iPad Survives 100,000+ Foot Fall From Space Near Area 51 (High-Res)


 Share

Recommended Posts

.

.

http://g-form.com -- G-Form, a company well known for delivering the most extreme electronics

cases and athletic pads, launched an iPad clad solely in the company's 6oz Extreme Edge

case into space and then let it free-fall back to Earth.

The company released a stunning hi-def video Thursday where the nearly naked iPad is shown

hanging above the Earth in the blackness of space. In the video, the iPad is lifted to over 100,000

feet by a weather balloon which bursts at altitude, then releasing the iPad to free-fall to Earth

where it crash lands on a rocky hillside in the Nevada countryside. Perhaps even more

remarkable than the dramatic hi-def footage itself is the fact that the iPad survives the

adventure, remaining fully functional.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The altitude has little to do with it, once terminal velocity is reached it not going to get any quicker. Wonder what the TV would be for an iPad??

Still impressive though, plus the camera survived too.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gotta love that. They got lucky the screen diden't land face down onto the rocks though, that would have been a game changer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing like having faith in your product though:

Disclaimer for Consumer Electronic Protection Products

G-Form?s warranties are in lieu of all other warranties, expressed or implied, including without limitation the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose, or the ability of the product to protect any device or personal property from any specific incident or impact, and the buyer and/or user assumes all risks arising out of or related to the selection and/or use of the product. Under no circumstances will G-Form be liable for any damages to, or replacement cost for, personal property either inside or outside the G-Form product, nor will G-Form cover damage to the G-Form product inflicted intentionally or from abuse by the user. Examples of G-Form protection in incidents filmed by G-Form or by other related or unrelated parties do not constitute a statement that the product will necessarily protect equipment from similar incidents. In no event shall G-Form be responsible for incidental or consequential damages or loss of profits or data or other loss or use of any kind.

Please Note: We're happy that some of our customers' electronics have survived their testing our Extreme products, but we don't encourage or recommend intentionally dangerous stunts, and although we are confident that G-Form provides the best protection available, we can't guarantee your electronics from damage from any specific drop or impact in our Extreme products whether accidental or intentional.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about testing other tablets for durability instead of just the iPad or iPhone or anything else with the Apple logo on it? I'm sure there's a bunch of other tablets that can survive the same fall or a greater fall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about testing other tablets for durability instead of just the iPad or iPhone or anything else with the Apple logo on it? I'm sure there's a bunch of other tablets that can survive the same fall or a greater fall.

Are you seriously this touchy? Who cares? You know this can protect others pads too, they choose the iPad obviously for marketing reasons, why does this irks you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

According to my very rough calculations (unsure of the exact drag coefficient of an iPad) it looks like it's terminal velocity is about 30 miles per hour.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you seriously this touchy? Who cares? You know this can protect others pads too, they choose the iPad obviously for marketing reasons, why does this irks you?

Yeah.. No, better get off that high horse before you fall off. I'm not touchy nor do I even care and this definitely doesn't irk me in any way, by the way are these tests conducted by Apple or some third party? It was a legitimate question, next time don't be such a prick and jump to assumptions. ;)

Unless they were hired by Apple to do this or it was Apple doing this themselves I don't see any reason for them to only test Apple products and not anything else.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok first of all, space starts at around 62 miles up, which is 327,360 feet. So to say it fell from space is inaccurate. I'd like to see it fall from space and likely be burned up in the atmosphere, but still would be interesting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok first of all, space starts at around 62 miles up, which is 327,360 feet. So to say it fell from space is inaccurate. I'd like to see it fall from space and likely be burned up in the atmosphere, but still would be interesting.

If they did actually drop it from space, wouldn't it just be stuck in low earth orbit for a while instead of dropping back to the earth?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If they did actually drop it from space, wouldn't it just be stuck in low earth orbit for a while instead of dropping back to the earth?

Likely yes, unless something knocked it from it's orbit. So good point, obviously it isn't in "space" and as someone said before, you can drop something from 5000 feet or 100,000 feet, the speed will be the same that it falls at. It really depends on what it hits when it makes it to the ground on if it is going to be broken or not.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok first of all, space starts at around 62 miles up, which is 327,360 feet. So to say it fell from space is inaccurate. I'd like to see it fall from space and likely be burned up in the atmosphere, but still would be interesting.

The video is just named wrong. He clearly said "near space" in the video. You can get to about 100,000 ft or so using a balloon, and any higher requires a rocket of some sort. That wasn't the point of the video though...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless they were hired by Apple to do this or it was Apple doing this themselves I don't see any reason for them to only test Apple products and not anything else.

Use the market leading product to get more interest in your PR. Wow, that simple...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not sure wether to be impressed with the iPad or the special case, or both.... but that's cool.

It must be the case. My sisters iPad with its case on didn't survive a 2 foot fall onto ceramic tile.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, let me get this straight, they dropped a steel bar from space, having no clue where it was going to fall, to demonstrate that they could protect an iPad? That doesn't seem completely reckless to anyone?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not touchy nor do I even care and this definitely doesn't irk me in any way

Yet you're here, and commented.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share