Ingress - Google's Augmented Reality MMORPG


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Looking at the chat logs for Enlightened in a 20km radius, there were 2 other people talking.

My mate got his invite too but we've not met up today.

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Not surprisingly (considering my luck with D3, and various other betas I wanted to get into), I am yet to get an invite. Signed up the day the site went live, and a couple times after that.

i have been in every Blizzard Beta and several google Beta's a hundreds of other random beta tests however i do not think i have ever waited this long to get into a beta before lol.

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Got invite today too after waiting for about a month. And meh, **** crashes too much.

Tested it while walking the dog and couldn't do really much. Just collected a few xm and hacked a terminal that the game created for me as there was no portal available near by. And all these two poor missions were done with about 12 crashes. Had to restart the phone a few times too, as I couldn't force close the application and it was stuck in the background with frozen picture (every time you opened the application) and sucking up battery life by communicating to the server and using the GPS.

Will try to skip the tutorial section and give it another go tomorrow. If it will keep crashing, I'll just wait for the final version.

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Got in last night. Did the first bit of the tutorial (Collecing XM) however there are no terminals near me, even when it says it will make one. Will have to give it a go tonight.

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Just to add a bit of fuel to those awaiting a key. I got mine about a week ago. Not had time to check it out yet tho :(

But I signed up a good while ago, i.e about a month or so at least.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 months later...

Has anyone got a spare invite code for Ingress? It would be really appreciated if one could be sent my way.

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  • 2 months later...

Out of invites. Been playing for over a month now. Level 4 now. It is best played with a group. My family plays and we are pretty effective in taking over portals. Especially the drive by ones. Started off slow because of minimal nearby portals but the game lets you add them into the game.  

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