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Your observations on Windows 8.1 update 1 (a.k.a. Feature Pack)

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#91 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 22:35

Windows Media Player is largely despised - even in Windows 7; in fact, it has been largely despised since XP.  Name one group of post-XP users tha still uses WMP as tthe default for ANY file format - audio OR video.  The same applies to Photo Viewer - or even MSPAINT (both of which are also still around, and have gone nowhere).

I use photo viewer as the default photo viewer and mspaint (for misc. things like saving as a different file type, saving print screens, drawing arrows in an image to point things out, etc.)... non tech users will use whatever the defaults are under most circumstances.

 

EDIT1: I leave WMP as the default on my systems, but I don't use it. I just right click and open with MPC-HC.

EDIT2: I just remembered, I do use WMP as my player for audio files. Just not video files. 




#92 TheExperiment

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 22:36

Windows Media Player is largely despised - even in Windows 7; in fact, it has been largely despised since XP.  Name one group of post-XP users tha still uses WMP as tthe default for ANY file format - audio OR video.  The same applies to Photo Viewer - or even MSPAINT (both of which are also still around, and have gone nowhere).  I still use both, because they are very simple, and thus quite suitable for simple tasks (primarily screen-captures and editing thereof - largely cropping in Paint's case) - however, while I WAS a heavy user of WMP with XP, that was only until I could replace it with a lighter application that suits my needs better (and wound up replacing it with multiple applications, because, as much as I wish, there is no single application that suits my needs for every audio and video file).  The ModernUI versions exist BECAUSE the desktop applications are so heavily despised.

I wouldn't say despised, so much as passed over for better options.



#93 CJEric

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 23:01

The ModernUI versions exist BECAUSE the desktop applications are so heavily despised.

Why wasn't improving the desktop apps an option? 



#94 Auditor

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 00:28

Windows Media Player is largely despised - even in Windows 7; in fact, it has been largely despised since XP.  Name one group of post-XP users tha still uses WMP as tthe default for ANY file format - audio OR video.  The same applies to Photo Viewer - or even MSPAINT (both of which are also still around, and have gone nowhere).  I still use both, because they are very simple, and thus quite suitable for simple tasks (primarily screen-captures and editing thereof - largely cropping in Paint's case) - however, while I WAS a heavy user of WMP with XP, that was only until I could replace it with a lighter application that suits my needs better (and wound up replacing it with multiple applications, because, as much as I wish, there is no single application that suits my needs for every audio and video file).  The ModernUI versions exist BECAUSE the desktop applications are so heavily despised.

I like WMP and it is good media player. The only sometimes we have is codec issues. 



#95 CJEric

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 01:28

You know, I'm really enjoying this update. Feels very smooth with nice little improvements across the board. Once again a step in the right direction, as far as I'm concerned. :)



#96 mzta cody

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 02:11

After the update the OS feels smooth, overall feels a bit snappier. Notice certain animations are quicker- minimizing and close in particular. I notice an almost imperceptible difference there. Disk usage after cleanup is about the same as pre-update.

A little tip I just heard about is that Windows key + T brings up the taskbar in a modern app, and it indeed does so.



#97 subcld

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 04:10

I've used almost all operating systems what ever they do i'll adapt and move on



#98 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 04:48

I've used almost all operating systems what ever they do i'll adapt and move on

But, what if they all move to command line only interfaces with virtual keyboards? What will you do then? :-p I know I won't be adapting. I'll just disown technology and be a hermit.



#99 Dot Matrix

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 05:52

Why wasn't improving the desktop apps an option? 

What desktop apps? There are no desktop versions of popular consumer apps.



#100 TheExperiment

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:01

But, what if they all move to command line only interfaces with virtual keyboards? What will you do then? :-p I know I won't be adapting. I'll just disown technology and be a hermit.

Well considering we're talking about reality here I just don't see that happening. :)



#101 i_was_here

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:05

What desktop apps? There are no desktop versions of popular consumer apps.

WMP and Windows Photo Viewer. If as PGHammer says that the ModernUI apps are set as default because they are better than their desktop counterparts, why not improve the desktop apps? If there are both ModernUI and desktop applications for viewing images or videos, why does the ModernUI version get set as the default app?



#102 Dot Matrix

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:03

WMP and Windows Photo Viewer. If as PGHammer says that the ModernUI apps are set as default because they are better than their desktop counterparts, why not improve the desktop apps? If there are both ModernUI and desktop applications for viewing images or videos, why does the ModernUI version get set as the default app?

It was pretty clear that with Windows 8, Microsoft was looking to cut the legacy cord, and make a fresh start. Thanks to a vocal few, they came running back, and went full retard in throwing desktop components where they don't belong in an apparent panic. Instead of creating system unity, they created more system disunity. I'm honestly afraid that's what they'll do more of in Windows 9, and if you ask me, it's not going to end well for them. The desktop has had its run. It's stale, largely legacy, extremely clunky, and has little life in it at this point in the eyes of developers and consumers alike. But (again) thanks to a vocal few, we'll be stuck in a rut for the next 10 years as they scream, and cry because they feel Microsoft is taking away their manhood. Microsoft is right to be cutting it loose. Too much legacy has never been a good thing.

 

WMP hasn't received a worthwhile update since the Vista days, and Windows Photo Viewer hasn't been updated since about the same time period. Hell, Microsoft has apparently even abandoned the Live Suite of applications. The downside to these applications is that they don't tie into Microsoft's new services at all, nor do they have equivalents on Windows Phone. Metro applications do. So it only makes more sense to develop these new Metro applications over their deprecated desktop counterparts.

 

Many people call these applications "mobile applications," but I don't see them as such. These applications are exactly what applications should be. Simple, and easy to use. There is no written rule that just because I'm on a desktop, I need to be running intensive, clunky programs full of buttons, menus, and other eyesores.



#103 Lord Method Man

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:16

Nice update. I really think they may be getting their act together.



#104 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:17

It was pretty clear that with Windows 8, Microsoft was looking to cut the legacy cord, and make a fresh start. Thanks to a vocal few, they came running back, and went full retard in throwing desktop components where they don't belong in an apparent panic. I'm honestly afraid that's what they'll do more of in Windows 9, and if you ask me, it's not going to end well for them. The desktop has had its run. It's stale, largely legacy, extremely clunky, and has little life in it at this point in the eyes of developers and consumers alike. But (again) thanks to a vocal few, we'll be stuck in a rut for the next 10 years as they scream, and cry because they feel Microsoft is taking away their manhood. Microsoft is right to be cutting it loose. Too much legacy has never been a good thing.

I sometimes wonder if you are being serious when you write things about the desktop being legacy, clunky, etc. This has been stated before on neowin, but MS specifically stated that the desktop wasn't legacy in posts on their blog (I believe others and I have said as much to you before). It's worth noting that you can't arbitrarily make something legacy when the majority of the user-base, developers, and applications are there. Deprecating the desktop would have meant the demise of Windows for corporate and professional use so I rather doubt that was ever on the table from MS's viewpoint.



#105 Dot Matrix

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:22

I sometimes wonder if you are being serious when you write things about the desktop being legacy, clunky, etc. This has been stated before on neowin, but MS specifically stated that the desktop wasn't legacy in posts on their blog (I believe others and I have said as much to you before). It's worth noting that you can't arbitrarily make something legacy when the majority of the user-base, developers, and applications are there. Deprecating the desktop would have meant the demise of Windows for corporate and professional use so I rather doubt that was ever on the table from MS's viewpoint.


I am being serious. The desktop is largely legacy. Win32 dates back how many years now? Computing is moving off in another direction that the desktop just doesn't work with. It either needs updated, or completely trashed all together (hence legacy).

It's completely clunky, there's no unified Control Panel, there's archaic settings, and menus thrown all over the place remaining from only God knows when, and there's registry settings that no one at Microsoft has any idea about anymore.

And if there's still a developer base for it, then they must have one hell of a cloak, because I don't see very many left. Where I work, less than 10% of the applications we run are native, the majority being delivered to users through the browser. In the consumer/educational space, forget it - They're off in Apple and Android land.

Keep on mind, this is just the technical aspects. Windows still has (unfairly) an image problem in the eyes of many people. The idea that Windows suffers from many problems and requires extensive upkeep still persists.

Either way you look at it, Windows as a whole is unsustainable. It either needs cleaned up, or completely re-done, which is exactly what Microsoft was attempting to do with Windows 8.