just fine with UAC disabled.

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Posted

^^ Another reason why Windows 8 is flawed in concept.  I want control of my system, dammit.  Not too much of a downside to me though, as i never use any Win8 "apps".

How does that bolster the argument of Windows 8 being conceptually flawed? User Account Control is there to protect you, is it not?
 

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Posted

Say what? Windows 8 apps work just fine with UAC disabled.

No they don't. You are confusing 'Made silent' and 'disabled'

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Posted

How does that bolster the argument of Windows 8 being conceptually flawed? User Account Control is there to protect you, is it not?
 

You're right... Windows should be dumbed down so much that users have very little control of the functions of the OS.  Oh wait.. .that sounds familiar... Want an Apple?

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Posted

You're right... Windows should be dumbed down so much that users have very little control of the functions of the OS.  Oh wait.. .that sounds familiar... Want an Apple?

How, pray tell, is Windows being dumbed down in that regard?

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Posted

You're right... Windows should be dumbed down so much that users have very little control of the functions of the OS.  Oh wait.. .that sounds familiar... Want an Apple?

 

So, you want another Windows XP, where week after week, users face a new runaway piece of malware, that's free to roam system to system and network to network?

 

What are you doing to your system that UAC gets in the way of, and why? What functions is UAC preventing you from doing?

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Posted

How, pray tell, is Windows being dumbed down in that regard?

 

So, you want another Windows XP, where week after week, users face a new runaway piece of malware, that's free to roam system to system and network to network?

 

What are you doing to your system that UAC gets in the way of, and why? What functions is UAC preventing you from doing?

You don't get it.  I'm not doing anything that UAC gets in the way of, and it's really not a bad feature, so long as you can disable it if you want without other imposed ramifications.  I just want to be able to fully control the functions and settings of my OS.  When Windows starts forcing me to do things a certain way, it's becoming more and more like a dumbed down mac or a stock phone OS.  I beleive in being able to set things the way i want.  You don't?

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Posted

You don't get it.  I'm not doing anything that UAC gets in the way of, and it's really not a bad feature, so long as you can disable it if you want without other imposed ramifications.  I just want to be able to fully control the functions and settings of my OS.  When Windows starts forcing me to do things a certain way, it's becoming more and more like a dumbed down mac or a stock phone OS.  I beleive in being able to set things the way i want.  You don't?

 

What is Windows forcing you to do? What functions and settings are you speaking of?

 

Also, why is protecting the file system "dumbed down"? Do you even understand what that phrase means?

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Posted

Whilst I agree it should be possible to disable UAC without breaking store apps, you can't really blame them for wanting store apps properly sandboxed.

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Posted

First thing I do, is disable uac via regedit.

Thanks, ms, but I can defend my machine myself.

 

What a stupid thing to say. You can't defend your machine yourself!

 

What happens when you visit a website that has some drive-by malware which your anti-virus software doesn't pick up?

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Posted

UAC is very useful in a domain environment. It avoids, in some way, users to run malware and viruses. To run these apps they need an admin password (local or domain). The only way to give them a yes or no in UAC is by putting the user in the local administrators group and by default they are not.

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