Recommended Posts

+jnelsoninjax

A court clerk who watched hardcore pornography during a rape trial 'because he was bored' was caught looking at the explicit material right under the nose of the judge.

Debasish Majumder, 54, accessed the obscene images while the victim gave her harrowing evidence at Inner London Crown Court.

He looked at photographs of topless women being gagged and couples engaged in sexual acts, Kingston Crown Court was told.

However the judge, who was sitting directly behind him, spotted the filthy pictures as the prosecution evidence was being given.

Majumder, who had worked at Inner London Crown Court for a number of years, later admitted routinely watching porn while trials were taking place.

A search of his home computer found more extreme images, including child pornography.

Annabel Darlow, prosecuting, said: 'Majumder was working as a court clerk at Inner London and his conduct constituted a wholesale abuse of his position and the equipment provided in that he viewed porn sites on his court computer whilst the court was engaged in the conduct of a trial on an allegation of rape.'

He made the searches as the victim gave her evidence and throughout the prosecution case.

Judge Nigel Seed QC spotted a search list of explicit sexual language and at another point saw an image of a blonde engaged in a sex act on a man.

While he was in the courtroom, Majumder also looked at pictures of topless women gagged, it was heard.

Ms Darlow said: 'Judge Seed noticed what was taking place. He initially hoped that he had been mistaken or the behaviour would desist.

'On December 10 he did take action and drew the attention to the matter of the resident judge.'

When police investigated, they not only found pornography searches in the history of Majumbder's work computer but also child and extreme pornography images on his home computer.

Ms Darlow said: 'He had been working as a court clerk for a very considerable number of years and it could not have been more clear that using court computers to access or research pornography would have been anything other than clearest possible case of gross misconduct.

'The internet history was entirely representative of how Majumder chose to pass his days in court.'

Between December 9 and 10 2010 during the rape trial Majumder viewed roughly 30 images, the prosecution alleged.

He confessed to police it was not the first time he had used his time at work to search for porn.

Ms Darlow said: 'He said that he watched a lot of internet porn, he said that at work there were moments in his day that were boring and he would surf the net not to get access to sites but to get the titles of sites to use on his home computer and normally sites were blocked.

'He said that nobody in the court would be able to see what he was looking at on his screen apart from the judge and the judge would not be able to read the names as the print was too small.

'He said he only looked at porn if the case was boring and did so once or twice a week. He had been carrying out this type of behaviour since the December of the previous year.'

Majumder pleaded guilty to one charge of misconduct in public office and five counts of possession of indecent images.

On his home computer police found a number of pseudo porn images of children and 12 extreme porn pictures.

He had his sentencing postponed for further medical reports until later this month.

Susannah Stevens, defending, said that a stroke her client suffered roughly eight months ago could have affected his mental state.

She said: 'The stroke and Mr Majumder?s cognitive state might explain the complete breakdown of his thought processes and his ability to tell right from wrong and that is of huge importance when it comes to sentence.'

Majumder, of north London, may also face a separate hearing before sentence after he called into question the number of photos he accessed while in court.

Source

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Xinok

There's something wrong with how this story was written. This is the impression I got:

COURT CLERK CAUGHT WATCHING PORNOGRAPHY DURING TRIAL!!!

btw, he was also in possession of child pornography, but that's not the main story...

Link to post
Share on other sites
Charisma

>.< Watching women bound up and gagged, during a rape trial, that just seems 31 flavours of wrong.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+jnelsoninjax

There's something wrong with how this story was written. This is the impression I got:

COURT CLERK CAUGHT WATCHING PORNOGRAPHY DURING TRIAL!!!

btw, he was also in possession of child pornography, but that's not the main story...

Majumder, who had worked at Inner London Crown Court for a number of years, later admitted routinely watching porn while trials were taking place.

Link to post
Share on other sites
+Xinok

I understand that, but the story only gives a few scant mentions of the fact that he had child porn. I don't know what the laws in the UK are regarding that, but in the US, that'll easily get you several years in prison and registered as a sex offender for life. I think that's deserving of a little more attention.

Link to post
Share on other sites
HardyRexion

:uberhump: :drool:

:huh:

Facepalm of the decade.

Watching porn, in front of a judge??

The bigger question is, Who hired this IQ deficient imbecile for a London Court??? :huh:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
FMH

That's so silly. Watching in front of a judge.

But I wonder how many judges are involved in such behaviour. Because no one can see what they are doing. :woot:

Link to post
Share on other sites
jakem1

I understand that, but the story only gives a few scant mentions of the fact that he had child porn. I don't know what the laws in the UK are regarding that, but in the US, that'll easily get you several years in prison and registered as a sex offender for life. I think that's deserving of a little more attention.

You're right, the article is very poorly written but it is, after all, the Daily Mail. There's clearly more to this story because it's not clear why the police were involved or why his house was searched. The charges don't stack up either - if child porn was really found on his PC then he either wasn't charged with it or they just threw the indecent images charge in because there wasn't enough evidence for a proper kiddy porn charge.

Either way, he was stupid to view porn at work but it seems unfair to charge him with a crime rather than just sack him/reprimand him.

That's so silly. Watching in front of a judge.

But I wonder how many judges are involved in such behaviour. Because no one can see what they are doing. :woot:

Some judges just sleep in court while others masturbate. :laugh:

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
what

Had a smile on my face as I read through that. You couldn't make it up :p

Link to post
Share on other sites
dead.cell

>.< Watching women bound up and gagged, during a rape trial, that just seems 31 flavours of wrong.

Yeah, that is pretty messed up...

Link to post
Share on other sites
Glassed Silver

You know what they say... Don't judge what you haven't tried! :p

Must be thrilling in a full court room! :p

Glassed Silver:mac

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dead_Monkey

I understand that, but the story only gives a few scant mentions of the fact that he had child porn. I don't know what the laws in the UK are regarding that, but in the US, that'll easily get you several years in prison and registered as a sex offender for life. I think that's deserving of a little more attention.

Depends, per the story:

"On his home computer police found a number of pseudo porn images of children and 12 extreme porn pictures."

What is 'pseudo porn'? Does it mean it's not porn? Does it mean they aren't children? Pseudo implies it isn't really child porn.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Glassed Silver

Depends, per the story:

"On his home computer police found a number of pseudo porn images of children and 12 extreme porn pictures."

What is 'pseudo porn'? Does it mean it's not porn? Does it mean they aren't children? Pseudo implies it isn't really child porn.

Pseudo sounds like they want to broaden their asset for court... Nothing more :/

Either it is porn or it isn't.

Is it? -> there are laws

Is it not? -> Well, not exactly worthwhile mentioning in that regard

Glassed Silver:mac

Link to post
Share on other sites
DDStriker

:uberhump: :drool:

:huh:

Facepalm of the decade.

Watching porn, in front of a judge??

The bigger question is, Who hired this IQ deficient imbecile for a London Court??? :huh:

Another IQ deficient imbecile :)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
ThePitt

"He only looked at porn if the case was boring and did so once or twice a week" :laugh:

Link to post
Share on other sites
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By zikalify
      Remittance company, Wise, set to go public with direct listing
      by Paul Hill



      The financial services and remittance company, Wise (formerly TransferWise) has announced that it will go public via a direct listing, according to a report from CNBC. Once the paperwork has gone through, the firm will be listed on the London Stock Exchange through a direct listing – rather than an initial public offering (IPO).

      The reason given by the company for doing a direct listing rather than an IPO is that it doesn’t want to raise capital for its operations. Through a direct listing, Wise will not need to find underwriters nor will it need to issue new shares. According to CNBC, the fact that Wise will be listed on the London Stock Exchange rather than the New York Stock Exchange is good for Britain which is trying to get more tech firms listed on its exchange.

      Speaking during a conference call, Kristo Kaarmann, CEO and co-founder of Wise, said:

      In addition to the direct listing, Wise has been emailing customers to ask whether they’d like to join its OneWise shareholder programme. Those that participate would be able to receive bonus shares worth up to £100 after 12 months to further increase future returns.

      Once the firm is listed, it should be quite popular among investors as it has been profitable since 2017. In the 2021 fiscal year, it reported profits of £30.9 million and revenues of £421 million. The year before, profits came in at £15 million and revenues were at £302.6 million which shows the company has been growing well.

      Wise offers very low fees on its remittance services making it very competitive. While not yet achieving these levels, Wise’s low transfer fees are a step towards the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 10.c which states ‘By 2030, reduce to less than 3 per cent the transaction costs of migrant remittances and eliminate remittance corridors with costs higher than 5 per cent’.

    • By zikalify
      UK government urged to subsidise broadband for those on low-incomes
      by Paul Hill



      The UK government has been urged to offer vouchers to low-income homes to encourage more people to begin using ultra-fast gigabit broadband, according to BBC News. The advice was delivered as part of a report compiled by the Gigabit Take-up Advisory Group (GigaTAG). The report also called on employers to offer staff discounts on the service, especially now that more people are working from home.

      In the GigaTAG report, the authors said that a number of barriers prevent low-income households from connecting to gigabit internet. It said:

      Responding to the report, Digital Infrastructure minister Matt Warman said that he would be considering the recommendations of the report. He said that the government wants to make sure everyone can benefit from these fast speeds, no matter their background.

      As things stand, gigabit seems a little bit futuristic to most people given that in the UK it is only available in a quarter of UK homes and there’s currently not a lot of need for such high speeds. When we fast forward to 2025, however, when augmented and virtual reality will be more widespread, people will need higher speeds than are currently available so it’s important that the government establishes how it plans to ensure everyone has access.

      The GigaTAG group was formed at the request of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). Its membership includes Which?, Confederation of British Industry, Federation of Small Businesses, Ofcom, Broadband Stakeholder Group, Internet Service Providers’ Association, Be the Business, DCMS, and Good Things Foundation.

    • By zikalify
      UK MPs ask Biden to drop Assange charges during G7 trip
      by Paul Hill



      Members of Parliament (MPs) from several UK parties have asked President Biden to drop the charges against Julian Assange which have caused him to be holed up in various locations over the last decade. The request was made in the form of a letter and signed by 24 MPs from the Conservative Party, Labour Party, Green Party, and the Scottish National Party. The official Wikileaks account on Twitter posted the letter in full.

      In the letter, the MPs said that it was hypocritical of Western governments to call for greater press freedom around the world, while at the same time holding Julian Assange who worked with The Guardian and New York Times newspapers to publish leaked U.S. government documents that Wikileaks had been provided with.

      In the letter, the MPs write:

      In 2019, the U.S. government unsealed an indictment against Julian Assange which said he was charged with conspiracy to commit computer intrusion. He is currently being held at Belmarsh Prison in London and last year was denied bail after citing the coronavirus as District Judge Vanessa Baraitser believed he could break the bail conditions.

    • By Jay Bonggolto
      Google vows to let UK's competition regulators oversee its online tracking changes
      by Jay Bonggolto

      Google tried to assuage growing online privacy concerns in 2019 by introducing new web standards that would put limits to how advertisers access user data to target their ads as part of the Privacy Sandbox project. The goal was to control third-party cookies that allow unauthorized tracking on the web with new digital advertising tools. Earlier this year, though, the UK's Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) launched an investigation into the project.

      Now, the CMA has announced that it has secured Google's commitments to limit how it uses data in order to address privacy and competition concerns. The competition watchdog is now seeking feedback from interested third parties before it accepts Google’s commitments.

      Privacy Sandbox involves assigning users to a cohort based on their interests while keeping their identity private. This method lets a browser analyze the users' habits on-device without sending them to a server. The changes, however, have sparked concerns that Google's replacement for third-party cookies could hamper competition in the digital advertising space.

      As part of its commitment, the search giant vows to not access synced Chrome browsing histories once third-party cookies are eliminated. This will presumably prevent Google from favoring its own advertising business or websites at the expense of its rivals.

      In addition, the company promised to give regulators a say on the results of its testing of alternatives. The CMA can request a "standstill period" of two months if Google fails to address any of their outstanding concerns. During this period, they can reopen an investigation and implement interim measures.

      The CMA and the Information Commissioner's Office will consult on Google's commitments until July 8 with input from third parties. The regulators also noted that these commitments will be legally binding if accepted.

    • By zikalify
      Raspberry Pi publishes new book for computer history buffs
      by Paul Hill

      The Raspberry Pi Foundation has announced the launch of its latest book The Computers That Made Britain. In this book, author Tim Danton looks at the home computer boom that took place in the UK in the 1980s, covering 19 different computers including the ZX Spectrum, BBC Micro, and Commodore 64. In this book, Danton not only tells the stories of these computers but provides insights from the people behind them.

      Discussing the book, Raspberry Pi’s Digital Content Manager, Alex Bate, said:

      The computers covered in this 300-page book are the Acorn Archimedes, Acorn Electron, Apple II, Apple Macintosh, Amstrad CPC 464, Amstrad PCW 8256, Atari 520ST, BBC Micro, Commodore 64, Commodore Amiga, Commodore PET 2001, Commodore VIC-20, Dragon 32, IBM Personal Computer (5150), Research Machines 380Z, Sinclair QL, Sinclair ZX80 and ZX81, and the Sinclair ZX Spectrum.

      The Computers That Made Britain is now available for purchase on the Raspberry Pi Press Store and can be bought in-person from the Raspberry Pi Store in Cambridge as well as Waterstones. As with all other Raspberry Pi-published books, a PDF version of the book is also available for free from the Wireframe website.