Adaptive Brightness will not disable Win8 now Win10


Recommended Posts

RickC

I don't know what to do. It is driving me crazy. None of the solutions suggested have work. I turned off the adaptive brightness feature in the advanced settings and I also disabled the sensor in the msconfig and it still lower the brightness to almost not visible. I have a Sony Vaio that came with windows 8 and upgraded to 10. It does it with both versions.

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By eRajesh
      Google Pixel 5's gap between display and body is 'normal part of the design'
      by Rajesh Pandey



      Soon after the first batch of Pixel 5 units started making their way into the hands of customers, reports started popping up of users seeing a gap between display and body. This led to concerns about the phone's water-resistance being compromised as the gap could allow for dust and water ingress. Google has investigated the matter and as per a "Community Specialist," the "clearance between the body and the display is a normal part" of the Pixel 5's design.

      Google also confirmed that the gap will not have any effect on the dust- and water-resistance of the Pixel 5 as well. Below is the entire post made by a Google "Community Specialist" David Pop on its support forums.

      Some customers had managed to get their Pixel 5 units replaced by Google for this issue. However, now that Google has investigated the issue and deemed that it is a "normal part of the design," the company is unlikely to issue replacement units for the same any more. If you are still bothered by the gap between the display and body of your Pixel 5 though, do make sure to contact Google.

      Source: Google Support

    • By eRajesh
      iPhone 12 review: The real flagship
      by Rajesh Pandey

      It has been well over a decade since Apple launched the first iPhone but every time a new iPhone is launched, it sets the standard for other Android flagships to beat. This time around, Apple has launched four new iPhone models across its iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro lineup, and it's the iPhone 12 that's expected to be the most popular of the lot.

      The iPhone 12 is the one that receives the biggest upgrade from its predecessors with a new design, better display, improved cameras, and more. How good does that make the iPhone 12 then? Is it better than other Android flagships out there? Or has Apple missed the mark somehow this year? Read my review to find out.

      Specs
      CPU A14 Bionic, 5nm fab, 16-core Neural engine GPU 4-core Apple GPU, 50% faster than any other mobile GPU Display 6.1-inch Super Retina XDR display, 2532 x 1170 (460 ppi), Haptic Touch, HDR Display, True Tone Body 146.7 x 71.5 x 7.4 mm, 164g, IP68 certified Camera 12MP f/1.6 primary shooter, 1.4um large pixels and OIS, 7P lens + 12MP f/2.4, 119-degree ultra-wide, Deep Fusion, Smart HDR 3, Front - 12MP f/2.2 | Night mode, Portrait mode, Dolby Vision video recording support Video 4K - 60fps, 1080p - 60fps, Front - 1080p - 30fps, Dolby Vision HDR recording Memory 4GB Storage 64GB, 128GB, 256GB Battery Up to 17 hours of video playback, 20W fast charging support, Qi wireless charging, MagSafe Other Features Face ID, Stereo speakers, IP68 certified up to 6m Connectivity 5G (mmWave support only in the U.S.)
      Gigabit LTE
      Dual-SIM with eSIM support
      GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, QZSS, BeiDou
      Wi-Fi 6 with MIMO
      Bluetooth 5.0
      NFC with Reader mode
      Ultra-Wideband chip Colors Black, White, (Product)Red, Green, Blue Price $799



      Design


      The iPhone 12's design is a throwback to the iPhone 4s from 2011. It has a squarish chassis with flat glass panels at the front and rear. The squarish design means the iPhone 12 can stand upright on its top and bottom corners. The chassis is the only part of the iPhone 12 that has received a major redesign. Otherwise, the front and rear design of the device is similar to the iPhone 11, with Apple only offering new color shades to distinguish the iPhone 12 from its predecessor. This also means that the dreaded notch is still there at the top of the display, though this does not bother me much as it tends to blend into the peripheral vision. The bezels surrounding the display have been reduced as well, which has allowed Apple to make the device more compact.



      The button placement on the iPhone 12 is on point as they are all within easy reach. The side key is located on the right while the volume rockers and mute switch are located on the left edge. They are all easily clickable even with a case on and there's nothing to complain about them. The Lightning port is located at the bottom between the two speaker grilles. With almost every other device I own now using USB-C, I seriously wished Apple replaced Lightning with USB-C on its new iPhones as well.

      The entire iPhone 12 series uses a more durable Ceramic Shield glass for the display which Apple claims is up to 4x more durable. While I can't put that claim to test, glass is still glass and so I will still recommend putting a screen protector on the display if you want to keep it free from scratches. The rear still uses strengthened glass from Corning.



      The most surprising part of the iPhone 12 is its weight. I have used an iPhone 11 and when I picked up the iPhone 12, I was surprised at just how light it felt. The in-hand feel, while premium, is nothing exceptional, and the device feels more like a toy with such a lightweight design. The iPhone 12 Pro with its stainless steel chassis feels much better in hand.

      I would also like to touch on the missing earphones and power adapter with the iPhone 12. While the lack of earphones does not bother me, the missing power adapter is definitely an issue. While I have plenty of USB-C power adapters, none of them can support the USD-PD 3.0 2.2A/9v profile which is required to fast charge the iPhone 12 series.

      Display


      The iPhone 12 comes with a 6.1-inch Super Retina XDR display. The display size is the same as the iPhone 11 and iPhone XR from the last two years, but Apple has switched to an OLED panel this time around. Apple tends to use the best displays on its devices and the iPhone 12's display is no exception. The Super Retina XDR display on the iPhone 12 has its brightness levels, contrast, viewing angles, and color accuracy on point. The peak brightness of the display is slightly lower than what you get on the iPhone 12 Pro but I did not have any issues while using the device even under direct sunlight or when watching HDR content.

      There's no Always-on Display support on the iPhone 12 despite having an OLED panel. If this is a feature that you have gotten used to on your existing smartphone, you might be bummed about it missing from the iPhone.

      Yes, that massive notch is still there The only missing piece of the puzzle with the iPhone 12's Super Retina XDR display is that it still has a 60Hz refresh rate. Coming from the OnePlus 8T's 120Hz display, I did notice the difference in refresh rate immediately but got used to it after a few hours. Should Apple have shipped the iPhone 12 with a 120Hz display? I do wish so. Is it a deal-breaker? Definitely not.

      Camera
      The on-paper camera specifications of the iPhone 12 might not sound very impressive when compared to other Android flagships. Apple is basically sticking to the same camera sensor and setup as the iPhone 11 series from last year, with the only exception being a wider f/1.6 aperture and a new 7P lens. This means you still get a primary 12MP shooter along with a 12MP ultra-wide angle camera. Irrespective of what the specs suggest, the iPhone 12's camera game is on point. It can take great photos irrespective of the scenario and lightning conditions.

      The only two issues that I have repeatedly noticed are that some photos end up with a warm look particularly the ones that are taken indoors. Secondly, lens flare is actually a very common issue on the iPhone 12 and it showed up more frequently on it than on any other phone that I have used recently. The front 12MP camera can also take decent selfies and the addition of Night Mode and Deep Fusion greatly helps when taking selfies in dark conditions. There is also a big gap in image quality between the primary and the ultra-wide camera. Samsung and other Android OEMs have reduced this gap by a big margin and it would have been great to see Apple doing the same as well.

      Gallery: iPhone 12 camera samples
      Video recording is another highlight of the iPhone 12. Videos shot on the iPhone 12 look amazing and the stabilization is very impressive as well. And unlike my Exynos 990-powered Galaxy S20 Plus which tends to lag and stutter after taking a few shots, the iPhone 12 remains perfectly smooth even after recording 4K 30fps Dolby Vision videos.

      The iPhone 12 offers a true point-and-shoot experience that is going to please almost everyone. For power users though, there's no Pro mode here to control the ISO, exposure, or shutter speed in the stock camera app, though you can always download a third-party app from the App Store for this.

      Performance and Battery Life


      With an iPhone, performance is the last thing you need to be worried about. Apple claims the A14 Bionic chipset inside the iPhone 12 is 50% faster in both CPU and GPU department than any other mobile chipset out there. Considering that the A13 Bionic chip inside the iPhone 11 is still faster than any other mobile SoC out there, this is not a claim that needs much verification. Some Android devices might score higher than the iPhone 12 in benchmarks but they cannot offer sustained performance, something which the iPhone can do.

      Apps open fast, heavy games run smoothly, and the phone does not bog down even while recording 4K 30fps HDR videos that are over 5 minutes in length. There are no overheating issues here as well since the A14 Bionic is fabricated on the 5nm fab from TSMC making it more power-efficient. The benchmark scores below also show just how powerful the iPhone 12 is. Android flagships have gotten faster and even ship with high refresh rate displays, but the iPhone is still the one that's hard to beat in terms of performance and smoothness.



      One thing where the iPhone 12 lags behind its competition is in terms of RAM. Various teardowns have confirmed the iPhone 12 series ships with 4GB RAM while the iPhone 12 Pro series has 6GB RAM. In regular use, you are not going to have any issues with 4GB RAM. However, if you are a heavy multitasker that frequently switches between multiple apps on your Android device, you are going to notice app reloads more frequently on the iPhone 12. It's not a bummer as most apps retain their state even after being pushed out of memory and they reload fairly quickly as well but it's something that might affect a certain section of users. I did not really have any issues with the limited RAM on the iPhone 12 despite running multiple heavy apps and games and switching between them frequently.

      Apple hyped 5G a lot when it launched the new iPhones last month. However, 5G is still not available in most markets of the world including where I live. While 5G might be a big deal in the future, there's not just enough incentive right now to go and upgrade to a 5G iPhone right now.

      As for battery life, the iPhone 12 is not going to win any awards in this department that is until you consider its form factor. I was able to get a day of battery life from the phone with around 30% left in the tank, though my phone usage has gone down due to the pandemic. An hour or so of video calls throughout the day though and I had to plug the phone into a charger by around 9 pm. When you look at the iPhone 12's size though, you realize that the battery life it offers is actually quite impressive. There are barely any Android devices in this form factor and even flagship Android phones like the Galaxy S20 series cannot offer the same battery life as the iPhone 12 despite coming with bigger batteries.

      Software


      The iOS 14 experience on the iPhone 12 is going to be similar to any other iPhone that you have. With iOS 14, Apple has revamped the home screen experience by adding support for widgets. There's now also the option to change the default browser and mail app to a third-party one. And in typical Apple fashion, the company has further improved the privacy features and now there's even an option to grant an app with access to only selected photos from one's library. Picture-in-Picture mode has also finally made its way to iOS 14 which means you can finally watch Netflix while browsing the web or jot down notes while on a video call.



      iOS still has its own set of restrictions and issues like you cannot record calls, the Notification Center still requires work and is not as slick as that of Android, and more. However, if you can live in Apple's walled garden, iOS will reward you with high-quality apps and games.

      Conclusion


      If you are looking for a reasonably-sized flagship smartphone that ticks all the important boxes -- a great display and design, all-day battery life, great cameras, and smooth performance, the iPhone 12 is perhaps the only choice you have, and a great one at that. There's simply no Android device with the same form factor that can rival the iPhone 12. Plus, when you factor in that you can use the iPhone 12 for the next 4 years easily without any issues, it becomes an even better phone to own.

      If you already own an iPhone XS or an iPhone 11, I won't recommend upgrading to the iPhone 12. However, for iPhone X and older owners, the iPhone 12 is definitely going to be a worthy upgrade. And if you are frustrated with all the Android flagships out there for some reason or another, the iPhone 12 is the one to go for.

    • By Namerah S
      Budget smartphones with great displays in India
      by Namerah Saud Fatmi

      About two weeks ago, we attempted to examine budget smartphones under the microscope. The goal was to look at the very definition of a budget device. We also explored some of the most common factors that become decision-making points for buyers.

      Over the next few weeks, we will embark on a quest to further consider and analyse affordable phones that fit the picture. We aim to highlight budget phones that tend to excel in select categories. This should help our readers make wiser decisions based on their preferences and personal tastes.

      For the purpose of this article, we will be looking at reasonably priced devices that fall in the price bracket of ₹13,000 to ₹18,000 in the Indian market. Without further ado, here are some of the best budget phones for people weak in the knees over big, beautiful displays.

      Samsung Galaxy M31s and Galaxy M31
      It is impossible to start off this list for the Indian market without mentioning Samsung devices. The Korean smartphone maker is perhaps one of the only brands in the region offering bright OLED displays on budget devices. The Samsung Galaxy M31s sports a Super AMOLED Infinity-O Display measuring 6.5-inches wide. It has a cutout notch placed dead in the centre of the display. Made out of Gorilla Glass 3, the screen has a 1080 x 2400 FHD+ resolution and a brightness level of up to 420 nits.

      Although the Galaxy M31s released in August at a launch price of ₹19,499, the budget phone is currently available in the Indian region for ₹18,499. Those who are looking for a similar device with a waterdrop notch instead can also take a look at the Samsung Galaxy M31. It features a slightly smaller 6.4-inch Super AMOLED Infinity-U display with the same brightness level. The Galaxy M31 is currently available for purchase at a price of ₹15,499.

      Image via Samsung IndiaSamsung Galaxy F41
      Next up we have the Galaxy F41 which hit the Indian market earlier this month. The Galaxy F41 boasts a 6.4-inch Full HD+ Super AMOLED Infinity U Display with a 2340 x 1080 resolution. There is a teardrop notch in the middle of the screen for the front camera. Its screen has a peak brightness of 420 nits and a wide 110% NTSC colour gamut. The Galaxy F41 sits on the lower end of the budget price bracket, selling at a retail price of ₹15,499 locally.

      Poco X3
      Who says a decent display must be an OLED? Yes, it goes without saying that they are inherently better, but with a tight budget expectations need to be lowered a tad bit. On the other hand, the lack of an OLED panel doesn't necessarily translate to a bad display. With an IP LCD screen that has a dazzling 120Hz 'RealityFlow' refresh rate, Xiaomi's Poco X3 is living proof of this concept.

      The Poco X3 features a large 6.67-inch screen with a 20:9 FHD+ resolution and a pixel density of 408ppi. A cutout on the front houses the phone front camera and is situated in the top centre of the display. As for the durability of the glass, users don't have to worry much as it is made of Corning Gorilla Glass 5. The affordable smartphone is available in a variety of different colours and is priced at ₹16,999.

      Oppo A53
      Image via Oppo India Oppo A53 is a device that does fairly well in the display sector despite having an IPS LCD. Sporting a 6.49-inch display, the smartphone bears a screen-to-body ratio of 89.2% and has a max brightness of 480 nits. It has a 90Hz refresh rate and a touch sampling rate of 120Hz, resulting in a smooth user experience.

      For people who prefer the design aesthetic of pinhole cutouts on displays, this is a suitable device. The Oppo A53 would be great for people who love those quirky wallpapers that are available for some of the more premium smartphones. Unfortunately, the A53 loses points when it comes to the resolution which is merely 1600×720. At an asking price of ₹15,490, some might call this phone a bargain while others might not.

      Image via realme Indiarealme 7
      Roughly two months ago, Chinese smartphone manufacturer realme announced the realme 7 for the Indian market. The device features a 6.5-inch Full HD+ LCD display with a resolution of 1080 x 2400. It has a 90.5% screen-to-body ratio and 90Hz refresh rate. This, of course, means that the animations and transitions feel really smooth while using the device. Following what has now become a popular trend, the realme 7 also sports a punch-hole notch on the far left corner of the display. As for the price, budget shoppers can expect to pay ₹15,000 and upwards for the device.

      With that, we conclude our list of recommendations for frugal buyers. What did you think of our selection of budget smartphones sporting great displays? Which device would you prefer if your budget fell in the aforementioned price range and the focus was on the display quality? Let us know in the comments below!

      As an Amazon Associate, Neowin may earn commission from qualifying purchases.

    • By Namerah S
      Budget smartphones with great displays in the U.S.
      by Namerah Saud Fatmi

      About two weeks ago, we attempted to examine budget smartphones under the microscope. The goal was to look at the very definition of a budget device. We also explored some of the most common factors that become decision-making points for buyers.

      Over the next few weeks, we will embark on a quest to further consider and analyse affordable phones that fit the picture. We aim to highlight budget phones that tend to excel in select categories. This should help our readers make wiser decisions based on their preferences and personal tastes.

      For the purpose of this article, we will be looking at reasonably priced devices that fall in the price bracket of $250 to $300 in the US market. Without further ado, here are some of the best budget phones for people weak in the knees over big, beautiful displays.

      Image via Samsung USSamsung Galaxy A51
      Samsung introduced its mid-range Galaxy A51 along with a 5G variant of the same model to the A series of smartphones earlier this year in April. The Galaxy A51 sports a 6.5-inch Full HD+ Super AMOLED display. It has a resolution of 1080 x 2400 and a pixel density of 405ppi. As it is an Infinity O display, the device has a punch-hole cutout in the dead centre of the screen. The smartphone also has a fingerprint sensor under the display.

      Officially the Samsung Galaxy A51 retails at an upper mid-range price of $399. However, at the moment several cheaper variants of the phone can be found on Amazon and other retailers.

      Xiaomi Mi Note 10 Lite
      The Xiaomi Mi Note 10 Lite was announced at the beginning of the pandemic back in April. In an unusual move, the Chinese smartphone manufacturer decided to opt for an AMOLED display for the Mi Note 10 Lite. It also features a 3D curved Gorilla Glass 5 panel and has an in-screen fingerprint sensor. The 6.47-inch display has a 2340 x 1080 FHD+ resolution with HDR10 and a brightness range of 430 nits to 600 nits.

      The Xiaomi Mi Note 10 Lite also has a TÜV Rheinland low blue light mode certification, a high contrast ratio of 400000:1 and DCI-P3 colour gamut. Although the launch price for the Mi Note 10 Lite was €349 for the European market, there are cheaper versions available in the US. Those looking can find the affordable Xiaomi device on Amazon for $304 and upwards.

      Image via Xiaomi GlobalUMIDIGI S5 Pro
      UMIDIGI is a Chinese brand that mainly focuses on making mid and lower-tier smartphones. It released the UMIDIGI S5 Pro as an affordable flagship phone - you read that right, 'affordable' and 'flagship' used together in the same sentence. The S5 Pro's selling point is its generous 6.39-inch AMOLED Ultra FullView Display. There is no notch, instead, a pop-up camera replaces the front camera that is usually placed on the front of the phone.

      The screen of the UMIDIGI S5 Pro has a 2340 x 1080 FHD+ resolution, an under-the-display fingerprint sensor and a screen-to-body ratio of 93.1%. As for the price, this budget device will set customers back $269.99 through the official UMIDIGI store or $299.99 via Amazon.

      Image via UMIDIGIPoco X3 NFC
      Who says a decent display must be an OLED? Yes, it goes without saying that they are inherently better, but with a tight budget expectations need to be lowered a tad bit. On the other hand, the lack of an OLED panel doesn't necessarily translate to a bad display. With an IP LCD screen that has a dazzling 120Hz 'RealityFlow' refresh rate, Xiaomi's Poco X3 NFC is living proof of this concept.

      The Poco X3 NFC features a large 6.67-inch screen with a 20:9 FHD+ resolution and a pixel density of 408ppi. A cutout on the front houses the phone front camera and is situated in the top centre of the display. As for the durability of the glass, users don't have to worry much as it is made of Corning Gorilla Glass 5. The affordable smartphone is priced at $287.99 and upwards on the official Xiaomi store on Amazon.

      realme 6 Pro
      It is very difficult to get your hands on a realme device in the US. This is because the Oppo-subsidiary mainly focuses on the Indian market. However, a select few of the brand's smartphones have started to become available in the US recently. The realme 6 Pro is one such device and it can be purchased in the American region via Amazon.

      Although the realme 6 Pro features an LCD screen, the large 6.6-inch display has a refresh rate of 90Hz which improves the quality of usage. The screen has a dual-camera cutout on the far left corner to accommodate the front snappers. It also has a 2400x1080 FHD+ resolution, a 90.6% screen-to-body ratio and is made of Corning Gorilla Glass 5. US-based buyers can purchase the realme 6 Pro for around $304 on Amazon.

      Image via realme India With that, we conclude our list of recommendations for frugal buyers. What did you think of our selection of budget smartphones sporting great displays? Which device would you prefer if your budget fell in the aforementioned price range and the focus was on the display quality? Let us know in the comments below!

      As an Amazon Associate, Neowin may earn commission from qualifying purchases.

    • By eRajesh
      Samsung receives approval from U.S. government to supply display panels to Huawei
      by Rajesh Pandey



      In a respite for Huawei, Samsung Display has received the necessary approval from the U.S. government to supply the Chinese company with smartphone OLED panels. Samsung Display had applied for a license to the U.S. Commerce Department to supply display panels to Huawei after the latter banned any company using U.S. technology from supplying components to it.

      Samsung is the first South Korean company to receive approval from the U.S. Commerce Department to supply any kind of components to Huawei. LG Display, SK Hynix, and Samsung Electronics have also applied for licenses to supply components to Huawei but that has not been approved yet.

      The report from Yonhap citing industry insiders claims that the U.S. government might have given Samsung Display the license since display panel are relatively less sensitive products compared to semiconductors. Huawei can already secure OLED panels from Chinese display maker BOE. Huawei is not expected to increase its procurement of display panels from Samsung until it can secure a steady stream of other key components for its future smartphones.

      Apart from Samsung Display, Intel and AMD have also received the necessary license from the U.S. government to supply their processors to Huawei.

      Source: Yonhap