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Windows 8 Sales are actually Amazing - 40 million sold

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+LogicalApex    1,747

Defeats the purpose of live tiles, don't you think? Metro and Apple's LaunchPad are two different concepts.

It does, which isn't a problem for many users such as myself. I like Live Tiles on my phone, where I'm limited to a few seconds to see the info because I'll be stepping on a train in a few seconds, but I really can't stand them on my desktop; especially promoted so highly without an off switch as they are in Windows 8.

But I am a programmer and we are a different breed of power user ;)

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I am Not PCyr    9

to the guys who went to the trouble to reply to me earlier..

you never read what i said.. as usual lol

i said the concept of windows 8 is good and makes sense but what they did in reality turned out bad..

edit:

I will add more.. I think Windows 8 is an idea to make the system more aproachable compatible and useful

and i'm not against that idea. And the more i thiink of less experienced users the more windows 8 makes sense to me.

and i fully understand that tech has to progress ..that goes whith out saying but i guess it doesn't if i'm writing this lol

I say this because peopel are making me out to be a maniac.. someone who thinks Windows tech should be frozen in time

and i have no where said or implied that, rather its been put into my mouth or infered by fanboys period .

i'm not gonna re write what i said because it makes no difference as usual you guys READ what you want

rather than what was actualy VERY carefuly thought out and submitted..

Re read what i said and then gimme your Kodak and OS2 comments lol

So nope no way no how was my comment anything other than a reflection of what we see with our eyes..

re-interpreting what i said by gleening over comments and reading between the lines is not very realistic now is it ?

Like i said.. desperate piece fitting dulsional insanity.

I said million times and i'll say it again..

The fanboys and cheerleaders are insane and have gone off the deep end.

You guys can't even read what was written and you wanna jungle symantecs and logic with me ?

Spare me..

Come back and have a chat with me when you learn how to read fanboys lol

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10thmandown    1

Really don't get all the hate.

Been using 8 at the office for two months now (MSDN) and it's very good.

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HawkMan    5,232

Windows 8 is so hard to use that my girlfriends mother who is really bad at using computer and has only used XP and maybe a bit of vista, who got her new xmas present laptop in the mail yesterday, set up the computer all by herself and has been playing on it all day...

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I am Not PCyr    9

He is right though. There are tools in both Paint.Net and Photoshop that eliminate the need for precision as you describe. The Magic Wand, for example. I know when I work in both, I don't need to be accurate down to the pixel.

Kinda funny you say that because i do gfx work and its almost always by zooming in betwee 400 and 1600 x

and i write graphics by the pixel.. writing out each pixell one by one.

The last project i did like this was a Rockbox Theme i made from scratch and submitted using Fireworks.

So no your wrong and ONLY a mouse would work to do the job (atleast no touch screen bs anyway)

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I am Not PCyr    9

Most Pro Windows 8 people have made it abundantly clear that windows 8 has a lot of keyboard shortcuts, which is great. If your hands are already on the keyboard, keyboard shortcuts make a lot of sense.

But if you hand is already on the mouse, it takes more clicks to navigate as apposed to windows 7. Mostly from activating hidden menu's and buttons. Sure they have right click menus, but there again, for one of them you have to jab your mouse into a hidden pixel in the bottom corner of your screen.

as i'm reading your comment i was leaning back in my chair with my right hand on my mouse..

and your telling me i should upgrade and then sit up straight and put both hands on teh keyboard and learn keyboard combo's ?

and yeah i know plenty of them.. been there and done that for 10+ years

Can you say wrench in the workflow ?

Your retort is just sad lol

Keyboard shortcuts ? gimme a break

edit

hey spud..

"I can't believe this thread is still going.. how do people have so much time to hate something they apparently will never use?"

you say ?

why because i have no choice to deal with WIndows 8 as a computer repair guy etc

i have machines sitting beside me ready for pickup when i type out this stuff..

and like i already said and was ignored or as Dotmatrix put it

he did not understand a single word of what i said for some strange reason lol (good excuse too dodge everything i said)

I believe in the truth and this story headline is Propaganda !

Just like the claims about speed etc

Learn how to read.

Learn how to tell lthe truth

Learn how to be objective.

Learn to how understand that people shouldn't be hearded like cattle into conforming into ONE way of doing something because YOU say so..

We have desktop PC's for us to use as we choose to use them.

All the hate ?

nope try "all the truth"

things would be quiter if you guys would stop lying through your teeth to make windows 8 look good period .

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HawkMan    5,232

Kinda funny you say that because i do gfx work and its almost always by zooming in betwee 400 and 1600 x

and i write graphics by the pixel.. writing out each pixell one by one.

The last project i did like this was a Rockbox Theme i made from scratch and submitted using Fireworks.

So no your wrong and ONLY a mouse would work to do the job (atleast no touch screen bs anyway)

Noone's EVER said to use a touch screen for photo editing(granted what you're describing isn't anyway). a tablet would work better anyway, but that's besides the point.

As for touch screens not being usable in photoshop at all, look at last years MS CES presentation where MS, Adobe and Wacom together showed off a prototype Cintiq with multi touch and the possibilities that entailed for those making original art and graphics. but this doesn't really apply to GUI graphics since they are made entirely differently.

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I am Not PCyr    9

God i still can't figure out why this site's forum edit boxs are showing with grey text and a black background :/

i can't see what i'm typing and i can't type very well :(

anyway i wanna stay on topic here as best i can..

The story headline implies other things and i figured i'd take a look and see what it says at wikipedia

considering it should be pretty neutral ? I was surprised to see what it said was what i feel is what i have

been trying to say all along (while the usual people here dodge me and say i have no idea what your talking about)

So to those that fail miserably to understand what i say maybe check out what this says.

My opinion would be the same as what is written at wikipedia whether its for or against the new OS

In other words i think what is written over at wikipedia seems like a fair and accurate snapshot of Windows 8 at present.

So I think this does a wonderful job of backing up what i was saying earlier..

http://en.wikipedia....ows_8#Reception

Reception

Reviews

Reviews of the various editions of Windows 8 have been mixed. The Verge felt that Windows 8's emphasis on touch computing was a significant aspect of the platform, and that Windows 8 devices (especially those that combine the traits of both laptops and tablets) would "[make the] iPad feel immediately out of date", due to the capabilities of the operating system's hybrid model and increased focus on cloud services. Some of the included apps in Windows 8 were considered to be basic and lacking in certain functionality, but the Xbox apps were praised for their promotion of a multi-platform entertainment experience. Other improvements and features (such as File History, Storage Spaces, and the updated Task Manager) were also regarded as positive changes.[109] Additionally, Peter Bright of Ars Technica felt that while its user interface changes may overshadow them, Windows 8's improved performance, updated file manager, new storage functionality, expanded security features, and updated Task Manager were still notably positive improvements for the operating system. Bright also felt that Windows 8's duality towards tablets and traditional PCs was an "extremely ambitious" aspect of the platform as well, but still criticized Microsoft for emulating Apple's model of a closed distribution platform when implementing the Windows Store.[110]

The interface of Windows 8 has been the subject of mixed reaction. Peter Bright of Ars Technica felt that the "Edge UI" system of hot corners and edge swiping "wasn't very obvious" due to the lack of instructions provided by the operating system on the functions accessed through the user interface, even by the video tutorial added on the RTM release (which only instructed users to point at corners of the screen or swipe from its sides). Despite this so-called "stumbling block", Bright felt that Windows 8's interface worked well in some places, but began to feel incoherent when switching between the "Metro" and desktop environments, sometimes through inconsistent means.[110] Tom Warren of The Verge felt that the new interface was "as stunning as it is surprising", contributing to an "incredibly personal" experience once it is customised by the user. However, at the same time, Warren felt that the interface had a steep learning curve, and was awkward to use with a keyboard and mouse. However, it was noted that while forcing all users to use the new touch-oriented interface was a risky move for Microsoft as a whole, it was necessary in order to push development of apps for the Windows Store.[109]

Several notable video game developers criticized Microsoft for adopting a similar "walled garden" app distribution model to other mobile platforms with the introduction of the Windows Store?since they felt it conflicted with the traditional view of the PC as an open platform, due to the store's closed nature and certification requirements for compatibility and regulation of content. Markus "Notch" Persson specifically refused to accept help from a Microsoft developer to certify his popular game Minecraft for Windows 8 compatibility, replying with a request for the company to "stop trying to ruin the PC as an open platform."[111] Gabe Newell (co-founder of Valve Corporation, who developed the competing software distribution platform Steam) described Windows 8 as being a "catastrophe for everyone in the PC space" due to the closed nature of the Windows Store.[112] Rob Pardo from Activision Blizzard agreed with Gabe Newell by saying: "nice interview with Gabe Newell - "I think Windows 8 is a catastrophe for everyone in the PC space* - not awesome for Blizzard either".[113] Industry Veteran Casey Muratori had similar concerns.[114]

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes from ZDNet wrote: "The biggest problem with Windows 8 is that it wasn't born out of a need or demand. Its design failures, particularly with ?Metro UI? will likely be its downfall."[115]

Philip Greenspun called Windows 8 a "Christmas gift for someone you hate."[116]

Market performance

Microsoft says that 4 million users upgraded to Windows 8 over the weekend after its release,[117][118] which CNET says was well below Microsoft's internal projections and have been described inside the company as disappointing.[119]

On 27 November 2012, Microsoft announced that it has sold 40 million licenses of Windows 8 in the first month, surpassing the pace of Windows 7.[5] However, according to research firm NPD, sales of devices running Windows in the United States have declined 21 percent compared to the same time period last year.[120]

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Dot Matrix    7,438

It does, which isn't a problem for many users such as myself. I like Live Tiles on my phone, where I'm limited to a few seconds to see the info because I'll be stepping on a train in a few seconds, but I really can't stand them on my desktop; especially promoted so highly without an off switch as they are in Windows 8.

But I am a programmer and we are a different breed of power user ;)

So, whatever happened to our PM conversation?

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BajiRav    2,137

It does, which isn't a problem for many users such as myself. I like Live Tiles on my phone, where I'm limited to a few seconds to see the info because I'll be stepping on a train in a few seconds, but I really can't stand them on my desktop; especially promoted so highly without an off switch as they are in Windows 8.

But I am a programmer and we are a different breed of power user ;)

I understand what you are saying but is it really big deal that you cannot

1. unpin or metro apps from start screen on first boot

2. pin your applications+tools to start screen and/or taskbar?

It seriously takes one winkey stroke or enter or a single click to get to desktop. :/ XP to Vista/7 added similar multi-step operations that were a simple click such as the Power menu or Network settings and I have not seen people complain about it at this scale.

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+LogicalApex    1,747

I understand what you are saying but is it really big deal that you cannot

1. unpin or metro apps from start screen on first boot

2. pin your applications+tools to start screen and/or taskbar?

It seriously takes one winkey stroke or enter or a single click to get to desktop. :/ XP to Vista/7 added similar multi-step operations that were a simple click such as the Power menu or Network settings and I have not seen people complain about it at this scale.

Being a programmer I'm a hyper power user and I prefer to have the ability to adjust the way I work to be what I feel is best for me. Average users don't do this and don't want to do this. I'm aware of this, and is why my complaints about Windows 8 is really regarding the lack of options to toggle stuff as I desire away from the defaults.

To answer your points,

1. On my Windows 8 install I have everything except the Desktop tile unpinned. I really don't see a point to Live Tiles on my Desktop. I just have no use for them in the slightest. I don't think my view should be forced on others though, I'd prefer options in this arena.

2. I don't pin applications to the Taskbar. It results in a cluttered Taskbar and I'm not a fan of clutter. I also don't pin anything to my Taskbar in Windows 7 either. I launch the majority of my applications using Run and the remaining few using Start Menu search. I do this largely because I hate touching my mouse and using my KB I'm able to launch any application at the speed of my thoughts.

I could adjust to Windows 8 a lot easier if MS gave me a few more options, primarily around disabling the Start Screen. It is honestly of no use to me in any manner. The qualms that I can just ignore it would be fine if there weren't cases where I become trapped in it. Such as opening a PDF, which will default to the Metro Reader app, and clicking the start button. If I do this from the desktop I can't return to the Desktop without clicking the Desktop tile. As hitting Start will take me to the Start Screen and hitting ESC at the Start Screen will take be back to Reader. To me I'm trapped.

For today's average user I feel Windows 8 brings some good things to the table for them. Most users don't really understand computers as is and giving them big boxes with very limited functionality, like their phones, would be a major win. Abstracting them away from all of the details of an OS really helps them as they just have less to learn and understand. I get this and I'm not against it.

Options to let me return my setup to "advanced" or "hard" or whatever it would be called would be appreciated.

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Kyang    112

Being a programmer I'm a hyper power user and I prefer to have the ability to adjust the way I work to be what I feel is best for me. Average users don't do this and don't want to do this. I'm aware of this, and is why my complaints about Windows 8 is really regarding the lack of options to toggle stuff as I desire away from the defaults.

To answer your points,

1. On my Windows 8 install I have everything except the Desktop tile unpinned. I really don't see a point to Live Tiles on my Desktop. I just have no use for them in the slightest. I don't think my view should be forced on others though, I'd prefer options in this arena.

2. I don't pin applications to the Taskbar. It results in a cluttered Taskbar and I'm not a fan of clutter. I also don't pin anything to my Taskbar in Windows 7 either. I launch the majority of my applications using Run and the remaining few using Start Menu search. I do this largely because I hate touching my mouse and using my KB I'm able to launch any application at the speed of my thoughts.

I could adjust to Windows 8 a lot easier if MS gave me a few more options, primarily around disabling the Start Screen. It is honestly of no use to me in any manner. The qualms that I can just ignore it would be fine if there weren't cases where I become trapped in it. Such as opening a PDF, which will default to the Metro Reader app, and clicking the start button. If I do this from the desktop I can't return to the Desktop without clicking the Desktop tile. As hitting Start will take me to the Start Screen and hitting ESC at the Start Screen will take be back to Reader. To me I'm trapped.

For today's average user I feel Windows 8 brings some good things to the table for them. Most users don't really understand computers as is and giving them big boxes with very limited functionality, like their phones, would be a major win. Abstracting them away from all of the details of an OS really helps them as they just have less to learn and understand. I get this and I'm not against it.

Options to let me return my setup to "advanced" or "hard" or whatever it would be called would be appreciated.

On point number 2, wouldn't having them pinned to the taskbar and then using Win+the number shortcut to launch programs work more in your keyboard oriented style? It would be faster than using the run command.

Also, if the desktop tile is all you have pinned in the start screen, you can just hit Enter to return to it. Hitting enter on the Start screen starts the first item that's pinned there. If the Desktop tile is all that's there, it's what will be activated. Hope this helps.

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+LogicalApex    1,747

On point number 2, wouldn't having them pinned to the taskbar and then using Win+the number shortcut to launch programs work more in your keyboard oriented style? It would be faster than using the run command.

Also, if the desktop tile is all you have pinned in the start screen, you can just hit Enter to return to it. Hitting enter on the Start screen starts the first item that's pinned there. If the Desktop tile is all that's there, it's what will be activated. Hope this helps.

Yes, Win+Number is faster, but it clutters up my Taskbar. I'm not a fan of clutter so I don't use that method.

To me having everything "pinned" irrespective of its state is messy. It is analogous to those who littered their desktop with shortcuts to everything.

Thanks for the tip on the enter key as a way to help escape the Start Screen.

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Dot Matrix    7,438

Being a programmer I'm a hyper power user and I prefer to have the ability to adjust the way I work to be what I feel is best for me. Average users don't do this and don't want to do this. I'm aware of this, and is why my complaints about Windows 8 is really regarding the lack of options to toggle stuff as I desire away from the defaults.

To answer your points,

1. On my Windows 8 install I have everything except the Desktop tile unpinned. I really don't see a point to Live Tiles on my Desktop. I just have no use for them in the slightest. I don't think my view should be forced on others though, I'd prefer options in this arena.

2. I don't pin applications to the Taskbar. It results in a cluttered Taskbar and I'm not a fan of clutter. I also don't pin anything to my Taskbar in Windows 7 either. I launch the majority of my applications using Run and the remaining few using Start Menu search. I do this largely because I hate touching my mouse and using my KB I'm able to launch any application at the speed of my thoughts.

I could adjust to Windows 8 a lot easier if MS gave me a few more options, primarily around disabling the Start Screen. It is honestly of no use to me in any manner. The qualms that I can just ignore it would be fine if there weren't cases where I become trapped in it. Such as opening a PDF, which will default to the Metro Reader app, and clicking the start button. If I do this from the desktop I can't return to the Desktop without clicking the Desktop tile. As hitting Start will take me to the Start Screen and hitting ESC at the Start Screen will take be back to Reader. To me I'm trapped.

For today's average user I feel Windows 8 brings some good things to the table for them. Most users don't really understand computers as is and giving them big boxes with very limited functionality, like their phones, would be a major win. Abstracting them away from all of the details of an OS really helps them as they just have less to learn and understand. I get this and I'm not against it.

Options to let me return my setup to "advanced" or "hard" or whatever it would be called would be appreciated.

You're talking about using a consumer-oriented OS like some kind of nerd's plaything, which is never going to happen. You're most likely the one person still using the archaic run dialog that should have been stripped from windows in Windows 7.

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BajiRav    2,137

Being a programmer I'm a hyper power user and I prefer to have the ability to adjust the way I work to be what I feel is best for me. Average users don't do this and don't want to do this. I'm aware of this, and is why my complaints about Windows 8 is really regarding the lack of options to toggle stuff as I desire away from the defaults.

To answer your points,

1. On my Windows 8 install I have everything except the Desktop tile unpinned. I really don't see a point to Live Tiles on my Desktop. I just have no use for them in the slightest. I don't think my view should be forced on others though, I'd prefer options in this arena.

2. I don't pin applications to the Taskbar. It results in a cluttered Taskbar and I'm not a fan of clutter. I also don't pin anything to my Taskbar in Windows 7 either. I launch the majority of my applications using Run and the remaining few using Start Menu search. I do this largely because I hate touching my mouse and using my KB I'm able to launch any application at the speed of my thoughts.

I could adjust to Windows 8 a lot easier if MS gave me a few more options, primarily around disabling the Start Screen. It is honestly of no use to me in any manner. The qualms that I can just ignore it would be fine if there weren't cases where I become trapped in it. Such as opening a PDF, which will default to the Metro Reader app, and clicking the start button. If I do this from the desktop I can't return to the Desktop without clicking the Desktop tile. As hitting Start will take me to the Start Screen and hitting ESC at the Start Screen will take be back to Reader. To me I'm trapped.

For today's average user I feel Windows 8 brings some good things to the table for them. Most users don't really understand computers as is and giving them big boxes with very limited functionality, like their phones, would be a major win. Abstracting them away from all of the details of an OS really helps them as they just have less to learn and understand. I get this and I'm not against it.

Options to let me return my setup to "advanced" or "hard" or whatever it would be called would be appreciated.

with all due respect - that's not some hyper power user stuff at all. Your habits (or work style) sound like the relics of the pre-XP past.

To answer specific points

1. If you don't pin anything to taskbar then it makes even more sense to pin non-metro stuff to start screen IMO.

2. If you have multiple things running constantly, having them pinned to the taskbar makes sense. Winkey+# can be used for app switching and not only launching. It will also improve your workflow if things are in predictable places (muscle memory and stuff). Is that clutter? - well completely subjective (i.e. I don't think it is)

If you are a KB junkie then taskbar pinning is something you should really try

3. Change PDF to your reader of choice? You already have that option. You are not trapped anywhere - just use winkey+D to jump back to desktop from anywhere?

I don't see anything advanced or hard in your setup. What you do sure sounds like that but how you do is pretty average stuff.

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+LogicalApex    1,747

You're talking about using a consumer-oriented OS like some kind of nerd's plaything, which is never going to happen. You're most likely the one person still using the archaic run dialog that should have been stripped from windows in Windows 7.

There in lies the problem that Microsoft created with Windows XP, by merging the Professional OS with the Consumer OS. I'm not talking about using the OS as "some kind of nerd's plaything"... I'm talking about using a professional OS professionally. Software development is my profession and it is what I make a living doing.

Windows 8 is an everything OS, which is a major part of their problem right now, as it is being pushed for consumers, professionals, tablets, and probably phones next. They are hoping that they can sell it a lot like some retailers sell hats "one size fits all". Realistically, one size can fit most, but not all.

Although, as I said, I'm not really expecting them to put my desires above that of consumers or even general users (if they aren't consumers). I would just prefer them to give me options as I'm not afraid, or incapable, of finding those options and taking advantage of them.

Also, removing the RUN dialog really wouldn't make a whole lot of sense. Removing that dialog would be a equivalent, in many respects, to removing the command prompt or Powershell. It is a very convenient and quick way to not only execute programs, but to also pass command line arguments to them.

Not something needed by average users as they don't understand how the OS works or what a command line argument is. They want to hit a huge Facebook icon and call it a day. That is fine, we shouldn't all need to be "nerds" to know how to use a computer. But leaving the RUN dialog, for instance, is free and allows you to serve both users. Just like adding options is a very cheap way to accommodate many users with the default setting being tailored to the majority.

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+LogicalApex    1,747

with all due respect - that's not some hyper power user stuff at all. Your habits (or work style) sound like the relics of the pre-XP past.

To answer specific points

1. If you don't pin anything to taskbar then it makes even more sense to pin non-metro stuff to start screen IMO.

2. If you have multiple things running constantly, having them pinned to the taskbar makes sense. Winkey+# can be used for app switching and not only launching. It will also improve your workflow if things are in predictable places (muscle memory and stuff). Is that clutter? - well completely subjective (i.e. I don't think it is)

If you are a KB junkie then taskbar pinning is something you should really try

3. Change PDF to your reader of choice? You already have that option. You are not trapped anywhere - just use winkey+D to jump back to desktop from anywhere?

I don't see anything advanced or hard in your setup. What you do sure sounds like that but how you do is pretty average stuff.

My things are not relics of the "Pre-XP" past. They are the way I prefer to do stuff. Many of them adopted well after XP, but that really wasn't my point.

1. Not for me it doesn't. What benefit does pinning apps to start bring me? I don't want my finger on the mouse to start apps. I also don't want to spend time using my arrow keys to locate a tile. Honestly, hunting for icons at all seems like a childish activity and a waste of my time. This is probably a major reason I launch using RUN or Start Menu Search.

2. I consider them clutter and I don't find it speeds me up at all. When Windows 7 launched I tried them. I even left the default items there for half a year or more and I occasionally pinned an app or two in an attempt to find the benefits. For me, there weren't enough to make me like the feature. Do I think it should be removed? Nope. A lot of people I know love it and we can both use the taskbar in our own way. Win+# was the only thing that was a positive to me for pinning, but seeing apps there all the time irrespective of state was too cluttered for me really.

3. Obviously I can change the PDF app. It was merely an example. If I change everything to a non-Metro app to ensure the Start Screen doesn't load when I open something... If I remove all the tiles because I get no benefit.... Then what am I left with? A screen that is in my way. I would prefer to turn off that thing that adds no value whatsoever. Which was my point. Give me options :)

Have we become incapable of seeing the forest for the trees?

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Dot Matrix    7,438

There in lies the problem that Microsoft created with Windows XP, by merging the Professional OS with the Consumer OS. I'm not talking about using the OS as "some kind of nerd's plaything"... I'm talking about using a professional OS professionally. Software development is my profession and it is what I make a living doing.

And running modern operating systems has they were meant to be run isn't "professional"? How is there anything "professional" in torturing yourself with archaic methods?

Also, removing the RUN dialog really wouldn't make a whole lot of sense. Removing that dialog would be a equivalent, in many respects, to removing the command prompt or Powershell. It is a very convenient and quick way to not only execute programs, but to also pass command line arguments to them.

Good news then, you can run command line commands from the Search bars in both Win7 and Win8. The Search bar can do everything the run dialog did.

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+LogicalApex    1,747

And running modern operating systems has they were meant to be run isn't "professional"? How is there anything "professional" in torturing yourself with archaic methods?

Torturing myself? Where do you get this stuff?

I'm not sure what's so hard to understand here really. But this is the difference between serious power users, like myself, and people like you.

I don't intend to ever use my computer purely "in the way its meant to be run". That's the reason I write software. I prefer to make the computer do stuff that I decided it should do, not that it was "designed" or "intended" to do.

Good news then, you can run command line commands from the Search bars in both Win7 and Win8. The Search bar can do everything the run dialog did.

My point is simple. There is no need to remove something that works and doesn't impact users in any manner. It would take more work for MS to remove the Run dialog than it is to leave it.

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Dot Matrix    7,438

Torturing myself? Where do you get this stuff?

I'm not sure what's so hard to understand here really. But this is the difference between serious power users, like myself, and people like you.

I don't intend to ever use my computer purely "in the way its meant to be run". That's the reason I write software. I prefer to make the computer do stuff that I decided it should do, not that it was "designed" or "intended" to do.

My point is simple. There is no need to remove something that works and doesn't impact users in any manner. It would take more work for MS to remove the Run dialog than it is to leave it.

I can tell you're not long in the tech world... What are you going to do once Windows 9 rolls around?

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+LogicalApex    1,747

I can tell you're not long in the tech world... What are you going to do once Windows 9 rolls around?

What gives you that idea? In my profession people are passionate about knowing how these things work and making them work our way. If we ever lose that you should be sad. We push the envelope of technology as a result of this. So I disagree that my career will be short.

I would agree if it were my job to be Windows tech support, but it isn't.

I will do the same thing I do every Windows release. I will use it and decide if it benefits me enough to use. I couldn't care less how much it benefits you, or anyone else.

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+warwagon    13,211

You're talking about using a consumer-oriented OS like some kind of nerd's plaything, which is never going to happen. You're most likely the one person still using the archaic run dialog that should have been stripped from windows in Windows 7.

Don't touch the Fracking run box!! I use the run box all day every day. It's how I type in URL's, It's how I go to folders, It's how I do a lot of things. Sure I guess i could use the "Search box" but over the many many years, it's just natural to click windows key + R

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scaramonga    202

I can tell you're not long in the tech world... What are you going to do once Windows 9 rolls around?

Celebrate, and lay Windows 8 up on that dusty old shelf beside Vista and ME where it belongs. I know two's company and three's a crowd, but honestly, the three of them belong together.

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Dot Matrix    7,438

Do you guys honestly think that run box will last much longer!?

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Brandon H    3,174

Do you guys honestly think that run box will last much longer!?

why not? that's one thing that's definitely not hurting anything by being there

and it especially comes in handy when/if explorer crashes

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