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Dot Matrix

Internet Explorer 10 now interacts with the color of your Windows 8 theme.

But IE already does that in the RP:

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Anthonyd

The change would happen depending on the theme/color you picked when you installed the OS. If they could make it be dynamic like the color of the flag in the charm bar is then why not? It's just another level of customization. Besides how many users do you have on your systems? Because I just have one, me.

I have :

-Administrator

-Guest

-Me

-Homegroupuser

Anyway, I don't see why the OS should be customised after the preference of a single user & I don't think they should increase the booting time for a fancy effect that stays few seconds on screen.

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George P

Why would it increase the booting time? It's a static image as far as I know, they can have multiple versions with the different preset colors that you have to pick during install. Since when did changing the image add to boot times? Besides, watch the flood of people saying how they don't like the blue color and that it should be something else show up more and more.

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Jan

But IE already does that in the RP:

No it doesn't...

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Dot Matrix

No it doesn't...

My bad. I see they are talking about the tiles on the homepage, not the address bar taking on the theme color.

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PGHammer

Why would it increase the booting time? It's a static image as far as I know, they can have multiple versions with the different preset colors that you have to pick during install. Since when did changing the image add to boot times? Besides, watch the flood of people saying how they don't like the blue color and that it should be something else show up more and more.

Also, consider the folks complaining that, if anything, Windows 8 boots too quickly (compared to older flavors).

Despite the age and composition of my testbed, the *boots-too-fast* argument admittedly makes sense.

My hard drive is far from the fastest sort (it is, in fact, a Caviar Eco-Green that started off life inside a MyBook), and the motherboard it boots is based on the Intel G41 chipset and ICH7 southbridge - consumer-stable/corporate-stable and dates back to Windows XP (Service Pack 2, to be precise). Windows 8 Release Preview not only boots faster than 7, but even faster than XP64 - which utterly defies logic.

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  • 2 weeks later...
guru

running the RTM here... cant seem to find anythng thats not mentioned yet. other than the Nvidia RP driver r302

(?) crashes Win8 hard with only restore fixing it.

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djdanster

running the RTM here... cant seem to find anythng thats not mentioned yet. other than the Nvidia RP driver r302

(?) crashes Win8 hard with only restore fixing it.

How did you get a hold of it? AFAIK it's not leaked yet.

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guru

How did you get a hold of it? AFAIK it's not leaked yet.

if i tell you, then i'll have to kill you :p seriously, its just a matter of time now for RTM leak.

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FiB3R

4scrd4.jpg

lol

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SiCKX

How did you get a hold of it? AFAIK it's not leaked yet.

It is. x64 N.

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djdanster

It is. x64 N.

Yea it just happened to leak about 20 minutes after I posted that :p

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  • 2 weeks later...
calimike

@MS_nerd tweeted Microsoft has reworked how the desktop looks in narrow snap view for RTM. By Windows 9, multitasking could very well be awesome.

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